Guestbook Archive

October 15, 2003 to March 17, 2006

This site is dedicated to the memory of the Jewish population from Deretchin, Dolhinov, Druya, Dunolovichi, Gluboyke, Horodok, Ilja, Ivie, Kaziany, Kossovo, Kovno, Krasne, Krivichi, Kurenets, Lebedevo, Lyntupy, Maladzyechna, Minsk, Novogrudok, Olshan, Oshmany, Panevezys, Postavy, Radoshokovichi, Rakov, Sharkovshchyzna, Smorgon, Vashki, Vileyka, Vilna, Vishnevo and Volozhin who perished during the Holocaust.

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Robert Dupuis (Rob.Dup.@gmx.de) ------------------------------------------------------------------- Shalom, ------------------------------------------------Here are my newest informations about my maternal Kantorowitz ancestrory from Slonim, Gubernia Grodno, Belorus (founding into the State Archiv in Grodno): I. Movsha Kantorovitsch, b. 1750 in Slonim, married with ? D. ? in Slonim ? Movshas child: I.I. Leib Movshevich Kantorovitsch, b. 1771 in Slonim, d. between 18834 and 1853 in Slonim. Married with ? Leibs Movshevichs childrens: I.I.a. Lazer Leibovich Kantorovitsch, b. 1806 in Slonim, d. before 1853 in Slonim, married with ? His child: Sender-Movscha Lazerovich Kantorovitsch, b. 1832 in Slonim, d.? Married with ? Sender-Movschas childs: a. Laser Senderovich Kantorovitsch, b. 1851 in Slonim, married with ? Childs ? D. ? b. Leib Senderovich Kantorovitsch, b. 1852 in Slonim, married with ? D. ? Childs ? c. Noson Senderovich Kantorovitsch, b. 1855 in Slonim, married with ? D. ? Childs ? other childs of Leib Movshevich Kantorovitsch: I.II. David Leibovich Kantorovitsch, b. 1821 in Slonim, married with ? D. ? David Leibovich childs: I.II.I. Jankel/Jakob Davidovich Kantorovitsch, b. 1833/1836 in Slonim, married in Riga/Latvia with Minne Mindel (Wilhelmine Henrietta)Isaakovna Keilmann. My late great-great-grandfather Jakob/Jankel David Kantorowitz worked as a translator and from 1861 til 1900 as a railway official for the St.Petersburg-Warszawa railway compagnie. In 1895/96 he lived with his wife in Warszawa. TZhe location of their death were unknown. Jakob can be dies 1903 in Warszawa or in St. Petersburg and his wife Wilhelmina 1914 in Warszawa or in St. Petersburg ??? Childs of Jakob/Jankel and Minne Mindel/Wilhelmina Henrietta Kantorovitsch: a. Sophia Jakobovna Kantorovitsch, b. 1863 in Vilnius, married with ? childs ? d? b. Alexandr Jakobovich Kantorovitsch, b. 1866 in Vilnius, married with ? childs ? d. ? and my late great-grandmother: c. Eugenie Jakobovna Kantorovitsch, b. 1868 in Vilnius, 1886 married in Riga with the surgeon dentist Isidor Philipovich Keilmann (b. 19.9.1856, killed into the Ghetto Riga 30.11.1941); killed into the Ghetto Riga on Nov. 30, 1941. Childs of Isidor and Eugenie Keilmann: a. Harriet Ellen Siderovna Keilmann, b. 1886 in Riga, d. 1933 in Berlin/Germany; married 1908 in Riga with Harald Woldemar von Rathlef. My late aunt Harriet was a famous expressiv scluptress. Their childs: a. Monika, b. Marianna, c. Elisabeth, d. Karl-Ludwig (called Ulf) b. Paul Otto Sidorovich Keilmann, b. 1888 in Riga, d. 1940 in Riga, married 1909 in Riga with Alide Wilson. Their childs: a. Gerta Auguste; Hans and Karina; c. Nikolai Alexander Sidorovich Keilmann (my late grandfather), b. 1896 in Riga, married 1919 in Heidelberg/Germany with Anna Johanna Hirn, killed on March 30, 1942 into the CC Stutthof near Gdansk. Childs of Nikolai and Anna Keilmann: a. Ingeborg Harriet Auguste Keilmann, b. 1920 in Heidelberg/Germany, d. 1981 ion Weiden/Germany, married 1960 in Berlin/Germany with Hans Karl-Jürgen Schulte. They have two childs: Christina and Klaus b. my late mother: Doris Maertha Dagmar Keilmann, b. 1927 in Offenbach/Germany, d. 2003 in Berlin/Germany, married 1951 in Hamburg Germany with Ludwig Emil Dupuis. Their childs: Ferdinand Louis Claus; André Stephan Peter and me: Robert Alexander René other childs of David Leibovich Kantorovitsch: I.II.II. Sholom Davidovich Kantorovitsch, b. 1838 in Slonim, married with ? childs ? d ? I.II.III. Schlioma Davidovich Kantorovitsch, b. 1842 in Slonim, married with ?, childs ? d. ? Other child of Leib Movschovich Kantorovitsch: I.III. Lipa Leibovich Kantorovitsch, b. 1803 in Slonim, married with ? d. ? Childs of Lipa Leibovich: I.III.I. Jankel Lipovich Kantorovitsch, b. 1819/1822 in Slonim, married with ? His child: Honon-Leib Jankelovich/Jakobovich Kantorovitsch, b. 1852 in Slonim, married with ? childs ? d. ? I.III.II. David Lipovich Kantorovitsch, b. 1835 in Slonim, married with ? childs ? d. ? This informations about my Kantorovitsch ancestors were found into the revisions lists of Slonim, Gub. Grodno 1834-1858. Dear reader, if you are relatet with one of my Kantorovitsch ancestors/relativs, please contact me. My post-address: Mr. Robert Dupuis, Weichselstraße 52, D-12045 Berlin, Germany Looking forward for a reply. Best regards Robert Dupuis
Robert Dupuis
- Thursday, March 16, 2006 at 19:44:28 (EST)
Linda Pressman (lindajpr@hotmail.com) Message: My mother, born Chasia Kacowicz (now Helene Burt) in Krivichi, was one of the few survivors of the Nazi massacres. Her father, my grandfather Yaacov, was a shoemaker and was kept alive by the Germans due to this profession, along with his friend, Binyomin Gitlitz, the tailor. My grandmother, now deceased, was born Golda Alperovitz. My mother is now 75; she was 11 to 12 years old during most of these events. Her family ran away from the town prior to the final massacre and lived in the forest until liberation. Thank you for this wonderful site; it has truly touched me. Due to spelling differences and my mother's insistance that she is from Lithuania, not Belarus, I haven't ever found any information before on the town she was from.
Linda Pressman <lindajpr@hotmail.com>
- Tuesday, March 14, 2006 at 19:26:08 (EST)
LOS ANGELES, March 10 Three weeks ago, Dr. Wafa Sultan was a largely unknown Syrian-American psychiatrist living outside Los Angeles, nursing a deep anger and despair about her fellow Muslims.----- Today, thanks to an unusually blunt and provocative interview on Al Jazeera television on Feb. 21, she is an international sensation, hailed as a fresh voice of reason by some, and by others as a heretic and infidel who deserves to die. In the interview, which has been viewed on the Internet more than a million times and has reached the e-mail of hundreds of thousands around the world, Dr. Sultan bitterly criticized the Muslim clerics, holy warriors and political leaders who she believes have distorted the teachings of Muhammad and the Koran for 14 centuries. She said the world's Muslims, whom she compares unfavorably with the Jews, have descended into a vortex of self-pity and violence. Dr. Sultan said the world was not witnessing a clash of religions or cultures, but a battle between modernity and barbarism, a battle that the forces of violent, reactionary Islam are destined to lose. In response, clerics throughout the Muslim world have condemned her, and her telephone answering machine has filled with dark threats. But Islamic reformers have praised her for saying out loud, in Arabic and on the most widely seen television network in the Arab world, what few Muslims dare to say even in private. "I believe our people are hostages to our own beliefs and teachings," she said in an interview this week in her home in a Los Angeles suburb. Dr. Sultan, who is 47, wears a prim sweater and skirt, with fleece-lined slippers and heavy stockings. Her eyes and hair are jet black and her modest manner belies her intense words: "Knowledge has released me from this backward thinking. Somebody has to help free the Muslim people from these wrong beliefs." Perhaps her most provocative words on Al Jazeera were those comparing how the Jews and Muslims have reacted to adversity. Speaking of the Holocaust, she said, "The Jews have come from the tragedy and forced the world to respect them, with their knowledge, not with their terror; with their work, not with their crying and yelling." She went on, "We have not seen a single Jew blow himself up in a German restaurant. We have not seen a single Jew destroy a church. We have not seen a single Jew protest by killing people." She concluded, "Only the Muslims defend their beliefs by burning down churches, killing people and destroying embassies. This path will not yield any results. The Muslims must ask themselves what they can do for humankind, before they demand that humankind respect them." Her views caught the ear of the American Jewish Congress, which has invited her to speak in May at a conference in Israel. "We have been discussing with her the importance of her message and trying to devise the right venue for her to address Jewish leaders," said Neil B. Goldstein, executive director of the organization. She is probably more welcome in Tel Aviv than she would be in Damascus. Shortly after the broadcast, clerics in Syria denounced her as an infidel. One said she had done Islam more damage than the Danish cartoons mocking the Prophet Muhammad, a wire service reported. DR. SULTAN is "working on a book that if it is published it's going to turn the Islamic world upside down." "I have reached the point that doesn't allow any U-turn. I have no choice. I am questioning every single teaching of our holy book." The working title is, "The Escaped Prisoner: When God Is a Monster." Dr. Sultan grew up in a large traditional Muslim family in Banias, Syria, a small city on the Mediterranean about a two-hour drive north of Beirut. Her father was a grain trader and a devout Muslim, and she followed the faith's strictures into adulthood. But, she said, her life changed in 1979 when she was a medical student at the University of Aleppo, in northern Syria. At that time, the radical Muslim Brotherhood was using terrorism to try to undermine the government of President Hafez al-Assad. Gunmen of the Muslim Brotherhood burst into a classroom at the university and killed her professor as she watched, she said. "They shot hundreds of bullets into him, shouting, 'God is great!' " she said. "At that point, I lost my trust in their god and began to question all our teachings. It was the turning point of my life, and it has led me to this present point. I had to leave. I had to look for another god." She and her husband, who now goes by the Americanized name of David, laid plans to leave for the United States. Their visas finally came in 1989, and the Sultans and their two children (they have since had a third) settled in with friends in Cerritos, Calif., a prosperous bedroom community on the edge of Los Angeles County. After a succession of jobs and struggles with language, Dr. Sultan has completed her American medical licensing, with the exception of a hospital residency program, which she hopes to do within a year. David operates an automotive-smog-check station. They bought a home in the Los Angeles area and put their children through local public schools. All are now American citizens.BUT even as she settled into a comfortable middle-class American life, Dr. Sultan's anger burned within. She took to writing, first for herself, then for an Islamic reform Web site called Annaqed (The Critic), run by a Syrian expatriate in Phoenix.An angry essay on that site by Dr. Sultan about the Muslim Brotherhood caught the attention of Al Jazeera, which invited her to debate an Algerian cleric on the air last July.In the debate, she questioned the religious teachings that prompt young people to commit suicide in the name of God. "Why does a young Muslim man, in the prime of life, with a full life ahead, go and blow himself up?" she asked. "In our countries, religion is the sole source of education and is the only spring from which that terrorist drank until his thirst was quenched."Her remarks set off debates around the globe and her name began appearing in Arabic newspapers and Web sites. But her fame grew exponentially when she appeared on Al Jazeera again on Feb. 21, an appearance that was translated and widely distributed by the Middle East Media Research Institute, known as Memri. Memri said the clip of her February appearance had been viewed more than a million times."The clash we are witnessing around the world is not a clash of religions or a clash of civilizations," Dr. Sultan said. "It is a clash between two opposites, between two eras. It is a clash between a mentality that belongs to the Middle Ages and another mentality that belongs to the 21st century. It is a clash between civilization and backwardness, between the civilized and the primitive, between barbarity and rationality."She said she no longer practiced Islam. "I am a secular human being," she said.The other guest on the program, identified as an Egyptian professor of religious studies, Dr. Ibrahim al-Khouli, asked, "Are you a heretic?" He then said there was no point in rebuking or debating her, because she had blasphemed against Islam, the Prophet Muhammad and the Koran.Dr. Sultan said she took those words as a formal fatwa, a religious condemnation. Since then, she said, she has received numerous death threats on her answering machine and by e-mail. One message said: "Oh, you are still alive? Wait and see." She received an e-mail message the other day, in Arabic, that said, "If someone were to kill you, it would be me."Dr. Sultan said her mother, who still lives in Syria, is afraid to contact her directly, speaking only through a sister who lives in Qatar. She said she worried more about the safety of family members here and in Syria than she did for her own."I have no fear," she said. "I believe in my message. It is like a million-mile journey, and I believe I have walked the first and hardest 10 miles."
Los Angeles Times
USA - Monday, March 13, 2006 at 15:33:34 (EST)
I went to Belarus in September/October of 2005. Those of you who have not been able to make the trip and would like to see my pictures may view them at shutterfly at the following web sites. Caviat: I am not a professional photographer so don't expect perfection. I made one set of photo albums for everyone interested in my trip, therefore some photos are not of genealogical interest. I may have mislabeled an item or two. My memory isn't what it use to be. ----- Brest Litovsk--- http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=0Mbs2rZixYvzg ------ Kobrin Cemetery---- http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=0Mbs2rZixYvZA ----- Kobrin---- http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=0Mbs2rZixYvig ---- Kamenets--- http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=0Mbs2rZixYvqA ---- Antopol---- http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=0Mbs2rZixYsJW ----- Bronnaya Gora---- http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=0Mbs2rZixYsIS ---- Minsk---- http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=0Mbs2rZixYsIw ---Shana
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USA - Friday, March 10, 2006 at 13:06:16 (EST)
JHRG of Belarus to me --------------------------------- Dear Eilat, Bargain on purchasing the house was concluded. Congratulations! I am waiting for any further instructions. Shabbat Shalom.------- Yuri Dorn. -------------------------- The house is in Kurenets, Belarus. about 105 years ago my grandfather; Meir Gurevitz was born at that house to Freda nee Alperovitz and Mordechai Gurevitz. In the 1930s the house belonged to my grandfathers' brother; Natan Gurevitz and his wife; Batia nee Aishiski. During the war the house was use by a Jewish underground cell. I plan to turn the house to a small museum.
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- Friday, March 10, 2006 at 10:58:42 (EST)
Moral Obligation Demands That Holocaust Records be Available for Families of Victims WASHINGTON, March 7 /PRNewswire/ -- Because of the continued refusal of the International Tracing Service (ITS) to permit Holocaust survivors and scholars to access the world's largest closed Holocaust-era archive, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum called on the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), which supervises the ITS, to open the archive and permit the ITS's 11 International Commission board member states to copy its records. Having copies of the ITS records at national Holocaust memorials in their countries would allow survivors and their families, as well as Holocaust scholars, to learn the fates of the victims and better understand the Holocaust itself. Many survivors die each year not knowing details of family members' deportation, incarceration, and death. The international community has a moral obligation to address this injustice. Over 60 years after the end of World War II, the ITS remains one of the few, and certainly the largest, closed archive on the Holocaust. At the end of the war, the Allied powers established the International Tracing Service in Bad Arolsen, Germany, to help reunite non-German families separated during the war and trace missing family members. Among other information, the vast collection includes massive documentation from concentration camps, slave labor camps and post-war displaced person camps. The ITS has performed important humanitarian functions. However, many families seeking information from the ITS receive responses only years after their requests were submitted, and often the information is inadequate or inaccurate. In addition to the Museum, the American Gathering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors in New York, and the 24-nation Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research have demanded that the ITS comply with requests to open the archive and copy the records. Similar materials, though not on the same scale, have been available at archives such as Yad Vashem, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and other repositories in Europe. The ITS is failing to live up to the intent of the 2000 Stockholm Declaration to open Holocaust-era archives. All 11 governments on the International Commission of the ITS, the ITS's governing body, have endorsed the Declaration. For the past eight years the ITS and the ICRC in Geneva have said they would open the archive, and during the last two years, intensive negotiations have taken place. In practice, however, the ITS and the ICRC have consistently refused to cooperate with the International Commission board and have kept the archive closed. Museum Chairman Fred Zeidman said: "There is a moral imperative to make these records available now. It is time for the ITS to give the victims their due and the survivors some closure." Ben Meed, president of the American Gathering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors, emphasized that, "At a time when antisemitism and Holocaust denial are on the rise, we survivors deserve access to this information and the reassurance that it will be open to scholars." SOURCE United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Web Site: http://www.ushmm.org
http://www.ushmm.org
USA - Thursday, March 09, 2006 at 02:32:33 (EST)
I received many emails about a very brave arab woman who said what she felt about killings in the name of Islam and her respect for Jews on Arab T,V- does anyone know who she is?- to see and hear what she said go to; http://switch5.castup.net/frames/20041020_MemriTV_Popup/video_480x360.asp?ai=214&ar;=1050wmv&ak;=null
http://switch5.castup.net/frames/20041020_MemriTV_Popup/video_480x360.asp?ai=214&ar=1050wmv&ak=null
- Tuesday, March 07, 2006 at 17:59:54 (EST)
A note about the poet Moshe Kulbak. Born in Snorgon to Solmon and Zelda nee Gordon in 1896. His daughter; Raia Kulbak survived and lives in Ramat Gan, Israel since the 1990s'. Moshe and his family; wife, children Raia and Ilia, sister Tonia and her husband and daughter, His parents; Solomon and Zelda Kulbak, all lived in Minsk. Moshe and his wife weres taken to a camp by the soviets in 1937. The entire family, other the Raia and her mother, perished near Minsk in c 1942. It took Raia many years to find the details of her fathers death at the hands of the Soviets in 1937. I would like to thank Leon Koll for emailing a link to a site (in Russian) with a detailed story by Raia and another woman who lived with the family in Minsk during their last years ( 1937- 1942) I found a note; Date: March 18, 2004 From: ptureck@rogers.com Subject: Moyshe Kulbak, Vilne I am seeking material on Moyshe Kulbak's poem "Vilne". It can be found in Yiddish, and in translation in "The Penguin Book of Modern Yiddish Verse", edited by Khome Shmeruk, Irving Howe, and Ruth Wisse. Has anybody written an analysis of this poem, penned by Kulbak? I want to understand the poem, and its description of Vilne. I also would like to know if there is a university course in North America on "Jewish Vilne", Yerushalayim D'Lite, or a university course on "The Multi-Ethnic Make-Up of Wilno/Vilnius". Nekhame (Naomi) Miller-Tureck Toronto, Ontario for the site in Russian go to; http://www.ibiblio.org/yiddish/EK/ek971205-1.html
http://www.ibiblio.org/yiddish/EK/ek971205-1.html
- Tuesday, March 07, 2006 at 12:02:08 (EST)
Attention All who have found their ascendants to be Holocaust victims but not listed on Yad Vashem. The first line of this request says it all. Rachelle Berliner Let no Holocaust Victim be Forgotten It is extremely important that we do not allow the Nazis to obliterate the memory of those they and their cohorts murdered. As you will see below, half of the six million have been remembered at Yad Vashem. But that means that three million are still missing. Please take the time to make certain that each and every members of your family who perished during the Shoah are recorded at Yad Vashem. You can access their website and do your own search. The urgency of the matter is that 60 years after the Shoah ended, those who remember our brothers and sisters who were killed are becoming fewer and fewer. New Community Outreach Guide For Holocaust Remembrance Let no Holocaust Victim be Forgotten Dear Friends, Yad Vashem invites you to join the historic mission of the Jewish people to memorialize every individual Jew who perished in the Holocaust through the collection of the ultimate representation of their identity: their names. To date, half of the six million victims have been recorded in the Central Database of Shoah Victims Names (www.yadvashem.org), where one may access their brief histories and, when available, their photographs, and submit additional names online. Millions of victims may be forgotten forever, unless we recover their names today. We are pleased to offer a new online community outreach guide to initiate local Names Recovery Campaigns. Packed with valuable resources and materials, this free guide will enable Jewish communities to plan and implement meaningful memorial programs, names collection events and related activities around Yom Hashoah - Israels national Holocaust Remembrance Day (this year, 25 April) and other significant dates in the Jewish calendar, such as 10th Tevet, 17th Tammuz, 9th Av, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. The guide is designed for use either by an individual or group, such as a synagogue, community center, welfare agency, survivor and next generation group, university or school. You can use it to call upon members of your community or organization to complete a Page of Testimony for each unregistered victim, or to volunteer to assist others with this urgent task. To access the Community Outreach Guide visit: http://www1.yadvashem.org/names/whyCollect.htm Join today, before the generation that remembers is no longer with us.
www.yadvashem.org
- Tuesday, February 28, 2006 at 17:28:04 (EST)
I have carefully, but unsuccessfully, searched the EPSTEIN genealogical tables that Dr. Neil Rosenstein has published in his book "The Luria Legacy" for Rabbi Yitzhak Mordechai (HaLevy) EPSTEIN, who lived in either Kossovo or Slonim, or both. He lived c. 1820-1880. His relative Nechemia EPSTEIN (same estimated dates) most likely lived in Slonim. Rabbi Yitzhak Mordechai had six children including a son, Yosef (Joseph) and five daughters. He and Nechemia each had a daughter called Chaya (Ida), both of whom lived in Kossovo prior to their immigration to the U.S.. Can anyone direct me to other sources, preferably in English, or - only if fairly well organized - in Hebrew, but not Yiddish, and where I can find them? I live in Israel and would need to be able to access the material here. If anyone can offer me information on either of the above EPSTEINs, I shall be grateful. Irene Berman Shoham, Israel
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- Monday, February 27, 2006 at 20:18:00 (EST)
Maybe somebody can help me pursue this problem. I found the Volozhin yizkor book and it has a lot of information about my ancestors Rabbi Chaim Volozhin and his son Itzele (1780-1849). It gives the names of four of Itzele's children, Eliyohu Zalmen, Rivke, Reyne-Basye, and Rekhl. But it also mentions two others without giving their names. How can I find out what their names were. I don't think that this is impossible because according to historian Michael Stanislawski, Itzele was probably the best known Russian Jew in his generation. Regards Charles Nydorf
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- Sunday, February 26, 2006 at 14:51:09 (EST)
Some days ago Tzila told me that the next multi-shtetl azkara is planned to take place (as the last year) in WIZO House, 38 David Hamelekh Str. Tel Aviv Wednesday Evening, on March 22, 2006, 18:00. Lndsleit from Radoshkovitsh, Krasne, Rakov, Dolhinow, Volozhin, Vishnevo, Ivye, Ilye, Postav, Ivianets and other Yiddish-Litvak Shtetls - between Vilna and Minsk, are called to participate. Everyone who wants to participate, is invited to let us know ++972-3-55243932, OR through Eilat's site, or my EMail. During the last year passed away two descendants born in Volozhin, both of them survived WWII, in Siberia, exiled by the Soviets in 1940. Reva Shneider, born Rapoport. Deceased in Australia. Benyamin Wand Polak, Deceased in Tel Aviv. MAY THEY REST IN PEACE Last year a small number of natives of Volozhin came.However a number of second and third generation arrived. Sons and grandsons of Mula Polack, Shoshana Berkovitz, Shaye Cahanovitz, Yosef Shvartzberg, Munia perlman, Lila Nachshon- Shiff, Binyamin Shishko, leyzer Melzer , Chaim P{otashnik and others....
Moshe Porat (Perlman)
Tel Aviv, - Saturday, February 25, 2006 at 14:07:36 (EST)
-----------------------INVITATION----------------------- --------to the multishtel memorial service --------------- ----RADUSHKOVITSH-KRASNE-HORODOK-VOLOZHIN-RAKOV ------ --------------------Shoah Martyrs-------------------------- Dear Landsleit, ---------------------------------------------------------- The multi-Shtetl Memorial Service will take place in the WIZO Home, 38 David Hamelekh Str. in Tel Aviv at Wednesday Evening, on March 22, 2006. The doors will open from 17:30, the ceremony will start at 19:00. On the agenda: ---------------------- Words of the shtetl representatives, El Mole Rahamim & Kaddish, Candles lighting, refreshments. The purpose of the AZKARA is to transmit the memory of our annihilated congregations to the young generation. Pls confirm reception of this message and let us know about your participation/offer to carry some words/ your approval to receive the Memorial Service description. Respectfully: The organization Committee Tsila/Itskhak Zilburg, tel: ++972 3 964 7532, ------------------------------------------
Zilburg
Rishon lezion, Israel - Thursday, February 23, 2006 at 19:24:40 (EST)
David Scheinok (david.scheinok@skynet.be) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Message: Thanks for doing such internet site... it is the first time that I could read some informations about the story of the diaspora cocnerning specific names... maybe I could find some missing links concerning my family... --------------------- From Ancestry.com; Markus Scheinok born; 18 Dec 1893 passed away; Sep 1966 Far Rockaway, Queens, New York -- Sally Sarah Scheinok born; 13 Jun 1907 passed away; Nov 23 1984 Miami, Miami-dade, Florida --------------- Name: Scheinok, Perry A born; 1931- Malka Scheinok - Source Citation: Who's Who in Technology Today. Fourth edition. Five volumes. Edited by Barbara A. Tinucci. Lake Bluff, IL: Research Publications, J. Dick Publishing, 1984. Use the 'Index of Names,' which begins on page 1125 of Volume 5, to locate biographies. (WhoTech 4) ---- Shalva Scheinok-   Chicago ------ Allen & Theresa Scheinok - Poway H L Scheinok   - New Jersey --- Nancy T Scheinok - Miami Florida --- Norbert E Scheinok San Diego --- Tamir Scheinok, CEO at Fluid--- David Scheinok de Bruxelles ---
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- Wednesday, February 22, 2006 at 10:59:59 (EST)
I fell upon this site...doing some research for an upcoming lecture I will be giving.  I found my Dad's name, Marvin (Modechai) Ginsburg.  I thought I would let you know that my wonderful father passed away on September 2, 2005. My mother, Judith, (Yudis), lives here in Florida. 1964--- Sheri G Mantzoor---- Marvin Ginsburg -- Last Residence: 33066  Pompano Beach, Broward, Florida --- Born: 26 Jun 1906 --- Died: 2 Sep 2005 --- State (Year) SSN issued: New York (Before 1951 ) ---- --------
Sheri Ginsburg Mantzoor
Boca Raton , USA - Monday, February 20, 2006 at 14:49:57 (EST)
Dear Siggers      An acrostic on the headstone of my gr grandfather Abraham ben Isaac Levi SOLOVEICHIK (1838-1918) declares him to be a descendent of 'Itsele'. Based on some other facts, I am assuming that Itsele refers to Rabbi Yitskhok ben Khayim VOLOZHINER (1780-1849.)      Abraham was an Israel so if he is a descendant of Rabbi Yitskhok who was a Cohen it would have to be on the maternal side. Given their dates it would seem most likely that Abraham's father, Isaac, married a daughter or grand daughter of Rabbi Yitskhok.      In the 'Unbroken Chain', R. Yitskhok is shown as having three daughters, Rechl, Reyne-Basye and Rivke,  but all married other men. So I am considering three possibilities 1. One of the daughters listed was married more than once and one of her   husbands was Isaac. 2. There was another daughter, not listed, who married Isaac. 3. One of R. Yitskhok's grand daughters married Isaac.      I would appreciate hearing from anyone who has information about this.                                    Regards                                 Charles -----------------------  Charles Nydorf wrote ; I would appreciate hearing from anyone who has information about the daughters of Rabbi Itsele Volozhiner (Itzhok) Moshe Porat, the g g grandson of Rabbi Itsele Volozhiner wrote; As for Charles Nydorf question; Rabbi Itsele Volozhiner (Itzhok) was Rabbi Hayim Volozhiner's (Yeshiva Eytz Hayim Founder) son. Reb Itsele's children were: Daughter; Reine Bashe - married  Harav Naftali Zvi Berlin HANAZIV Daughter; Rivka - married  Rabbi Eliezer Itzhok Fried Daughter Rehl - married Samuel Landau Son Eliyahu Zalman - He  called himself and his children by the second name ITZHAYKIN.  His grand daughter; Malka Itshaykin (my father's mother) inherited the big stone house (Beys Harav) on the south rib of the Volozhin Market Place and lived there during the twenties/thirties of the past century. Kol Tuv Moshe Porat Tel Aviv poratm@netvision.net.il ------------------------- Dear Moshe,---- I read with great interest that you are a descendant of HaimVolozhiner. I compiled tree of his descendants, which is incomplete. I would love to be in touch to add your knowledge to what I have. Part of the family appears in my book THE UNBROKEN CHAIN. Below is what I know about Rehl/Rechel from my FTW file. I also assume that you are connected to the Rivlins as is Menachem Porat? Sincerely, Dr. Neil Rosenstein Descendants of Rechel Volozhiner        1       Rechel Volozhiner               d: June 15, 1854 ..              +Samuel Landau  b: 1821 d: August 22, 1845 ....    2       Daughter Landau ........                +Haim Hilllel Fried     b: 1833 d: 1880------------- Moshe wrote; Hayim Hilel Fried's Children (from Volozhin Yizkor Book); Rehl,    Freydele,   Shmuel,   Eliezer Itskhok,   Batia,    Ester Shmuel served as a Rov in Vilna, Eliezer Itskhok worked in the tree commerce in Russia and Danzig, Rehl and Ester were married to men in Minsk and Volozhin vicinities. Freydele di Rebetsn - born in Volozhin deceased in Jerusalem. Freydele's husband Avigdor Derechinski served as Rov in Volozhin (late twenties, early thirties XXth century. Di Rebetsn and my Grandma, Babushka Malka Perlman (born Itshaykin) were best friends. As little boy I was invited to Freidele's Rabbinical Sukot diner. Her first  son Moshe Zalman Ben Sasson (Lunz) was the first  family member to make Aliya. He replaced his second name to Ben Sasson (Son of Joy - as his mother was called.- Freyd is Joy) The whole  family made aliya after Moshe Zalman. Moshe Zalman was murdered by Arab terrorists near Yavniel in 1937. The sons Hayim Hilel and Yona were professors in the Jerusalem University. Her grand kids live now in Jerusalem. Yona's eldest son Professor Menahem Ben Sasson is serving as Rector of the Jerusalem Hebrew University. Kol Tuv Moshe Porat (Perlman)
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- Monday, February 20, 2006 at 13:27:20 (EST)
"Richard Persky" -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- i am interested to learn more about my ancestors who i believe came from the town ivenits(ivenec) near minsk. my paternal grandfather michel persky and his brothers morris and davis settled in england at the beginning of the last century. their brother jacob settled in chicago.i think that there was a sister ann who also came to england. my greatgrandmother came to england but my greatgrandfather remained behind. i have visited the graves in eastern germany of my maternal great and great great grandparents in leipzig and delitcsh. some of the graves were in remarkably good condition. i feel that i should also visit graves in belarus but i have very little information. can you help? best regards richard persky The Persky family from the area between Minsk and Vilna originated in the shtetl Volozhin.Shimon Peres is a member of the family. You could find many of the family graves in the Volozhin Jewish cemetery. You could find Jewish cemeteries all over Belarus. Some are in very good shape. You need a visa to travel to Belarus. I got a visa in Vilnius a day before I crossed the border ( It took about 2 hours) - Did yoy check the site and the Yizkor book for Ivenits(Ivenec)? Do you have pictures to post on the site?
richard persky <rpersky@tintsdirect.co.uk>
- Friday, February 17, 2006 at 19:20:04 (EST)
By Bradley Burston -----------------Haaretz--- There is something that gives Jews and Muslims alike a perverse thrill in calling the other a Nazi. Maybe that's why we can't seem to stop. Both sides ought to know better. Particularly ours. We know this better than anyone: Whenever the Nazis are invoked to condemn an enemy - no matter how brutal - the enormity, the singularity, the very fact of the Holocaust, is diminished. Leveraging the Holocaust to condemn a foe ultimately plays into the hands of Holocaust deniers. If enough leaders are compared to Adolf Hitler, and if the range is wide enough to include George Bush and Yasser Arafat, we could be excused for concluding that Hitler was, in fact, just one of the gang, no different than the rest, no worse. Knowing this doesn't stop us, though. It doesn't even slow us down. The ink had hardly dried on the Palestinian election figures, when a campaigning Benjamin Netanyahu compared the triumph of Hamas with the rise of Hitler and Nazism in the 1930s. The fact is, never before have there been so many ways to deny the Holocaust. Nor more people so keen on taking part. We know very well, for example, why Muslims worldwide call us Nazis. Because it works. When Palestinians, Iranians, or, for that matter, residents of Detroit, call Israelis Nazis, people listen. Europeans love hearing it, of course, because it gets them off the hook. If the Jews are Nazis, they note, then we're all even. Europeans, hearing this, no longer have to feel guilty about having looked the other way, or having pitched right in, when the actual Nazis turned the world's strongest community of Jews into ash. Western leftists who suffer from the Lawrence of Arabia Complex are especially fond of the image of the IDF soldier as SS man, an analogy that jibes well both with omniscient, oversimplified abused-to-abuser sociobabble, and with many academic leftists' multi-syllabic cartoon vision of world events and foreign peoples. They lap it up when Muslims condemn Israel for Nazification, when they call Gaza the world's biggest concentration camp, or when they cite deportation as evidence of genocide. The Nazified Israeli soldier chestnut also frees Muslims from whatever guilt they might otherwise feel when terrorism cuts down innocent people. When defending oneself against ultimate evil, our Muslim cousins assure us, all means are entirely legitimate. There remains, however, an element of such perversity in calling Israelis Nazis that the lies begin to unravel of their own weight. The perversity is especially evident when radical settlers cast themselves in the role of Holocaust victims, wearing Star of David patches and calling Israeli troops Nazis to their faces. Far more insidious, in some ways, is the collective amnesia of the Internet, which is uniquely suited to Holocaust denial through over-analogization. In the era of the e-news junkie, paranoia is the new pornography. And nothing says My Enemy is a Nazi like paranoia. The compulsion to use the term is such that it has spawned Godwin's Law, which states that "As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches 1." At this point, more than 60 years after the last of the extermination camps was freed, the horror of the Holocaust has so receded from the collective memory that the words Soup Nazi can elicit gales of sitcom laughter. As the shock wears off, the spin-offs multiply: grammar nazi, fashion nazi, feminazi. And as the spin-offs gain currency, the term nazi can stretch to fit any annoyance. At this point, we can apply it to any vaguely persnickety individual we don't much care for. If anyone can be a nazi, perhaps the real Nazis were no worse than the rest of us. To be fair, if we Jews can't keep ourselves from comparing our enemies to the Nazis, we have, if nothing else, two good excuses. One is our tradition. The many sections of our liturgy that inform us that They're Out to Get Us. We drink it in, if not with mothers' milk, then with Passover wine. "For not one man only has risen up against us to destroy us, but in every generation do men rise up against us to destroy us," we intone, warming up for the Ten Plagues. And if not with Passover wine, then with Purim schnapps, as we toast the failure of an ancient, aborted genocide plan for Persian Jewry. The second reason, of course, is that there actually are men who rise up against us, generation after generation, in order to destroy us. And the generation time is growing shorter and shorter. Only 15 years separate Saddam Hussein's declared Gulf War goal of incinerating Israel, and Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's recent suggestion that the Jewish state be wiped off the map. All the while, the holy men of Hamas, Hezbollah and the Islamic Jihad have been preaching our elimination. And yet. The Jewish People owe it to the victims of the Holocaust and the survivors still with us, to resist the impulse to liken current threats - as dangerous as and potentially cataclysmic as they may be - to an event of biblical magnitude in the long history of the Jews. The most insidious form of Holocaust denial, after all, reduces the annihilation of six million people to just one more rhetorical argument over current issues. All we can offer the victims and the survivors, is to honor their memory by reminding ourselves and others of the incomparable uniqueness of their unknowable hell. Enough comparisons. Enough cynicism. Let it stop with us.
,
- Friday, February 17, 2006 at 08:44:45 (EST)
My father "Samuel David Bingman" a survivor of Lodz, just died on his birthday November 24, 2005 Bruce Bingman (brucebingman@gmail.com) Name: Samuel D Bingman Birth Date: 1932 City: Chevy Chase Margaret L Bingman
Bruce Bingman <brucebingman@gmail.com>
USA - Friday, February 17, 2006 at 07:37:55 (EST)
A note from the Jewishgen digest;Subject: Success Wainer (Winner)  Searching SHEPSENVOL and ZIGLIN From: Bopollack@aol.com Beyond our expectation.  I grew up with the name Tzak Springer on my lips. My grandfather lost contact with his sisters during WWII.  The only name my mother could remember was that one of his sisters married a Tsak Springer. After 64 years thanks to many most kind and vigilant people including Eilat Gordin, the son of Tzak and Shifra has been found in Israel. His name is Shepsel Shpringer. My cousin, Phyllis Grodzinsky Winstead and I are most grateful and very excited.  We now learned that there might be family members in the US. The last names are ZIGLIN (family of Eli Ziglin) and the name SHEPSENVOL. (family of Zalmon and Nehama nee Wainer). Our grandfather was Yehuda (Yudel Mendel) Winner.  He came to the US with his sister Rebecca Winner Barofsky.  His sisters remained behind.  They were Chaya, Nehama, and  Shifra. It is the family of Shifra that has been found. There is a possibility that some of Chaya's (Ziglin) and Nehama's (Shepsenvol) family survived also.   We are searching in the US for the family of Eli Ziglin who was said to have come here. Perhaps the Shepsenvol family as well. Bonnie Mogelever Pollack You could find a huge family tree of the Shepsenvol family of Horodok and Volozhin in Family tree of the Jewish people. Two daughters of that family ( from Volozin) came out of Vina at the start of the war with "Shugiara Visa" . Many of the family members who came to the U.S c 1900 lived in Ohio ( Canton?) http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/horodok/h_pages/h_stories_wainer.html
for pictures and information
- Thursday, February 16, 2006 at 20:43:28 (EST)
Hello. I came accross your web site while surfing the web (with my daughter's help as I am not very technical). My name is Miki Pear and I am a survivor from Warsaw but was in the Stolin Ghetto then hidden by righteous Christians in a small village nearby. Before that, I was (age 5) with my parents in Luniniecz. I am doing research and writing my memoire. Can you help me? What I am looking for is any and all details regarding the Soviet (then Nazi) occupation and destruction of the region. Memorial Books of both ghettos are being translated for me now from Hebrew and Yiddish to English (I do not speak either), but any additional information or contacts you could provide would be tremendously helpful. Are you a survivor yourself? Please contact me at one of the following: Email: pearsies@aol.com Cell Phone: 201.819.7341
Miki Pear
- Monday, February 13, 2006 at 13:44:42 (EST)
- Press Release--- Academic Institute for Jewish Genealogy Opened in Jerusalem --- The International Institute for Jewish Genealogy and Paul Jacobi Center opened today in the Jewish National and University Library at Givat Ram, Jerusalem. After riveting the attentions of thousands of Jews throughout the world over the past two decades, Jewish genealogy and family history has reached a level of maturity that makes it ripe to take its place in the academic world. To that end, the new Institute has two main aims to engage in Jewish genealogical research and teaching at the university level and to make Jewish Genealogy a recognized academic discipline within the realm of Jewish Studies. The Institute is the only one of its kind in the Jewish world. It plans to operate on an interdisciplinary basis and also in a collaborative way with organizations engaged in aspects of Jewish genealogy. It will put a premium on innovative programmes and projects of practical benefit to individual family historians. Its establishment is the result of efforts over the last two years of an international Founding Committee, headed by Dr. Sallyann Sack, Ph.D., of Washington, DC. Dr. Yosef Lamdan, D.Phil., has been appointed as Director of the Institute. Its telephone numbers are +972-(0)2-658-6967 and +972-(0)526-622-624. Its email address is info@IIJG.org and its home page is located at www.IIJG.org (under construction). Editors/journalists interested in interviews or "human interest" stories are invited to contact the Director.
www.IIJG.org
- Monday, February 06, 2006 at 10:11:56 (EST)
Results of search for victims whose family name (including synonyms and maiden names) is 'Szereszewski ' :  339 names ----------------------------------- Shereshevski* Tzvi-   Tzvi Shereshevski was born in Kovno, Lithuania to Shmuel and Cheina nee Levitan in 1933. He was single. Prior to WWII he lived in Kovno, Lithuania. During the war was in Kovno. Tzvi perished in Auschwitz at the age of 10. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 29/04/1980 by his mother Prof. Cheina Ugenia Shereshevski ( Sheri) Tel Aviv---------- Shereshevski* Menakhem -   Menakhem Shereshevski was born in Lithuania to Shmuel and Cheina nee Levitan in 1930. He was single. Prior to WWII he lived in Slobodka, Lithuania. During the war was in Kowna. Menakhem perished in the Shoah at the age of 13. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 29/04/1980 by his mother Prof. Cheina Ugenia Shereshevski ( Sheri) Tel Aviv --------- Szereszewski Tuvia--   Tuvia Szereszewski was born in Kowno, Lithuania to Yitzkhak and Dvora. He was a merchant and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Kowno, Lithuania. During the war was in Kowno, Lithuania. Tuvia perished in Kowno at the age of 58. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted by his relative Chana Segal in Israel------ Szereszewski Berta--   Berta Szereszewski nee Mariampolski was born in Kowno, Lithuania to Khaim and Rivka. She was a housewife and married to Tuvia. Prior to WWII she lived in Kowno, Lithuania. During the war was in Kowno, Lithuania. Berta perished in Kowno at the age of 50. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted by her relative Chana Segal in Israel-------------- Klompus Hanze   --Hanze Klompus nee Schereschewsky was born in Taurage, Lithuania in 1880. She was married. Prior to WWII she lived in Kaunas, Lithuania. During the war was in Kaunas, Lithuania. Hanze perished in 1943 in Estonia. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 01/03/1977 by her daughter-in-law-------- Krivavnik Anna -   Anna Krivavnik nee Schereschevsky was born in Taurogen, Lithuania in 1942 to Isaac and Gita. She was a housewife and married to Jacob. Prior to WWII she lived in Taurogen, Lithuania. During the war was in Kowno. Anna perished in 1942 in Fort 7. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 06/03/1999 by her granddaughter ---------- Shereshewsky Njuta---   Njuta Shereshewsky nee Koifman was born in Kowno, Lithuania to Zakharia. She was a housewife and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Riga, Latvia. During the war was in Riga, Latvia. Njuta perished in 1941 in Riga, Latvia at the age of 40. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 15/01/1956 by her sister-in-law Rivka Shereshewsky in Tel Aviv ---------- Shereshewsky Lazeris -   Lazeris was born in Lithuania in 1923 to Mikhael and Sara. He was a carpenter and single. Prior to WWII he lived in Taurage, Lithuania. During the war was in Kowno, Lithuania. Lazeris perished in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 12/02/1956 by his sister Yona Shefer . .    --------- Shershevski Yosef  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Szereszewska Malka  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1898  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Salomon  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1880  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Volf*          1934  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Batia          1936  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Nisan          1930  Page of Testimony  Szereszewsky Khaia          1932  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Neli*          1928  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski David          1890  Page of Testimony  Szereszewsky Elka          1896  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski* Noakh            Page of Testimony  ProofReading  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1929  Page of Testimony  Miriam  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1901  Page of Testimony  Yitzkhak  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1897  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski* Avraham  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Shereshevski Vladimir  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1900  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Nachman  WARSZAWA  WARSZAWA  WARSZAWA  POLAND  1880  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Sula  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Bajarski Sarah  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Shereshewski Shmuel  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1924  Page of Testimony  Shereshewski Zorach  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1934  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Joseph  BARANOWICZE  BARANOWICZE  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1920  Page of Testimony  Shereshewski Yehuda  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1897  Page of Testimony  Shershewsky Bluma  WARSZAWA  WARSZAWA  WARSZAWA  POLAND  1915  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Roza  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1922  Page of Testimony  Levin Lova  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1895  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Abraham  WOLKOWYSK  WOLKOWYSK  BIALYSTOK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Shereshewski Moshe  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1900  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Salomon  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1880  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Chaja  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1924  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Malka  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1914  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Bluma  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1925  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski Itzchak  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1898  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Mania  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Shereshewski Miriam  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1898  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Motel  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Shereshewski Ester  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1905  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski Ana  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1870  Page of Testimony  Szraszewski Sara  WILNO  WILNO  WILNO  POLAND  1875  Page of Testimony  Szaraszewski Ester  WILNO  WILNO  WILNO  POLAND  1905  Page of Testimony  Szaraszewski Rachel  WILNO  WILNO  WILNO  POLAND  1913  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Leib  WARSZAWA  WARSZAWA  WARSZAWA  POLAND  1913  Page of Testimony  Solowiejczyk Miriam  WILNO  WILNO  WILNO  POLAND  1900  Page of Testimony  Mosin Zelda  WILNO  WILNO  WILNO  POLAND  1897  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski Rachel  MARCINKANCE  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1904  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Wolf  STOLOWICZE  BARANOWICZE  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1917  Page of Testimony  Szereszewska Liuba  VILNA  WILNO  WILNO  POLAND  1926  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski* Meir  LITHUANIA          Page of Testimony  Szereszewska Rachel  WILNO  WILNO  WILNO  POLAND  1895  Page of Testimony  Szereszewska Rachel            Page of Testimony  Geller Lova  WILNO  WILNO  WILNO  POLAND    Page of Testimony    Shereshevski Ruvim  MINSK  MINSK CITY  MINSK  BELORUSSIA  1894  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski  MINSK  MINSK CITY  MINSK  BELORUSSIA  1928  Page of Testimony  Lundin Fania  MINSK  MINSK CITY  MINSK  BELORUSSIA  1900  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski Grigori  MINSK  MINSK CITY  MINSK  BELORUSSIA  1929  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski Khasia  MINSK  MINSK CITY  MINSK  BELORUSSIA  1905  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski Ruvim  MINSK  MINSK CITY  MINSK  BELORUSSIA  1896  Page of Testimony    Drizin Dvora  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA    Page of Testimony  Shereshevskaya  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA  1934  Page of Testimony  Sharshevski  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA  1933  Page of Testimony  Gurvich Traina  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA  1881  Page of Testimony  Shereshevskaya Gerda  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA  1910  Page of Testimony  Shershevsky Boris  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA  1900  Page of Testimony  Slutzkov Sofya  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA    Page of Testimony  Shereshewsky Susanna  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA  1922  Page of Testimony  Shereshewsky Ljuba  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA  1900  Page of Testimony  Shershewsky Aaron  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA    Page of Testimony  Schereschevsky Gerda  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA  1910  Page of Testimony  Shereshewsky Jakow  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA    Page of Testimony  Shershewsky Nechoma  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA  1904  Page of Testimony  Shereshewsky Njuta  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA    Page of Testimony  Stupel Elfriede          1900  list of deportation from the Netherlands  Sharshevski Boris  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA  1902  Page of Testimony  Sharshevski  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA  1931  Page of Testimony  Sharshevski Gerda  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA  1910  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski Eizhen  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA  1932  Page of Testimony  Shereshevsky Frida  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA    Page of Testimony  Minz Slawa  RIGA  RIGAS  VIDZEME  LATVIA  1902  Page of Testimony  Name   Town   District   Region   Country   Birth Date   Source   Friedman Sonia  PINSK  PINSK  POLESIE  POLAND    Page of Testimony  ProofReading  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1929  Page of Testimony  Miriam  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1901  Page of Testimony  Yitzkhak  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1897  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski Meer  BRATSLAV  BRATSLAV  VINNITSA  UKRAINE    Page of Testimony  Vrubel Bluma  BIALISTOK  BIALYSTOK  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1916  Page of Testimony  Szeroszewski Szmuel  DROHICHIN  DROHICZYN POLESKI  POLESIE  POLAND  1889  Page of Testimony  Szeroszewski Gedaljau  DROHICZYN      POLAND  1922  Page of Testimony  Szeroszewski Elka  DROHICZYN      POLAND  1890  Page of Testimony  Szeroszewski Brajndla  DROHICHIN  DROHICZYN POLESKI  POLESIE  POLAND  1920  Page of Testimony  Szereszowski Aron  KOBRYN  KOBRYN  POLESIE  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Shereshevski* Avraham  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Shereshevski* Meir  SIMIATIC  BIELSK PODLASKI  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1903  Page of Testimony  Tokarski Nekhama  SIMIATICE  BIELSK PODLASKI  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1905  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski* Feiga  SIMIATIC  BIELSK PODLASKI  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1875  Page of Testimony  Shershevski Vladimir  DNEPROPETROVSK  DNEPROPETROVSK  DNEPROPETROVSK  UKRAINE  1925  Page of Testimony  Schereschewski Eva  BERLIN  BERLIN  BERLIN  GERMANY  1901  list of deportation from Berlin  Schereschewski Martha  BERLIN  BERLIN  BERLIN  GERMANY  1870  list of deportation from Berlin  Schereschewsky Philipp  BERLIN  BERLIN  BERLIN  GERMANY  1864  list of deportation from Berlin  Szereszewska          1917  card file of Mauthausen camp  Stupel Elfriede          1900  list of deportation from the Netherlands  Shereshevski  PRILUKI      UKRAINE    Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Chaja  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1894  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Schereschewsky Philipp          1864  list of Theresienstadt camp inmates  Schereschewski Martha          1870  list of Theresienstadt camp inmates  Szereszewska Elczbeta          1912  list of ghetto inmates  Berta  HORODISHTCH  BARANOWICZE  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1890  Page of Testimony  Shershevski Leiba          1854  Page of Testimony  Ester            Page of Testimony  ProofReading            Page of Testimony  Source   Szereszewska Mirjam  KAMIENIEC LITEWSKI  BRZESC BUGIEM  POLESIE  POLAND  1910  Page of Testimony  Szereszewska Sheina  DANZIG  DANZIG    DANZIG    Page of Testimony  Geller Lova  WILNO  WILNO  WILNO  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Wermund Lola  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1913  Page of Testimony  Szereszewska Estera  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1886  Page of Testimony  Sharshevsky Chaikel  BARANOVICH  BARANOWICZE  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1907  Page of Testimony  Szereszewsky Khaia          1932  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Neli*          1928  Page of Testimony  Shershevsky Volf*  ERZVILKAS  TAURAGE    LITHUANIA    Page of Testimony  Szereszewski David          1890  Page of Testimony  Szereszewsky Elka          1896  Page of Testimony  Krivavnik Anna  TAUROGEN  TAURAGE    LITHUANIA  1942  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski Betea  BESSARABIA REGION    BESSARABIA  ROMANIA  1887  Page of Testimony  Katz Charna  TAVRIG  TAURAGE    LITHUANIA    Page of Testimony  Shereshevski* Noakh            Page of Testimony  Szereszewska Wichne  WOLKOWISK  WOLKOWYSK  BIALYSTOK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Yakob  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1927  Page of Testimony  Szeroszewski Mair  SIEMIATYCZE  BIELSK PODLASKI  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1905  Page of Testimony  Szereszewska Malka  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1898  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Mordechaj  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1902  Page of Testimony  Szereszewska Estera  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1886  Page of Testimony  Szereszewska          1917  card file of Mauthausen camp  Berta  HORODISHTCH  BARANOWICZE  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1890  Page of Testimony  Ester            Page of Testimony  ProofReading            Page of Testimony  Miriam  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1901  Page of Testimony  Vrubel Bluma  BIALISTOK  BIALYSTOK  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1916  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski* Meir  SIMIATIC  BIELSK PODLASKI  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1903  Page of Testimony  Tokarski Nekhama  SIMIATICE  BIELSK PODLASKI  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1905  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski* Feiga  SIMIATIC  BIELSK PODLASKI  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1875  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski Altka  WOLKOWYSK  WOLKOWYSK  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1908  Page of Testimony  Szarszewski Jakob  KNISZYN  BIALYSTOK  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1905  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Jakob  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1930  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Yaakov  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1927  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Estera  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1882  Page of Testimony  Porecki Cypa  SZCZUCZYN  SZCZUCZYN  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1882  Page of Testimony  Kolbowski Chasia  SZCZUCZYN  SZCZUCZYN  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1880  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1924  Page of Testimony  Shereshevsky  MARCINKANCE  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1900  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski Rachel  MARCINKANCE  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1904  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Abraham  WOLKOWYSK  WOLKOWYSK  BIALYSTOK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Szariszewski Feiga  SEMIATYCZE  BIELSK PODLASKI  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1875  Page of Testimony  Shifmanovich Ester  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1870  Page of Testimony  Szeroszewski Chuma  SIEMIATYCZE  BIELSK PODLASKI  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1905  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Herc  SZCZUCZYN  SZCZUCZYN  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1905  Page of Testimony  Szeraszewski Sima  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Sima  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1893  Page of Testimony  Szeroszewski Fajge  SIEMIATYCZE  BIELSK PODLASKI  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1885  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Fania  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1900  Page of Testimony  Szerszewska Rachela  GRODNE  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1903  Page of Testimony  Szarszewska Zelda  KNISZYN  BIALYSTOK  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1902  Page of Testimony  Losz Liza  SZCZUCZYN  SZCZUCZYN  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1892  Page of Testimony  Shereshevsky Lolek  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1903  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski Fania  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1903  Page of Testimony  Magid Maria  WARSAW  WARSZAWA  WARSZAWA  POLAND  1890  Page of Testimony  Shereshewski Israel  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1920  Page of Testimony  Losz  LIDA  LIDA  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1892  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Ester  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1880  Page of Testimony  Sheraszewski Max  POLAND          Page of Testimony  Shereshevski* Majer  SMIATICZ  BIELSK PODLASKI  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1905  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski* Aharon  WOLKOWISK  WOLKOWYSK  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1919  Page of Testimony  Epshtein Rakhel  WOLKOWISK  WOLKOWYSK  BIALYSTOK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Malka  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1914  Page of Testimony  Poczapovska Bertha  HORODYSZCZE  BARANOWICZE  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1900  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski Ania  WOLKOWYSK  WOLKOWYSK  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1939  Page of Testimony  Shereshevski Shlomo  WOLKOWYSK  WOLKOWYSK  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1935  Page of Testimony  Shereshewski Miriam  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1898  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Ester  GRODNO  GRODNO  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1887  Page of Testimony  Szereszewski Motel  SLONIM  SLONIM  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Schereszewski Ester  SIMIATIC  BIELSK PODLASKI  BIALYSTOK  POLAND  1905  Page of Testimony 
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- Wednesday, February 01, 2006 at 08:05:24 (EST)
Louisa Spivack (louspiv@yahoo.co.uk) -- I visited the Kossovo site today and came across my father's uncle, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Szereszewski dated July 1926. It was wonderful to find this, as I am currently trying to find out what happened to my father's large family in Poland/Bylorussia after the war. I know that Rabbi Menachem Mendel died in America in 1929 when he was 83. My grandfather (his brother) Abraham recorded this event in the short family hisory he wrote before he died. My grandfather died when I was one, so I never knew him. Therefore, I got a lot of pleasure to see his brother today. Thank you once again.
Louisa Spivack <louspiv@yahoo.co.uk>
- Tuesday, January 31, 2006 at 03:38:22 (EST)
seth persky (perskys@comcast.net) on Monday, Message: discovered your site as i am compiling family history. wow! my name is seth persky, son of marshall and sheila persky. i live in the detroit area. i am trying to find information out on my father's side of the family, persky. his mother and father were rita persky (rita Singer before marriage/ family named was Persinger before arriving in america) and Samuel Persky, who died when my father was just 9 years old (would have been around 1953). i know virtually nothing about him. my grandmother recently died and in looking through old photos, no one seemed to recognize anyone. i know little to nothing about my family history, other than they came from Lithuania. have found some helpful information on this website but little else on internet. there is an old family story how one of my ancestors was a guard for the tsar, and when he was killed, the family came to america, but have little information on the name, the area, etc... any help or direction would be g! really appreciated-------------------------------
seth persky <perskys@comcast.net>
USA - Tuesday, January 31, 2006 at 03:34:36 (EST)
Keith Levit (klevit@shaw.ca) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: Comment Home Page: http://www.keithlevitphotography.com Message: You may be interested in my return to the shtetl web-site http://www.keithlevitphotography.com/exhibitions/shtetlindex.html It was an amazing journey back to my roots - my zaida Velodie Levit and baba Malke karasick
Keith Levit (klevit@shaw.ca)
- Tuesday, January 31, 2006 at 03:31:10 (EST)
From the internet; Hello, My grandfather's name was Yudel Mendel Winner or Wiener/Wienner. He came over from Minsk with his sister, my tante Becka (Rebecca). His mom's name was Hilda and my cousin says the husband was Gordon ( Gutel). She was a stern one! He had 4 sisters and we lost contact with them after WW2. Hilda and Gordon previously had managed an apple orchard in Minsk. Does this make any sense? Yudel and my baube lived in St.Albans, Vt. They had 10 children (3died at birth, one was mentallly retarded). Make any more sense? My cousin is also looking for those missing sisters--one married Ytzhak Shpringer? Any infor would be appreciated------------- Hello! I'm Phyllis Grodzinsky and my grandfather was Julius (Judel Mendel) Winner. It wasn't originally Winner and I've been scouring the Ellis Isle Website (can't remember how to get back there!) for a Wiener,Wienner, Weiner, Weinner to no avail. He had 5 sisters and I understand he came over with my Tante Becca ( Rebecca Winner married David Barofsky and settled in Elkton, MD.) from Minsk. I guess his parents managed an orchard around there and I guess Minsk was not such a good area for the Jews) (was there any good area?) We don't know what happened to the 4 other sisters. I guess my cousin Bonnie says that one of them married a Springer (interesting, like Jerry) --------------------------- Dear Phyllis, I spoke to Shepsel Shpringer ( born in 1923) today. He told me that his mother; Shifra nee Winer, had a brother Yehuda Winer in America who had many children. He also knows of a sister of his mother who came to America. Three Winer sisters did not come to America. His mother Shifra married Ytzhak Shpringer and Lived in Horodok with 8 children, Only he survived as a partisan and later in the Red Army ( two of his brothers were with him and killed as fighters. Another sister married a Shpsenwol and lived in Horodok with 7 children. They all perished. One married a Zoldin and lived in Minsk. He found her son after the war and they are in touch with the children in Minsk. The family Winer originated in a tiny town east of Minsk Shepsel Shpringer has a son ( Ytzhak Shpringer) and a daughter. He has six grandchildren and some great grandchildren. He was always hoping to find the family of his mother in America and was unable sine Winer is a common name.
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- Sunday, January 29, 2006 at 14:39:31 (EST)
Yves Sobel (webmaster@levinas100.org) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Message: Congratulations for this exceptionally valuable and informative site! May I suggest you add the outstanding philosopher Emmanuel Levinas born in Kovno on January 12, 1906. Numerous events and international conferences in the World, including Kovno, celebrate the 100th anniversary of his birth. You can find them on a dedicated website: http://www.levinas100.org Message: You can find data and pictures on members of Levinas family from Kovno on the following web pages: http://www.levinas100.org/01freres.html http://www.levinas100.org/00DVEIRE.html http://www.levinas100.org/00JECHIE2.html http://www.levinas100.org/biogr.html Links to more pages on Emmanuel Levinas: http://www.levinas100.org/liens.html
http://www.levinas100.org
- Sunday, January 29, 2006 at 01:49:47 (EST)
Phyllis Grodzinsky Winstead (Psherryred1@verizon.net) Message: Hello! I believe Shepsel (Sabtai)Shpringer to be my second cousin. I believe my mgf Julius (Judel Mendel Winer or Vainer) was his mother's brother. His mother's (Shifra) parents, of course were my great grandparents, Godel and Hilda (Hinda). I used to stare at their picture over the wall in my grandmother's guest bedroom! Julius was the only male with about five sisters and no one even knew their names. Just that all correspondence stopped abruptly and no one ever heard from them again. All me and my cousin Bonnie Mogelever Pollack had was a name Tzak or Jack Shpringer until I went on the Yad Vashem website and pulled up a memory and a tragedy knowing that Shepsel had siblings that also perished. I read that he was a partisan. That would be typical for the "tough as nails" Winner (my grandfather changed his name) side of the family. If anyone has any info please, please, e-mail me double quick. I'm 51 and there is so much more I need to know!! Phyllis ---------------------------------------------------------- It seems that Shepsel had 4 older brothers and 3 much younger brothers ( only one was a girl named for her grandmother; Hinda). Shpringer Ytzkhak Ytzkhak Shpringer was born in Zawiercie, Poland in 1885. He was an argriculturist ( horses) and married to Shifra. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Ytzkhak perished in 1943 in Horodok, Poland at the age of 58. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1990 by his son Shepsel/ Shabtai Shpringer. 115 Rothchild Street, Petach Tikva Shpringer Shifra Shifra Shpringer nee Winer was born in Russia in 1897 to Gutl and Hinda. She was a housewife and married to Ytzkhak. Prior to WWII she lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Shifra perished in 1943 in Horodok, Poland at the age of 46. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 01/01/1990 by her son Shepsel/ Shabtai Shpringer. 115 Rothchild Street, Petach Tikva Shpringer Yaakov Yaakov Shpringer was born in Horodok, Poland in 1915. He was an argriculturist. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Army, Ussr. Yaakov perished in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 01/01/1990 by his brother Shpringer Faive Faive Shpringer was born in Horodok, Poland in 1918 to Ytzkhak and Shifra nee Winer. He was an argriculturist. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Army, Ussr. Faive perished in 1941 in the Shoah at the age of 23. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1990 by his brother Shpringer Dodel ( David) Dodel Shpringer was born in Horodok, Poland in 1921. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Dodel perished in Horodok, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 01/01/1990 by his brother Henek Shpringer was born in Horodok, Poland in 1922 to Ytzkhak and Shifra nee Winer. He was a pupil. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Army, Ussr. Henek perished in 1944 in the Shoah at the age of 22 as soldier in the Red Army. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 01/01/1990 by his brother Gutel Shpringer was born in Horodok, Poland in 1932.he was a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. he perished in 1942 in Horodok, Poland at the age of 10. This information is based on a Page of Testimony ( submitted on 01/01/1990 by his brother. Hinde Shpringer was born in Horodok, Poland in 1936 to Ytzkhak and Shifra nee Winer. She was a pupil and a child. Prior to WWII she lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Hinde perished in Horodok, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 01/01/1990 by her Zalman Shpringer was born in Horodok, Poland in 1938 to Ytzkhak and Shifra nee Winer. He was a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Zalman perished in Horodok, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony (displayed on left) submitted on 01/01/1990 by his brother.
Phyllis Grodzinsky Winstead <Psherryred1@verizon.net>
- Sunday, January 29, 2006 at 01:47:09 (EST)
David Eberiel (David_Eberiel@uml.edu) -- Message: My grandfather immigrated to the U. S. around 1904 from llja. His name was Jeschiel Eberiel(Changed to Julius Eberiel in the U.S.). I have a copy of the manifest of the ship he came in on. Any information on him before(or after) he immigated would be appreciated. Please e-mail: David_Eberiel@uml.edu
David Eberiel
- Friday, January 27, 2006 at 14:39:06 (EST)
Message: who has information about the Joseph and Leah Upin family from Seda, Lithuania. In 1920 Leah Upin came to the United States wih 6 children, Marion, Jennie, Sarah, Saul, Orrin and Samuel. Charles and Otto preceded their mother to the United States.Joseph was deceased. We are looking for any known relatives of this family. We know of no siblings nor their decendants of either Joseph or Leah. All of that generation are now deceased but our children are interested in knowing extended family. Does this sound familiar to anyone? http://www.assetprotection.pisem.net From: ernic66ernic@hotmail.com (Remo Rimo)
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USA - Tuesday, January 24, 2006 at 13:19:17 (EST)
bonnie mogelever pollack-- frederick, Md---- Bopollack@aol.com ---- Shpringer Ytzkhak-- Ytzkhak Shpringer was born in Zawiercie, Poland in 1885. He was a farmer and married to Shifra. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. I need help understanding who to contact about this person or persons related who are listed. I the oldest grandchild of Julius Winner (Yudel Mendel Winer) son of Gordon and Hinda parents of Yitzhak Springers wife Shifra. Julius was one of 5 children, the only son. His sister married Yitzhak Springer and the correspondences stopped around 1941 or so. Last words, "things are getting really bad." My cousin alerted me to the Yad Vashem site and the name. All facts match. I do not know how to contact the person who posted the information in the guestbook. Any information would be appreciated.
bonnie mogelever pollack
USA - Tuesday, January 24, 2006 at 12:59:31 (EST)
Lionel Rogosin was the son of Israel who was an HONORARY CHAIRMEN of Anshei Volozhin; with Irving Bunim and Samuel Rudin. from the internet; Lionel Rogosin remembered: --Friends and fans gathered at the Anthology Film Archive on July 13, 2001 to recall the life and work of Lionel Rogosin, whom John Cassavetes once called "probably the greatest documentary filmmaker of all time." The memorial for Rogosin, whose grandfather was a Talmudist from Volozhin ; Shalom Eliezer Ragosin , was followed by a screening of "On the Bowery" (1956), Rogosin's close-up look at the poor on skid row. Seen: Rogosin's sons, Daniel, a Los Angeles filmmaker, and Michael, an artist living in Angers, France; Michael's wife, Pascale Rivault Rogosin, a teacher, and 14- year-old son Elliot; and Robert Downey.
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- Tuesday, January 24, 2006 at 12:50:33 (EST)
Philanthropist Andrea Bronfman killed in road accident in NY ------------- By Amiram Barkat, Haaretz Correspondent ----------- Andrea Bronfman, the wife of Jewish Canadian billionaire Charles Bronfman, was killed in a traffic accident in New York Monday. Bronfman was hit by a passing car during a morning walk near her apartment. Her funeral will be held on Friday on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem. Acting Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and Vice Premier Shimon Peres, who are friends of the family, were notified of her death. In 2002, when Olmert was mayor of Jerusalem, he gave Andrea Bronfman the key to the city. Advertisement Andrea Bronfman was born in Britain in 1945 to parents who were active in the Zionist Movement. Her father, Haim Morrison, headed the United Jewish Appeal in the U.K. In June 1982, she married Charles. The couple did not have children together and Bronfman had three children from a previous marriage. The couple used to divide their time between New York and Jerusalem, where they would stay in Bronfman's parents' apartment in the Talbieh neighborhood. The Bronfmans are among the world's leading Jewish philanthropists. The Andrea and Charles Bronfman Foundation supports a broad spectrum of organizations and institutions in the field of education, welfare and strengthening Jewish identity. Andrea Bronfman was an art collector who devoted much of her time to supporting cultural institutions and artists. She was also active in the campaign for Soviet Jewry. The couple also invested in Israel's business sector over the years and are among the owners of the Koor concern. Jewish Agency chair Ze'ev Bielsky said Bronfman's death was "a huge loss to the Jewish people and Israel." The birthright program, of which Bronfman was one of the founders, said "Andrea's death is a terrible loss." The World Jewish Congress today joined Jews in communities around the world in mourning the untimely passing of Andrea Bronfman. "Andrea Bronfman was a pillar of her family and the entire Jewish community. She was an activist as well as a philanthropist," said Israel Singer and Stephen E. Herbits, chairman of the World Jewish Congress Policy Council and secretary-general. "Her way was that of the Jewish matriarchs and her passing leaves a void that can never be filled... She was cut off in the prime of her life," they added.
.
- Monday, January 23, 2006 at 19:16:02 (EST)
Subject: ROSNER From Krakow From: Abuwasta Abuwasta Date: Thu, 19 Jan 2006 08:24:15 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1 My name is Jacob Rosen from Jerusalem. I am the son of the late Leon Leib Rosner (1903-1999) who was the youngest child of Jakub Chiel Rosner and Ittla Borgenicht. My father was convinced until his death that he was the only survivor from his family and barely spoke about his brother and 4 sisters. He never mentioned their given names or married names. Last year I managed to find out that a son of my father's sister Channa, Reuven Orschutzer (b.1925), survived and lives in Israel. He gave me the names of the other siblings of my father. Following that I discovered via Yad Vashem that the son of his brother Abraham Meyer, Rudy (b.1920), survived as well and lives in Florida. We reunited last year in Jerusalem (they had not seen each other since 1938). Now I have more or less the list of my father's siblings: 1. Abraham Meyer b. 1890 in Gdow .Disappeared in the USSR. 2. Channa Orschutzer b. 1894/5 in Gdow. Perished in the Holocaust. 3. Erna /Esther Susskind b.1896? in Gdow .Perished in the Holocaust. 4. Beila /Berta (surname unknown) b. 1897-9 married and lived in Tarnow. Perished in the Holocaust Mechla/ Michalina b.1901 in Dobczyce. Was a Communist,married at a certain stage(surname unknown). Disappeared in USSR. 5. Leon Leib b. 1903 in Dobczyce (my father). My grandfather Jakub Chiel Rosner after whom I am named was born in 1866 in Dabrowa Tarnowska to Rubin Rosner and Malka Perlberg. My grandfather moved around 1905 to Krakowwhere he had a big storehouse of coal. My two surviving cousins are named after our ggrandfather Rubin. Mechla/Michalina is probably named after our ggrandmother Malka. All this info was constructed from www.shoreshim.org, JRI-PL, Yad Vashem and my cousins' memory. I wonder whether any one of you came across these names and may shed some light on the two aunts of me whose married names are not known to me. Thanks.
Jacob Rosen
Jerusalem, - Saturday, January 21, 2006 at 17:55:06 (EST)
debra rosen (bubehzeldeh@msn.com) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Message: looking for members of Rosen family tree that originated from minsk.Information,history.Great grandfather was a schochet
Debra Rosen <bubehzeldeh@msn.com>
USA - Saturday, January 14, 2006 at 12:59:46 (EST)
From:  weorion64@AOL.com (Walter G Eife) Message: Hi My surname is Eife and I have located the name in list of survivors at a Vilnius camp of WW2 ---Can anyone tell me the origin of the name ? My great grand father Johann Eife was born in Wetter Hesse Germany around 1840 --he left Hamburg for the USA and arrived in 1860/61 --He was then enlisted into the Union Army in an entire German outfit --the 75th PA VOlInf and he served throughout the civil war and was interrred as a POW in the Andersonville Ga camp---Here it gets ocnfusing as he later married in the Presbyterian church in Philadelphia Pa---I also have census info and also info from Ellis IS that Eife's from Russia came to the USA and listed as religion Hebrew ---Somehow finding roots is so interesting ----thanks for any help Walter G Eife
Walter G Eife
- Monday, January 09, 2006 at 10:47:26 (EST)
From:  fulbirdi@aol.com (Richard S. Rome) ---- I believe I am a great grandson of one Shmuel Rome, whose son, Abraham Rome(or some Ellis Island variant of our unknown original name) had a brother , Aaron, murdered in a pogrom around 1905. Abraham immediately fled to the U.S. via Britain where relatives named Solomon kept him briefly. Soon after arriving in NYC, he moved on to New Haven, CT, married Fanny Solomon of Brighton Beach and raised a son, Sol (Solly, Zerach, my father) in New Haven. Do we have records of Zuslav gubernia? I'm desperate for more geneology but also would love to trace Grandpa's passage out of Lithuania. I suppose he could have sailed from anywhere- Melmel, Riga, who knows? As an interesting incidental, my maternal great grandfather, Avram Goldstein from Kiev, emmigrated with De Hirsch funds to Oxbow, Saskatchuan, before 1900 but eventually settled in New Haven and constructed all the housing around Yale University
Richard S. Rome
- Monday, January 09, 2006 at 10:45:06 (EST)
Dear Eilat,------------------- I happened on your site while googling a shtetl. It's really incredible!! Does the rest of the world who are doing their roots know about it? Do the folks at Jewishgen.org know about it at least? I noticed the "Gordin" in your name. One of my great uncles, who I'm trying to track down might have used the name Gordan after leaving Russia. His brother definitely used it after he went to Egypt around the turn of the century (late 1800's). The name used by my great uncle here in the U.S. was "Rubin." Have you traced yourself to Any Rubins, or Calofs, or Adelman? My gg grandfather was named "Abraham Adelman" here in the U.S. He settled with his wife Razel and family in Devils Lake North Dakota. They lived near the Calofs (which is rumoured to be our family name before Adelman), and the Mills and Soslofskys. If any of this rings any bells, I'd love to hear from you. Regards, Wm Adelman Los Angeles
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- Wednesday, January 04, 2006 at 22:56:48 (EST)
Thanks you for your wonderful website. My father was Avrom Chaim Chanowicz and was born in 1911 in Minsk, but spent the first 11 years of his life in Horodok. His parents were Golda and Ben Zion Chanowicz. They eventually emigrated to NYC.
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- Sunday, January 01, 2006 at 12:49:10 (EST)
Do you have old family letters written in Yiddish? ...Is it impossible to read them? Do you want to know what your ancestors lives were like in the Shtetl? I specialize in translating Yiddish handwritten letters, postcards, printed newspaper articles, Yizkor books, and the like. I translate these into understandable English while retaining their original flavor. Address: Mindle Crystel Gross 8870 Boatswain Drive Boynton Beach, Florida 33436 ---------------------------- Phone: 561.369.1854---------- Email: marv144@aol.com
Mindle Crystel Gross
Boynton Beach, Florida - Sunday, January 01, 2006 at 12:06:53 (EST)
From: pedroalper@2vias.com.ar (pedro alperowicz) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Home Page: http:// Message: Querida Eilat: Por fin voy a cumplir el sueño de visitar Israel.El día 20 de Enero llego con mi esposa Laura y voy a poder concretar el encuentro tan deseado con Edna Litvak ,la prima de mi padre Mauricio Alperowicz. Debo agradecerte a ti porque a través de esta maravillosa página lograste contactarnos. Nunca voy a olvidar nuestro encuentro en New York y las charlas que mantuvimos. Será un orgullo para mí poder encontrarme con otra gente de Kurenetz,por eso al que lea estas notas (aunque estén en español)y desee escribirme con todo gusto le responderé. El año que viene en Jerusalem. Recibe un gran abrazo. Pedro Alperowicz Buenos Aires Argentina
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- Friday, December 30, 2005 at 12:01:38 (EST)
Shalom Leon, I have been talking to Dan Mendelson of Rehovot who studied in the Dolhinov Tarbut school during the years 1935- 1937. He lived at the home of Shmuel Alperovitz ( his daughter was Chaia Sade of Ramat Hakovesh. Her husband is alive in the Kibbutz and is now age 96! !- Dan Mendelson had relatives; Rudel Kaidanow,( sister of his uncle, Chaim Klotz of Ilja) and her children; Chaim and Alper who lived in Dolhinov. Could you ask the older people if they know anything about them? I did not find them on the list. I know that there was a  Kaidanow family in Krivichi. There son ; Jerry ( a survivor) wrote me. I think that he said that his family was from Dolhinov. Thanks, Eilat -------------------- Shalom Eilat, I tried to find some answers to your queries. Yes, there was a Kaidanov family in Dolhinov, this was Laibe and Rutke Kaidanov with their three children: Shirle, Chaim and as you mentioned probably Alper ( I could not find out what was his exact name ). Laibe Kaidanov was Jerry Kaidanov's uncle ( Jerry and his brother survived and they live in the New York area). Rutke Kaidanov as it turned out was a cousin of my father Gavriel Rubin, she had siblings: Michle, Faigl and Avrom-Ele. All of them were murdered by the Germans in Dolhinov. I hope I was of some help. Have a happy Chanukah Holiday. Chag Sameach, Leon Rubin
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- Sunday, December 25, 2005 at 11:21:51 (EST)
Sam Weisbord was born in New York in 9- 21- 1911 To Jacob Weisbord and Goldie nee Kaufman ( born in 1888). His parents were Jewish immigrants from Russia. They came to the U.S c 1890 as children They married in 1907. They had 3 children; Abraham, born in New York in 1908 was an artist, Sam and Mildred born in 1916. The family was involved in the Dairy business. They owned a dairy store.Sam was still a child when his father passed away. By 1930 their 22 Years old cousin Nettie lived with them at the home they owned ( $ 12,000 in 1930). Sam was a book keeper in his youth. Sam Weisbord was the President of the William Morris Agency. He passed away in Los Angeles on 05/07/1986
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- Wednesday, December 21, 2005 at 19:52:50 (EST)
Anne McAdam (velvetblue@rogers.com) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: Comment Home Page: http:// Message: Dear whoever this information can be of use to: This is regarding your question of who knows anything about Sam Weisbord, who lived in Los Angeles, California 90069. Sam was the President of the William Morris Theatrical Agency, the most prestigious in the business, and I was his executive secretary for three years, from 1976 to 1979. He was quite a character, quite well known for his savvy business knowledge, and for his idiosyncrasies....if someone there is interested and wants to e-mail me directly, I can relate some amusing and heartwarming stories about Sam. I liked him very much. I was much distressed to learn of his death; at that time I was married and no longer working for him. I hope this helps. Anne
Anne McAdam <velvetblue@rogers.com>
USA - Wednesday, December 21, 2005 at 18:43:18 (EST)
From: ASilberf@aol.com Subject: Rubinstein information -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I am trying to locate Eilat Gordon Levitan for information on the Silberfeld-Rubinstein connection. My great Aunt Gitel Silberfeld was the mother of Helena Rubinstein and I am trying to learn why Arthur Rubinstein, the concert pianist was on Mr. Levitan's Web site on the Rubinstein family. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. Alfred M. Silberfeld, Founder, President Emeritus and Life Member Jewish Genealogical Society of Palm Beach County Inc. Past Supreme Representative and 54 year Life Member Knights of Pythias. --------------------
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- Tuesday, December 13, 2005 at 19:00:59 (EST)
This is no fish tale: Gefilte tastes tell story of ancestry---- BILL GLADSTONE--- Jewish Telegraphic Agency---- TORONTO -- How do you like your gefilte fish: sweet or peppery? The answer may reveal more about yourself and your family history than you might think. You've heard of the Mason-Dixon Line? The 49th parallel? Well, there's also the "gefilte fish line" separating the Eastern European regions where Jewish palates once favored the sweet, from those that preferred the peppery varieties of the tasty traditional dish. Michael Steinlauf, who teaches Jewish studies at Gratz College in Philadelphia, told this to an audience at the 19th annual International Conference on Jewish Genealogy in New York last month. With some 1,200 participants, this year's conference was by far the largest to date, indicating the continued mushrooming of interest in genealogy among Jews. The "gefilte fish line" ran though eastern Poland. Jews living to the west -- most of Poland, as well as Germany and the rest of Western Europe -- ate the sweet gefilte fish. Those to the east -- Lithuania, Latvia and Russia -- ate the peppery version. But Steinlauf's tale is not just a fish story. It's also about language. He said the "gefilte fish line" roughly overlaps another important line: a linguistic divide between two major variants of Yiddish. Like Henry Higgins, the professor from "My Fair Lady" who could place Londoners by their accents, Yiddish linguists can determine a person's native region by his pronunciation of certain words. It should come as no surprise, therefore, that Jews' taste buds carry significant clues about their origins. Steinlauf wasn't the only speaker at the New York gathering to urge family-tree researchers to look around their own dinner tables and elsewhere in their homes for clues about the past. Rafael Guber, an American genealogist, artist and curatorial designer, spoke about "Using Documents and Ephemera to Retrace Your Ancestors' Footsteps." Old prayerbooks, marriage contracts, ritual washing cups and phylacteries are among the items that may help understand how and where one's ancestors lived, Guber said. Prayerbooks, for instance, may indicate whether one's ancestors were Ashkenazim or Sephardim, and if Ashkenazim, whether they were Chassidim or their opponents, the Mitnagdim. Displaying photographs of various types of head coverings worn in the Old World, Guber indicated when and where each regional variant of the fashion could be found. Even a tombstone in an old photograph can offer a geographical clue, he explained, since only in central and western Galicia did tombstone carvers place clearly visible inset stones within larger tombstones. Guber ended his talk with a Jewish version of the popular British TV program "Antiques Roadshow," inviting audience members to come forward with documents, photographs and other ephemera for instant and public evaluation. The boom in Jewish genealogy began in 1977 with the establishment in New York of the first postwar Jewish genealogical society. Today there are more than 80 such societies around the world, including groups in Belarus, Sweden, Jamaica and Brazil. One of the most successful innovations within the genealogical community has been JewishGen -- www.jewishgen.org -- an Internet information service that started in 1986 as a bulletin board for 150 people. It now sends out 30,000 pieces of e-mail daily and receives some 3 million hits on its Web site every day -- an increase of more than 600 percent over last year. Next year's Jewish genealogy conference is scheduled to take place in Salt Lake City in the summer of 2000. http://www.jewishsf.com/content/2-0-/module/displaystory/story_id/12012/format/html/displaystory.html
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- Tuesday, December 13, 2005 at 18:48:55 (EST)
School told Nobel Prize winner in economics, `You're no good at math, try auto mechanics' ------------ By Tamara Traubman ------ At the yeshiva high school where he studied, he was told he was not very good in mathematics, and they advised him to choose something simpler, like auto mechanics. But yesterday, Professor Robert Aumann received the Nobel Prize in Economics for his mathematical research into game theory, together with American Thomas Schelling. Aumann, a professor at Hebrew University, received the $1.3 million prize from the hand of Sweden's king at a ceremony in Stockholm. Following the ceremony, the recipients were hosted at a festive dinner attended by diplomats, politicians, businessmen and members of the royal family. Aumann arrived in Sweden with his 35 children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, as well as his new bride, Batya, the sister of his deceased first wife. "We had tears in our eyes," said his son, Yonatan. "It doesn't matter that we've known for a long time already; the excitement was enormous." According to the official announcement, Aumann and Schelling received the prize "for having enhanced our understanding of conflict and cooperation through game-theory analysis." In remarks during the ceremony, the judges elaborated on this, crediting Aumann with having shown that when a particular situation repeats itself, the very fact that it does so provides opportunities for cooperation, even between parties to a conflict. "War is not irrational," Aumann said earlier last week, adding that military preparedness is the best way to prevent war. "During the long, dark days of the Cold War, peace was maintained because airplanes carrying nuclear weapons were in the air 24 hours a day." Two of Aumann's relatives went to Stockholm a week early to ensure that the arrangements would meet the Orthodox prize winner's religious requirements. In addition to arranging kosher food, they had to ensure that his tuxedo did not contain a forbidden mixture of linen and wool and rent a room near the hall where the ceremony would take place so that he would be able to set out after the end of Shabbat and still arrive on time. At the ceremony, awards were handed out to the prize winners not only in economics, but also in medicine, physics, chemistry and literature. In medicine, the award went to Australians Barry Marshall and Robin Warren for proving that ulcers were caused by bacteria rather than stress. The literature prize went to British playwright Harold Pinter, who is ill with cancer and was therefore unable to attend, but gave a prerecorded speech in which he attacked U.S. President George W. Bush and British Prime Minister Tony Blair over the war in Iraq. Mohamed ElBaradei and the International Atomic Energy Agency, of which he is the director general, jointly received the Nobel Peace Prize earlier yesterday. In his acceptance speech, ElBaradei said that if the world is to survive, there is no place for nuclear weapons in it. Therefore, he said, we must ensure both that no country obtains nuclear weapons, and that those that already have them, destroy them. Peace prize awards are often controversial, and this year's was no exception: The Greenpeace organization demonstrated both Friday and yesterday against the award to the IAEA, arguing that even nonmilitary uses of atomic energy, which it is the agency's job to promote, ought to be banned, as nuclear energy is dangerous both to the environment and to human beings. However, it is rare for the scientific prizes to arouse controversy. Thus the opposition to Aumann and Schelling's award was exceptional: Close to 1,000 people, including several dozen Israelis, signed a petition proclaiming it "monstrous" to award a Nobel prize to "two war-mongers." The petition charged that the theory developed by Schelling encouraged the use of military force and helped inspire the U.S. bombing campaign during the Vietnam War, and it accused Aumann, who is right of center politically and belongs to the rightist organization Professors for a Strong Israel, of using game theory to justify Israeli control over the territories. Last year, two Israelis, Professors Aaron Ciechanover and Avram Hershko, won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. In 2002, Professor Daniel Kahneman, an Israeli working at Princeton University, was one of the winners of the economics prize. A week's hard Labor Amir Peretz's emergency meeting of the 'security shadow cabinet' was ridiculed. Russians vs. Netanyahu Russian immigrants won't forgive Netanyahu, but won't vote for Peretz either. Today Online Ex-Shin Bet chief sued in U.S. over Hamas assassination Responses: 298 World slams Iran's Holocaust denial Responses: 370 Abbas is wasting the chance for peace Responses: 186 Congress to Abbas: Hamas or financial aid Responses: 76 More Headlines 22:16 Israeli professor awarded Nobel Prize in Stockholm 23:50 IDF finds tunnel used for smuggling terrorists from Gaza to Israel 00:11 Two men shot dead, another wounded in Jaffa clan warfare 20:33 Palestinian dies from wounds incurred in Thurs. IAF airstrike 19:03 Adalah boycotts forum due to presence of ex-police chief
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- Sunday, December 11, 2005 at 13:41:44 (EST)
Kira Pilat (kirushka29@yahoo.com) on Friday, December 09, 2005 at 17:25:01 Message: May the memory of your loved ones live on forever! My surname is Pilat too. The lineage is from Slovakia.
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. - Friday, December 09, 2005 at 22:00:47 (EST)
Theodore Joel (Ted) Shoolman was a son of a native of Kurenets; Max Shoolman ------------------ Theodore Joel (Ted) Shoolman of Lighthouse Point, Fla. and Brookline died Saturday, Oct. 15, 2005, at his home in Brookline. He was 86. Mr. Shoolman grew up in Brookline and Marblehead, graduated from Harvard in 1941 and was an aviation cadet in World War II. After a brief career in the movie industry in Hollywood, Shoolman became a real estate developer like his father, Max Shoolman, who built the Metropolitan Theater, now known as the Wang Center, in Boston's theater district. Mr. Shoolman was one of the developers of the controversial Charles River Park residential complex near downtown Boston The upscale Charles River Park was built on 48 acres of the old West End neighborhood after it was cleared for redevelopment in the late 1950s. Critics said it was urban renewal run amok. The gritty neighborhood was home to 10,000 residents, but developers and city officials argued that the new complex would boost Boston's real estate economy and revitalize the city. The apartment and condominium complex, which includes Longfellow Place towers, today is home to 5,000 people. Developers in 1999 sold the last large piece of the complex for about $240 million to Chicago-based Equity Residential Properties Trust. Charles River Park is bounded by North Station, the Charles River, Beacon Hill, and Government Center. To read about Mr. Shoolman go to http://www.rejournal.com/ne/Profiles/Profiles/Theodoreshoolman1967.htm
http://www.rejournal.com/ne/Profiles/Profiles/Theodoreshoolman1967.htm
- Monday, December 05, 2005 at 12:36:15 (EST)
Eliezer Lurie was born in Birzai, Lithuania to Moshe Eliyahu and Miriam. He was a merchant and married to Sara nee Even. Prior to WWII he lived in Birzai, Lithuania. Eliezer died in 1941 in Birzai, Lithuania at the age of 60. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/08/1955 by his brothers' son in law; Submitter's Last Name* LEVIN Submitter's First Name ARIE ------------------- Tzvi Lurie was born in Birzai, Lithuania to Moshe Eliahu and Miriam. He was a grain merchant and married to Tema. Prior to WWII he lived in Birzai, Lithuania. During the war was in Birzai, Lithuania. Tzvi died in 1941 in Birzai, Lithuania at the age of 70. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/08/1955 by his relative ------------------ Aharon Yaakov Lurie was born in Birzai, Lithuania to Moshe Eliyahu and Miriam. He was a grain merchant and married to Mina Rivka nee Feibush . During the war was in Birzi, Lithuania. Aharon died in Birzai, Lithuania at the age of 60. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/08/1955 by his son-in-law. Submitter's Last Name* LEVIN Submitter's First Name ARIE from Herzlia -------------- Bentzion Lurie was born in Birzai, Lithuania to Tzvi and Tema. He was a grain merchant and single. Bentzion died in Birzai, Lithuania at the age of 25. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/08/1955 by his relative. -------------------- Sara Lurie was born in Birz, Lithuania to Yisrael and Rakhel Even. She was a housewife and married to Eliezer. Prior to WWII she lived in Birzai, Lithuania. During the war was in Birz, Lithuania. Sara died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/06/1955 by her niece from Israel- ( daughter of her sister); Batia Friedman of Kibbutz Yagur ------------------------- Khasia Lurie was born in Birzai, Lithuania to Tzvi and Tema. She was a sales person and single. Prior to WWII she lived in Birzai, Lithuania. During the war was in Birzai, Lithuania. Khasia died in 1941 in Birzai, Lithuania at the age of 23. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/08/1955 by her relative.
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- Sunday, December 04, 2005 at 12:02:46 (EST)
Gail Samowitz (gsamowitz@yahoo.com) Message: My name is Gail Samowitz and my father Abraham Chanovich was born in Gorodok in 1911. He lived there between 1911 and 1922 with his mother and her family. Dad and his mother joined my grandfather in NYC in 1922. I suspect there was more family in Gorodok who lost their lives in the Holocaust. My grandmother's family were the Berezowicz's listed in the 1929 Gorodok directory as a butcher. Please contact me if you are connected to this family.
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- Sunday, December 04, 2005 at 11:36:03 (EST)
In 1850 there were about 17,000 Jews living in America. By 1880 there were about 270,000 Jews. Most of these Jews lived in the New York area, which at this time had a Jewish population of 180,000. It would soon grow to 1.8 million. In New York City, the Jewish area was the Lower East Side of Manhattan. The ones who made it quickly moved up to the Upper East Side. And these Jews did remarkably well in the New World. Some famous names of those who made it rich quick were: Marcus Goldman, founder of Goldman, Sachs & Co. Charles Bloomingdale, founder of Bloomingdale's department store Henry, Emanuel and Mayer Lehman, founders of Lehman Brothers Abraham Kuhn and Solomon Loeb, founders of the banking firm Kuhn, Loeb and Co. Jacob Schiff, Loeb's son-in-law , a major finacier Joseph Seligman, who started out as a peddler and became one of the most prominent bankers, the Mandel brothers of Chicago. and more.....
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- Sunday, December 04, 2005 at 11:30:57 (EST)
Notes from the Belarus sig ( Jewishgen)-- .....To Dr. Ioffe's article I would add Abraham Menachem Mendel Ussishkin [1863-1941], one of the leaders of the First Zionist Congress in 1893 and president of the Jewish National Fund from 1917 until his death. He was born in Dubrovno, a little town southeast of Vitebsk. The name Ussishkin derives from the Usisa River that flows through the town of Gorodok north of Vitebsk and into the Obol River. -- Z. Usiskin
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USA - Tuesday, November 29, 2005 at 14:47:46 (EST)
The role of Belarusian Jews in creating the state of Israel - An article of Dr. Ioffe from Minsk----could be found at; - http://www.open.by/belarus-now/cont/1998/0512/politics/4.html............. Some information from the site..... ....There were a lot of Belarusian Jews among those Zionist activists who performed the great practical work to create in Palestine the independent Jewish state. One of the leaders of the international Zionist movement and the first president of the state of Israel was a native of the place of Motol in Kobrin region of Grodno province (now the village of Motol in Ivanovo region of Brest oblast) Chaim Weizmann (1874-1952). His father Ozer was a rafter and had 15 children. Chaim was the third one. After receiving a traditional Jewish education and graduating from a vocational school in Pinsk he studied Chemistry in Germany and Switzerland. Mr Weizmann got his doctor's degree in 1897, when he was only 23 years old. A year before he joined Zionist movement , and in 1897 he took part in the World Zionist Congress. In 1920-1931 and in 1935-1946 Mr Weizmann was elected the President of the World Zionist Organisation. His ebullient activities contributed to the creation in the British Army of the Jewish brigade at the end of the Second World War. In 1947 Mr Weizmann as a member of a Jewish delegation took an active part in the work of the General Assembly of the United Nations, which discussed a question of Palestine dividing into two independent states - Jewish and Arabic. One can consider as Mr Weizmann's diplomatic merits the including of the Negev areas in the territory of the future Jewish state proposed by the United Nations, and the promoting of the US recognition of the state of Israel. On May 14, 1948, at a day of the new state creation, President of the United States Harry Truman in response to Mr H. Weizmann's personal letter confirmed the recognition of Israel by the United States, and at the end of the same memorable day there appeared a telegram from the leaders of labour parties of the country, which said about their wish to nominate Weizmann's candidacy for the presidency of the state of Israel. Exactly this person secured the promise of the US President to finance the start of economic development of the new state by granting it a $100 million privileged loan, as well as to establish full diplomatic relations with Israel immediately after forming the first democratic government of the country. First, Chaim Weizmann was elected the President of the Provisional State Council of the country, and in February, 1949 - the first President of the state of Israel. One of the largest scientific centres in the country - a scientific and research institute in Rachovota was named after him, on the territory of which (in the garden of his house) he was buried. The place of Vishnevo in Oshmyany region of Vilno province (now the village of Vishnevo in Volozhin region of Minsk oblast) gave to the world a Zionism leader Nachum Goldman (1895-1982). When he was 24, he defended his thesis and got the degree of Doctor of Law, and when he was 25 - the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. In 1936 Nachum Goldman become one of the founders of the World Jewish Congress. He was the first chairman of its Executive Council, and in 1949-1978 - the president of the World Jewish Congress. At the beginning of the Second World War, Nachum Goldman moved to New York, where he began the propaganda and fight for the immediate creation of the independent Jewish state. In 1948-1956 he was the chairman of the Executive Committee of the Zionist Organisation. On all of his responsible chairs Nachum Goldman did his best to promote the creation and international recognition of the state of Israel. Abba Achimeir (Abba Shaul Geisinovich) was one of the leaders of the Zionists-revisionists, an ideologist of the revisionist movement's most radical wing, a politician and a talented publicist. He was born in 1898 in the village of Dolgoe in Soligorsk region. In 1928, when he lived in Palestine, Abba Achimeir joined Zionists-revisionists and became a supporter of active resistance to British mandate authorities. In 1935 he was arrested and imprisoned for organising the illegal "Rebels Union" (Brit-gabirionim). Abba Achimeir's views have significantly influenced the shaping of Ezel and Lechi underground combat organisations' ideology. He died in 1962. The native of the town of Bobruisk, Berl Kaznelson (1887-1944) became the leader and ideologist of the Zionism labour movement. His aim was to create an independent Jewish state in Erez-Israel, in which the society of equal workers will own the land and natural resources. In 1939 Katsnelson together with David Ben-Gurion became a leader of the party's "active" wing, that proclaimed stepping up the struggle against the British mandate authorities. He became an initiator of the "Kol Israel" underground radio station creation and the issue of the illegal journal Eshnav. At the beginning of the Second World War Berl Kaznelson agitated for the mobilisation of the Palestine Jews to the British army, and he viewed that as a way of the Jewish armed forces training. At the end of the War Kaznelson joined those people who required the urgent creation of the Jewish state, notwithstanding even a possibility of the country's division. Today the kibbutz Beeri, the training and pedagogical Bet-Berl centre of the Malai party and the Oholo training centre are named after Berl Kaznelson. A native of the place of Mir in Korelichi region Zalman Shazar (Rubashov) (1889-1974) was one of the leaders of the Zionist and Jewish labour movement in Palestine and all over the world. He studied at the Universities of Germany and France. At the age of 22, Shazar first visited Palestine. After that he became an active propagandist of an independent Jewish state creation. Zalman Shazar was elected in the Zionist movement managing bodies, and after his move to Palestine in 1924 - in the Gistadrut managing board. He was one of the editors of the Davar newspaper, the member of the first Knesset. Zalman Shazar was the minister of education and culture, the member of the Jewish agency (Sokhnut) board, the chief of the department of education and culture of the World Zionist Organisation. He was a talented writer, journalist and historian. On May 21, 1963 Zalman Shazar was elected the third president of Israel and had this chair during 10 years. A native of the Belarusian town of Mogilev Rosa Kohen (1890-1937) was an active propagandist of the idea of a Jewish state creation in Palestine. Having arrived at the beginning of 1920s in Tel-Aviv, she became a member of this town labour council and she was a central figure in the Hagana headquarters for many years. Regrettably, Rosa Kokhen did not live till the day of joy - May 14, 1948. She did not see the results of her struggle. At the day of Kohen's death her son Izhak was only 15 years old. The years would pass, and the name of Izhak Rabin, Prime Minister of Israel, the laureate of Nobel peace prize, would become well-known all over the world. Belarusian Jews took an active part in all stages of the state of Israel creation, especially in 1940-1948. The organisation known as Hagana was one of the cornerstones, on which the independence of Israel was built. The word Hagana in Hebrew means defence. As a matter of fact, that is a translation of a Russian term self-defence, which appeared in the days of pogroms against Jews which spreaded around Russia at the end of 1905. Eliyahu Golomb (1893-1945) who was born in the town of Volkovysk was an organiser of the Jewish defence in mandated Palestine and one of the Hagana founders and leaders. When the youngster was 16 years old he arrived in Palestine where in four years he finished a higher school in Tel-Aviv. In 1918 Golomb was one of the organisers of the Jewish Legion, which was included in the British army. In 1936-1939 he became one of the initiators of the "field troops" creation, which fought against Arab terrorists. Eliyakhu Golomb thought that Hagana must be the only military force of the Jewish people. He was one of the creators of the special Hagana troops - Palmaha, he laid the basis of the armed forces of Israel and defined the direction of their development. Iehuda Slutski writes in his book "Hagana - Jewish military organisation in Erez-Israel": "After Eliyakhu Golomb's death in 1945 there was a constant feeling of this Hagana recognised leader's absence. Though he was never formally appointed as the highest Hagana commander, all the same his authority played a particular role in all spheres of its activities." In the house where E. Golomb lived in Tel-Aviv, it was created the Hagana museum named after him. The persons who made the most important contribution to the consolidation of the national security of Israel are nowadays awarded with the Eliyahu Golomb prize. The native land of the trade-union leader of Israel, ?garon Becker is the town of Kobrin though he was grown up in Brest-Litovsk, where he joined the Zionist youth labour movement. In 1925 when he was 19 years old, Becker arrived in Palestine, where he first worked as a builder. In four years he began working in the system of Gistadrut. In 1947 David Ben-Gurion appointed Agaron Becker the organiser of Hagana logistic division, and then - of the whole Army of Israel defence. In 1949 he returned to the work in Gistadrut and became the chief of the section of managing staff. During eight years (1961-1969) Agaron Becker was the Gistadrut Secretary General. He was repeatedly elected the member of the Knesset. The history of the state of Israel creation will always remember a name of the prominent lawyer, economist and diplomat, the native of the town of Gomel David Gakogen (1898-1985). David Gakogen studied at the Military academy in Istanbul, in the school of economics of London University. Officially he was one of the founders, a member of the board of directors and the manager of Solel Bone Ltd., but actually he carried out a secret mission of David Ben-Gurion on buying weapons for Hagana and the Defence Army of Israel. In 1949-1953 Gakogen was a member of the Knesset. Since 1950s he was an Israeli ambassador in Burma, a member of Israeli delegations on the UN General Assembly sessions, a member of the Committee on foreign affairs and security, the Israeli representative in the International Parliamentary Union, a member of the Council and the Political Committee of Mapai party. On the grounds of the national discipline observance the Hagana splitted in several organisations: Irgun Zvai Leummi (National military organisation - Ezel) and Lochamey kherut Israel (The Fighters for the liberty of Israel - Lekhi). During the last period of British ruling in Palestine these two organisations played an important role in the weakening of the mandate authorities regime. A native of the town of Smorgon, David Rasiel (Rosenson) (1910-1941) was the founder of Ezel. In 1937 he was one of the Ezel and its Jerusalem branch leaders and in 1938 he became its commander afters Zeev Zhabotinsky's offer. D. Rasiel took an active part in organising the illegal immigration. He pursued the policy of military operations in response to Arabs' terrorist actions. Once, in the morning on November 14, 1937, in several days after the murder of five Jews, D. Rasiel as the commander of Ezel organisation in Jerusalem, directed three groups in different ends of the city which were to fire upon Arab passers-by. Two Arabs were wounded and one more killed on Gaza street in Rehavia. Soon another four Arabs were killed too. In May, 1941 David Rasiel was killed during a diversion and reconnaissance operation in the region of Baghdad. Today Ramat-Rasiel moshav in the Judaic mountains is named after him. A younger David's sister Ester Rasiel-Noar (Rosemson) who was also born in Smorgon in 1911, participated in Ezel military operations too. In 1939 she became the first speaker of the Ezel underground radio station. In 1943 Ester Rasiel was a member of Ezel command. In 1944, after British police found a secret radio station in their house, her husband - one of the Ezel commanders, Y. Noar and she were arrested. E. Rasiel was released after the seven-months conclusion, but soon she was arrested again. After the state of Israel creation Mrs Ester Rasiel-Noar was a member of the Knesset during the quarter of a century. In 1942 a native of the town of Brest Menachem Begin, the former Beitar leader in Poland, who had been released from a Soviet concentration camp, arrived in Erez-Israel. He immediately became a commander of Beitar troops in Erez-Israel and at the end of 1943 he was unanimously elected the Ezel commander. Under Mr Begin's command the Ezel policy toward the British changed very much. When he had been in Poland, Begin was against his teacher Zeev Zhabotinsky's pro-British orientation. The anti-British moods in Ezel were intensifying. During several weeks a new headquarters were formed, and at the end of 1944 Ezel appealed to Palestinian Jews. There were such lines in that appeal: "We cancel the armistice between the Jewish administration and English authorities which give our brothers out to the Nazis. We declare a national war on these authorities, the war up to the victory end!.. Jews! To create a Jewish state is the only way to save our people, to ensure a worthy life for it. We will go this way because there is no another one. We will fight! Each Jew will fight for his motherland. The God of Israel will side His people. We will not surrender. Liberty or death!" ..................... Izhak Shamir (Ezernitsky) was a number one in this organisation. He emigrated from the western part of Belarus in 1935 when he was 20 years old. In July 1945 all three underground military organisations (Hagana, Ezel and Lekhi) created the united Resistance Actions Movement, which existed 9 months. In the same year there was published a joint Declaration of Ezel and Lekhi, one of the main initiators of which was Izhak Shamir. After the UN resolutions on the Palestine division in December, 1947, the members of Lekhi under Shamir's command took part in military actions against Arabic troops. In May 29, 1948 in a fortnight after the state of Israel creating, Lekhi became a part of the Defence Army of Israel. In 1980s Mr Izhak Shamir was twice appointed the prime minister of the state of Israel. A native of the town of Slonim Efraim Ben-Arzi (Kobrinsky) (he was born in 1910) became a well-known military figure of Israel. During the Second World War Ben-Arzi was on service in the British army, where he was demobilised in the rank of colonel from. In 1948-1950 the brigadier-general E. Ben-Arzi was the quartermaster of the Defence Army of Israel and greatly contributed to the reinforcement of the country's defence, to the victory in the war for independence. Chaim Laskov from the town of Borisov was an eminent Israeli warlord, one of the creators of the Defence Army of Israel. He joined Hagana when he was 20 years old, where soon he became the deputy commander of a special troop. In 1942-1943 as a member of the Palestinian regiment of the British army he participated in the military operations in Cyrenaic in Egypt. At the beginning of 1945 Laskov fought against Wehrmaht troops on the territory of Italy as the commander of the 2nd battalion of Jewish brigade. After the victory over Germany he was in Northern Italy, Belgium and Netherlands, where he was in charge of military ammunition purchasing and passing people over to Palestine. After returning to the motherland, Laskov was appointed the chief of the country's first military officers' college, he was a commander of the first tank battalion of the 7th brigade, soldiers of which showed courage and heroism in the war for independence. This battalion was particularly glorified in the battles for Latrun. Laskov took part in the battle for Nazareth and Galilee liberation already as a commander of a brigade. In 1949 he was commissioned a brigadier general and entrusted to lead a division of military training of the headquarters. In 1958-1961 Chaim Laskov was a chief of the headquarters. He died in 1982. Fiery fighter for a Jewish state creating was a native of the place Kopys in Gorets region of Mogilev province (now the village of Kopys in Orsha region) David Remez (Moshe-David Drabkin) (1886-1951). He was one of the founders of Mapai party, and in 1935-1945 he was a Gistadrut Secretary General. In 1929-1948 as a member of the executive committee of the World Zionist Organisation, David Remez was simultaneously an ideologist, theorist and practician in the sphere of a Jewish state creation on the Palestine territory. In 1948-1950 he was the minister of transport of Israel, and in 1950-1951 - the minister of education and culture. D. Remez was a member of the Knesset of the first and second convocations. A region of Haifa, Ramat-Remez, is named after him. Remez's son, Aharon, (was born in 1919) was the first commander of the Israeli Air Forces. The first minister of finance of Israel, and then the deputy prime minister of the country was a native of the town of Minsk Elieser Kaplan (1891-1952). He settled in Palestine in 1923 and assisted an occupying this territory by Jewish colonists. Since 1933 Kaplan was a board member of the Jewish agency, where he was a chief of the department of finance and administration. E. Kaplan significantly influenced the economic policy of the state of Israel in the late 40s - early 50s, when the country made its first steps, when the routs of its economic development were marked. The School of social and political sciences under the Jewish University in Jerusalem, the hospital in Rehovot and Haifa's Kiriyat-Eliezer quarter are named after him. ( The Even Shoshan brothers came from Minsk. Avraham Even Shoshan wrote the Hebrew dictionary) The first minister of agriculture of Israel ?garon Zisling (1901-1964) was born near Minsk. Since 1914 he lived in Palestine, worked in agriculture sector and in the construction industry. In a little while Zisling became one of the Hagana leaders. Then he became a founder of the Ahdut ga-Avoda party (1944) and ? pai party (1948). Since 1947 Zisling was a member of the Jewish agency delegation in UN, and in 1948-1949 he was a minister of agriculture. He was a member of Knesset of the first convocation, later - a member of the Zionist executive committee. A native of the town of Volkovysk Zerah Vargaftig as one of the World Jewish Congress leaders in many respects assisted in the Jewish state creation. In 1948 he became a member of the Provisional State Council of Israel. Z. Vargaftig several times was a Knesset member from the Ga-Poel ga-Mizrahi party (later on - the National-religious party), and in 1960-1973 he was the religion minister. A prominent Israeli politician Moshe Kol (Kolodny) was born in Pinsk in 1911. Since 1935 he was a member of the Gistadrut executive committee, in 1946-1966 a member of the World Zionist Organisation Executive Committee. In the memorable May, 1948 Moshe Kol as a member of the National government signed the Declaration of independence of Israel. In the same year he became one of the founders of the Progressive Party of Israel, from which he was a member of Knesset. In 1966-1969 he was a minister of tourism and development, and in 1969-1977 - a minister of tourism. Moshe Kol's life ended in 1989 in Jerusalem. A native of the place of Vishnevo (in Volozhin region now) Shimon Peres (Persky) made his contribution to the state of Israel creation. When he settled in Palestine in 1934, he was 11 years old. In 9 years Shimon Peres became a leader of the youth Zionist organisation Noar Haoved, and in 1946 he was elected a delegate to the 22nd Zionist congress in Basel. In 1948 Shimon Peres was appointed an assistant of the General Director of the Israeli Ministry of Defence headed by Levi Eshkol. He was in charge of the Navy, when he was only 25. In 1949-1951 Mr Peres became the head of Israeli defence representation in the United States. David Ben-Gurion "opened" Peres and sent him to the United States as the delegation head to buy weapons, which were so needed for the army of Israel then. During many years Mr Peres held leading positions in the country, twice he was the prime minister. In 1994 together with Izhak Rabin and Yasir Arafat he was awarded with a Nobel peace prize. ( Yehoshua Rabinovitz, mayor of Tel Aviv in the 1970 and treasury minister , was also born in Vishnevo c1905) The name of Kadish Luz (Lozinsky) will always stay in the history of the state of Israel. He was born in the town of Bobruisk in 1895. In 1917 Kadish Lozinsky became one of the creators of the All-Russian Union of Jews-Warriors, he took an active part in the Gehaluz movement's activities. In 3 years he arrived in Erez-Israel and worked on inning and roads building. Since 1935 ?. Luz had been a member of the Central Committee of Mapai party and Gistadrut executive committee. During those years he did a lot to create a Jewish state in Palestine and to strengthen its economy. Luz has presented Mapai party in Knesset for 12 years. In 1955-1959 he was a minister of agriculture, then during ten years he was a Knesset speaker. ?. Luz was highly respected among all the Knesset factions and promoted the prestige of Israeli parliament. His authority was confirmed by granting him an honourable Doctor of Philosophy degree in Jewish University in Jerusalem. ? dish Luz died in 1972. In Israel it is well-known the name of Kadish's younger brother - a public figure Shabtai Lozinsky, a native of the town of Bobruisk too (1896-1947). Gistadrut's Even-Vassid and Mashbir companies played a considerable role in the economic development of Erez-Israel. Shabtai Lozinsky was one of the directors of the first one and headed the second. After the defeat of German fascism he got a Sokhnut's task - to organise in Italy the camps for Jews-refugees. S. Lozinsky did not live till May 14, 1948, he tragically died in a road accident. In 1948 Joseph Tkoa (Tukochinsky) became an adviser of the Israeli delegation in the UN. Since 1949 he had been one of the most well-known diplomats in the state of Israel for more than 25 years. As the head of Israeli delegations, 'k® participated in peace talks with Syria. Lebanon, Jordan and Egypt delegations in 1948-1958. In 1967-1975 he was a permanent Israeli representative to the UN. At the beginning of 1960s 'k® was an Israeli ambassador in Brasilia, and in 1962-1965 - in the Soviet Union. This eminent diplomat was born in the town of Lyakhovichi. In mid-30s together with the family he emigrated to China. In Shanghai Mr 'k® finished law school in French University, then got education in the field of international law in the United States, in Harvard university. In 1949 he was repatriated in Israel from the United States. After his retirement from the civil service, Joseph 'k® in 1975-1981 was a president and then an honourable president of Ben-Gurion University in Beere-Sheve. --------- Many people know that a prominent Israeli politician Golda Meir (? bovich) was born in Kiev in 1898. But only few know that most of her childhood (nearly seven years) she spent in Belarusian city of Pinsk, where her grandfather and grandmother lived. Exactly from Pinsk Golda's family emigrated in the USA in 1906.........For the rest go to http://www.open.by/belarus-now/cont/1998/0512/politics/4.html
http://www.open.by/belarus-now/cont/1998/0512/politics/4.html
- Monday, November 28, 2005 at 12:11:55 (EST)
I am doing a research project for the authorities of the city of munich concerning the history of the famous Villa Waldberta in Feldafing at the Lake Starnberg near Munich. Today the building is owned by the city of Munich and used as a residence for art scholarship holders. From 1945-1952 the villa was occupied by the US-Army for the purposes of the jewish Displaced-Persons-Camp in Feldafing. The Archive of the Zentrum für Antisemitsimusforschung in Berlin keeps copies of the "Leo-Schwarz-Papers" and "DP-Germany"-papers in which I found several lists with the names of inhabitants of the Villa Waldberta. The inhabitants mainly came from Eastern Europe and Germany. The city of Munich and I are very interested in finding persons who may be still alive and have lived in the Villa during the described period or maybe any descendants of persons that have lived in the building and have died in the meantime. Maybe you know some of the names? I have listed the names, the place of birth and the date of birth below. Sometimes it is very difficult to read the original text so I have marked it with a "?". It is then mainly meant as "Sounds like". "geb" means "born". Here are the names: Awend, Berend; geb. Auschwitz, 18.2.1918 Awend, Dina; geb. Skarzysko, 1.12.1920 Awend, Salomon; geb. Feldafing, 10.7.1947 Aport, Fischel; geb. Skarzysko, 10.9.1902 Ajzenbut (?), Haskiel; geb. Pinsk, 27.9.1887 Ajzenbut, Mirka; geb. Pinsk, 20.11.1893 Ajzenbut, Mowsza; geb. Pinsk, 24.6.1929 Ajzenbut, Estera; geb. Pinsk, 20.10.1927 Balaban, Szyfra; geb. Radzwikour (?), 2.1.1905 Baukowicz/Bajkowicz, Ilja/Elia; geb. Tylzyk (?), 3.5.1902 Baukowicz/Bajkowicz, Fruma; geb. Tylzyk (?), 24.12.1908 Baukowicz/Bajkowicz, Harry, geb. Tylzyk (?), 4.10.1936 Baukowicz/Bajkowicz, Jakob, geb. Tylzyk (?), 1.11.1938 Drzewo, Jakob, geb. Zawiereu (?), 11.11.1921 Drzewo, Jadzier (?), geb. Olkusz, 15.2.1929 (?) Ellert, Hermann, geb. Nousztadt (Neustadt?), 21.10.1911 Ellert, Erna; geb. Auschwitz, 12.9.1920 Ellert, Heni; geb. Nousztadt (Neustadt?), 12.9.1922 Fischer, Febe (?); Auschwitz, 25.6.1925 Flurman, Luzer; Warschau, 7.11.1921 Flurman, Felen (?); Warschau, 22.5.1923 Flurman, Bruchen (?); Feldafing, 24.10.1946 Finkielsztayn, Abram; geb. Przysucha, 10.3.1918 Finkielsztayn, Sabina; geb. Przysucha, 4.11.1924 Grun (?), Izdor; geb. Milowka, 23.9.1911 Grun (?), Morja; geb. Sosnowiec, 1.5.1920 Grun (?), Bert; geb. München, 29.12.1946 Gordon, Jakob; geb. Kurpi (?), 10.1.1896 Gordon, Rachela; geb. Kowno, 6.8.1912 Gordon, Moses; geb. Memel, 8.4.1926 Gordon, Jakob (no further information) Galperin, Haskiel; geb. Szeiwle (?), 20.7.1921 Galperin, Sara; geb. Szeiwle (?), 15.3.1898 Kutner, Pejsach/Pesach; geb. Ozorkow, 23.2.1901 Kutner, Marja; geb. Ozorkow, 12.05.1906 Kutner, Leib; geb. ?, 12.12.1924 Kutner, Peppi; geb. Pojend.Rin (?), 28.1.1926 Kiperman(n), Hersch/Hersz; geb. Radziwillow, 2.1.1902 Kiperman(n), Hana; geb. Radziwillow, 3.6.1905 Kiperman(n), Ita; geb. Radziwillow, 4.5.1931 Kielczyglowksi, Berek; geb. Ozsstochowe (?), 18.3.1918 Kielczyglowksi, ?, geb. Radomsk, 1.9.1924 Kielczyglowksi, Aydyl; geb. Feldafing, 29.3.1947 Kirsz, Oszer, Lodz, 1.5.1909 Kirsz, Rosze (?), ?, 5.5.1917 Kirsz, Abram; Feldafing, 29.3.1947 Kaweblum, Helen; geb. Lodz, 6.10.1917 Lechler, Eugennie (?); geb. Tarnow, 24.6.1921 Lechler, Gustav; geb. München, 1.8.1947 Lewkowicz, ?; geb. Olkusz, 1.8.1921 Lewkowicz, Abram; geb. Sosnowiec, 15.5.1921 Lipszyc, Zendel; geb. Kowno, 15.2.1906 Lipszyc, Rachela; geb. Kowno, 15.4.1910 Lipzyc, Mayer/Wolf.; geb. Feldafing, 29.1.1946 Mielich, Hersch; geb. Czestochowa, 13.6.1921 Mielich, Blume, geb. Plock; 18.6.1922 Mielich, Abram; geb. Feldafing, 29.1.1946 Najber(..), Izrael; geb. Pinczew, 28.3.1905 Najber(...), (?), geb. Plock, 18.6.1922 Najber(...), Cywja (?); Feldafing, 20.3.1947 Perelmuter, Haim; geb. Szczercow, 3.6.1909 Reysztayn, Elgasz; geb. Krakau, 22.2.1922 Reysztayn, Frieda; geb. Auschwitz, 25.6.1923 Rozencwayg, Fanach; geb. Lodz, 10.11.1913 Rozencwayg, Bela; geb. Litomirsk, 8.7.1920 Rozencwayg, Laje (?); geb. Feldafing, 19.10.1946 Skora, Samuel; geb. Sosnowitz, 16.4.1919 Skora, Stella; geb. Zywiec, 10.8.1923 Taube, Szlamek; geb. Tobieszki (?), 8.12.1913 Transport, Bronia; geb. Plock, 3.3.1923 Transport Mania; geb. Plock, 5.5.1916 Wolman, Majer; geb. Warschau, 22.9.1920 Wolman, Rozia (?); geb. Warschau, 5.12.1925 Wolman, Pessa (?); geb. Feldafing, 26.8.1946 Zyndorf, Icek (?); geb. Sosnowitz, 10.2.1913 Zyndorf, Dora; geb. Sosnowitz, 20.7.1926 Zyndorf, Benjamin; geb. Wolbrom (?), 10.4.1918 Zyndorf, Genu (?); geb. Dzialoszyn, 14.8.1926 Zwirn, David; geb.Korczs(...), 15.3.1924 Zwirn, Genie(...); geb. Bidzin (?), 7.3.1927 Further Names: Sowinska (no further information) Lehrer, Eugenia; Tarnow, 24.6.192? Lehrer, Leon; Stryi, 14.9.1918 Thanks for your help! ------------
Tobias Mahl <Tobias.Mahl@web.de>
Munich, Gerrmany - Sunday, November 27, 2005 at 13:24:50 (EST)
Andrew Adler (drdrew@andrewadler.com) Message: Has anyone come across the family name of Dorushkin...?
Andrew Adler
- Friday, November 25, 2005 at 21:22:42 (EST)
Jenni (Genia?) DAWIDOW, b: Feb.1885 in Minsk, to her parents Jacob-Aharon and Ita-Sara. The family migrated at the last decade of the 19th cent. to Breslau. She returned to Minsk after a few years and married to Simon FUCHS, probably a far cousin of her. She disconnected any contact with her siblings who made Alia to Palestina-Israel. If anyone knows about her or about the FUCHS family, please let me know. Thank you, Uriel NISSEL, Jerusalem
from the jewishgen sig
- Friday, November 25, 2005 at 21:17:15 (EST)
From the L>itvaksig;...not naming a child for a living relative, rather naming only for dead relatives, agrees with what I was told by my Litvak Bubbie, among countless other superstitions she brought with her when she emigrated. As a child, I never really took these admonishments seriously, but there was always a thread of doubt, given her obvious seriousness, and so I willingly chewed on a piece of thread when my Bubbie or my mom sewed a button on my shirt while I was wearing it (so the angel of death would see, by the movement of my jaw, that I was still living and not "take me.") According to either law or superstition, the only time a garment was to be sewn upon while being worn was a shroud on a corpse. Another had to do with which foot you stepped into a home on a visit, another was to never sleep with your feet pointed toward the door, lest you appear to be dead and ready to be taken away. She feigned spitting three times to ward off the "ayin hara" (kein ayin hara means without the evil eye), warned against selecting a name for an unborn child and to never give a present for an unborn child, lest you take the gift of life as a given, and not as the will of G-d. She turned over a glass to pour out the evil spirits if she heard someone was talking about her. If you saw a funeral procession, you were to hold a button on your clothes and walk a few steps along with the procession, I'm guessing to show respect for the deceased and the holding of the button in some way repelled the angel of death. Another was to never place a hat on a bed or close the lid over piano keys, both of which symbolized a time of death or a shiva house. Further, breaking a glass at Jewish weddings is meant to scare away evil spirits, in addition to signifying that all of marriage is not as joyous as the wedding itself. It is believed that in a double wedding, only one couple will have a good marriage, hence a proscription against double marriages. I'm certain there are books of these superstitions and would make very interesting reading. Gabe
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- Tuesday, November 22, 2005 at 19:15:05 (EST)
I start looking for people from Ivenitz, but I saw that you found a site about Ivenitz that was written by someone who did a good work as well. I'll be happy to gather information from people in Israel, or do anything you have in mind. BTW, did you ever think about "DOR HA'HEMSHECH" ? I think I wrote about it once & I'd like to do something. I also think that it is important to do everything to remember due to all the Holocaust denials. Am sure you have ideas. Will be glad to hear & cooperate. 1) When you look in the Yizkor book for Ivanitz, you can read 2 chapters that were written by my father Avraham Baranovitch : on page 217 the chapter is called "Ivenitz" & on page 318 it was called "the battle for life" (it is now my translation ...), he wrote it in Yiddish. The book is at my mother's house & I'll take it this week. My father studied in the famous "MIR" Yeshiva & also in another Yeshiva, the name of which will let you know. My father's first wife was Sonia Shwarzberg. I called this evening the former brother-in-law of my father - Sonia's brother, Leible, who is today called Aryeh & lives in Kiryat Bialik & he told me that Sonia was born in Ivenitz in 1914 to her mother Dvashe & Shlomo. Dvashe was also born in Ivenitz & Shlomo in Ivie. Leible also told me that my father & Sonia had 2 kids : Jenia, who was born in 1935/6 & Yehuda who was born in the Ghetto of Dvoretz in 1942. Sonia & the 2 kids perished a year after being in that Ghetto, when the Nazis & their local assistants killed all the Ghetto residents & burned the Ghetto. Leible was 14/15 years old when the war started & he ran away to Russia. I am today so sorry I didn't do this work long time ago. I just know some stories about my father & asked my mother to write them down, i.e. whatever she knows. I remember that my mother told me that my father was sent to work by the Germans. All of a sudden, while working in the woods, they all saw a huge fire - the Germans had put all the children in one large hole, sitting one on the other one, then poured kerosene on them & burned them all. I imagine that since then it was very difficult to get any details from my father because he was very sensitive, but now we are trying to ask questions & get information. 2) Leible told me that he has a picture of his sister Sonia & her father Shlomo. We will talk tomorrow again. He is now 83 years old. His wife Dora passed away 5 years ago. He lives far, as you know, but I'll do my best to help him on any arrangements he needs. 3) Leible also asked me to check about information in the Yad Vashem site, so we'll check it tomorrow together, since he has no one to do it for him. I'll get any info available also about his father's family from Ivie & let you know, since I saw that you started a site for Ivie as well. 4) Where should I put information about my father ? I'd like to put it in Horodok, as well as in Ivenitz. What is your opinion ? Best, Sarah, Israel
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- Saturday, November 12, 2005 at 18:00:53 (EST)
yehuda fine (featherrivers@yahoo.com) (Home Page: http://yehudafine.com) My grandmother of blessed memory left Glebokie after the pogroms in 1882. Her name was Esther Freeman and eventually settled in Toronto and married my grandfather of blessed memory Shlomo Mendel Fine. I was told by her many times about the progroms but she never spoke to me about the fate of the rest of our family there. It is only now that I am seeking some links back to Glebokie. Her name came back to me years ago via the Disapora Museum in Israel which at that time kept some records. They had her name and the shtetl but little else. Very few of my family ever came to America. Just a few cousins. Esther founded Canadian Hadassah and was the last living member to die. She lived well into her 90's. She also was considered almost as if she was a malach during the flu epidemic at the turn of the 20th Century. It is my hope someone might have some memory of my family. I hold little hope but maybe one of you has a memory or thread of her life back then. Cousins, anyone. Yes i know this is just part of an abundance of such emails. But if somehow this is read by someone and can respond I would be ever so grateful. yehudah fine
yehuda fine <featherrivers@yahoo.com>
- Thursday, November 10, 2005 at 02:54:26 (EST)
A note from the Litvaksig; .... VILIJAMPOLE/SLABODKA, a suburb of Kaunas/Kovno, was an important seat of learning.  Yeshiva Knesses Yisroel, "The Slabodka Yeshiva" was located here and in its time was one of the largest yeshivas in the world.  Slabodka was also turned into the "Kovno Ghetto" by the Nazis. LitvakSIG has acquired the following vital records for our shtetl: Birth:  1854 -1895----- Marriage:  1878-1914---- Death:  1863-1877------- Divorce:  1862-1914-------------- You can learn a lot by helping to get these records indexed through LitvakSIG's Vital Records Indexing Project. You can use the online form by clicking on www.jewishgen.org/litvak   scroll down and click on "To Become a Contributor" and follow the instructions.  Be sure to nominate the shtetl "Vilijampole" in the vital records section.
www.jewishgen.org/litvak
- Thursday, November 10, 2005 at 02:47:35 (EST)
Yaakov Eidelman story ( see pictures of Yaakov and his brother Feive as partisans in the main page for Horodok).... Today I spoke with Yaakov Eidelman of 20/41 Moshe Sharet Street, Kiryat yam, Israel . Yaakov was born in Horodok in 1924. He is the youngest son of Gdalyahu (son of Yaakov and Chaia Eidelman) and Zelda ( Daughter of Ben Zion and Rachel Malishkevitz ). His siblings; Feiva Eidlman was born in 1911. Rachel Eidelman was born in 1913. She was married to Tzvi Shapira and had a daughter; Rivale, born a few years before the war. Chaia Eidelman was born in 1917. Hesel Eidelman was born in 1919. Hesel was the pride of the family. He was smart and a good student. He was also strong and good-looking. He studied in the Mir Yeshiva and was a very devout Jew. The Eidelman family was a large family in Horodok. A sister of Gdalyahu as well as two brothers, left Horodok c 1911 and settled in America. Recently, Yaakov found a daughter of one of the brothers; Ida Shapiro of Tennessee. There was also a brother; Israel who lived with his family in Horodok. A sister of Gdalyahu married a brother of his wife; Chaim Leib Malskevitz. They lived in Horodok. Another sister; Rivka, married Burl Leibovitz and had; Chaim and Mula ( born c 1912) and then Feive, Gdalya and Chaia. Gdalyahu was a dealer of horses and livestock. There were about 350 Jewish families in Horodok. Yaakov felt good growing up in Horodok. The Jews were in control of the shtetl. The non Jews seemed a bit fearful of them and did not start fights. The Jewish kids went to Tarbut school, were most subjects were instructed in Hebrew. The teachers he remembers are Izkovitz, Segal, Avraham and the Rabbi. In the movie that was made by the Shapiro family who came from America ( c 1932) you could see Yaakov and his friend from the Tarbut school wearing the blue uniform shirts and the hats with the seven corners. He also recognized his first cousin, Feive Leibuvitz who perished ( from the entire leibovitz family only the father survived in Sibiria).Yaakov graduated after seven grades and started studying in a Yeshiva shortly before the war started. In September of 1939 Germany attacked Poland. In a short time the polish army was defeated. There was a period of great fear and confusion. When the Jews of Horodok heard that the Soviets are taking over the north east regions of Poland- many sighed with relief. They knew that they will suffer economically but they felt that physically they were safe. Yaakovs brother who was with the Mir Yeshiva- moved to Independent Lithuania ( Shavli) in Lithuania the Yeshiva could continue the studies. Eventually the Yeshiva transferred to China on the way to the U.S.. Hesel was not with the rest of the Yeshiva students. Together with Kur he returned to Horodok, not wanting to live in China were he felt that he could not find Kosher food. Only Yisrael Shparber of both Horodok and Mir came to China and from there to the U.S. As the Soviets arrived they closed the Tarbut school and people who owned private stores ( most of the Jews) had to form cooperatives or find other jobs. Yaakov attended night classes to learn Russian. Some Jews were sent to Siberia. Amongst them were Leibovitz adult males. His uncle; Berl Leibovitz and his two oldest sons; Chaim and Mula. On Sunday, June 22nd. 1941 Germany attacked Russia. No one in his worst nightmare could conceive that in a few days- on Wednesday the 25th of June the Germans would already be in Horodok. His uncles family ( Chaim Leib Malishkevitz) left Horodok on horse and buggy only to find that it was too late. The Germans were already farther east, in Minsk, and they had to return. Shortly after they arrived the Germans collected all the Jews of Horodok. They had them stand in the center of town for many hours without food and drinks. After many hours they were told that they lost all rights of being human. They are not to walk on the sidewalks, they are not to talk to non-Jews, they are not to leave town or walk in-groups of more then 3 . They are not to use any transportation. They are not to be outdoors at nights, and so on- anyone who is found to be doing so would be immediately killed. From now on they will have to wear Yellow stars on the front and back and be slaves to the Germans and their collaborators. From this day the Jews felt like animals who are hunted. Yakkov felt under great depression and slept continuously for many days. Eventually he had to go to work for the Germans (as the rest of the Jewish men). Since Horodok had no industry, the Jews were sent to fix roads in the region. Since the Jews knew clearly that the day of the liquidation of the community will come soon they started arranging hiding places and made deals with some non Jewish neighbors. They gave them large sums of money and possessions. In return the non Jews promised to help them after they escaped. In the summer of 1942 Yaakov was taken with a group of about 17 young men from Horodok to the Krasne camp. The Krasne camp was a forced labor camp near Horodok. A few weeks after Yakkov left the Horodok ghetto was liquidated. Most families ran to their hiding places but most hiding places were discovered and the people were killed. The aunts family was discovered hiding in the Eidelman barn, when they refused to come out grenades were thrown and they were all killed. Yaakovs parents and brothers were hiding in the basement- their place was not discovered and after a few days they were able to escape and hid in the Krasne camp. Yisrael Maeizel gave large sums of money to a non Jewish neighbor but when he escaped and came to his house the man killed him ( Yisrael Meizels brother lives in the U.S) .Yaakov knew that the days of the Krasne camp were also numbered. He heard that the resistance force arrived to the area and established partisan camps in the area. He very badly wanted to join the fight. Twice he escaped from the Krasne camp. The first time he was able to get in touch with the Soviet partisans but they would not take him without weapon. The second time he escaped with Mirim Draboskin ( later of Ashkelom , Israel). A farmer Mirim knew gave them weapons in exchange for large sums of money. Yaakov joined the Soviestko Belarus and took part in many important missions. He became known for his bravery. Shortly before the Krasne camp was liquidated Yaakov brother Feive, his sister; Chaia and two other people ( Hesel refused to go with them, wanting to keep Kosher) ( Eizar Rabinovitz? Later joined the partisans and was killed fighting the Germans) escaped from the Krasne camp. While the sister was waiting Feive went to obtain weapon and find a unit of partisans to join. Since there were many in the Krasne camp who were sick with typhus when the partisans met with Feive they had an order to kill him so illnesses would not be spread. They told him to split and never show his face in this area. The sister meanwhile returned to the camp. It was 3 days before Purim of 1943. The next day the camp was liquidated and all but Yaakov and Feive perished. Feive joined the Zakalov Otriad to fight the Germans. In the summer of 1944 Belarus was liberated. Yaakov took pert in the march of the Partisans in Minsk. Feive immediately joined the Red Army to fight the Germans in the west. Yaakov and other elite soldiers from the partisans were chosen for a special unit to clear the forests of Belarus. Now the Germans and their collaborators replaced the partisans and Jews and they were in hiding. Sometimes later Yaakov lived in Volozhin with other surviving Jews from the area. He received a letter that his brother was wounded. Yaakov became greatly disturbed, he lost the will to survive. He joined the red Army and was sent to learn driving tanks and other machines. In 1945 he took part in the victory parade in Moscow and drove his tank right by Stalin who greeted him. Shortly after he had a visitor; it was his cousin, Feive Eidelman ( there were 3 Feive Eidelmans in Horodok)- Feive lives in the U.S this days. Later Yaakov found out this his brother; Feive also survived and he now lives in Volozhin. Yaakov was still in the Red Army in the area of Moscow. He was in the airforce in a transportation unit. In 1947 He received two weeks leave and visited his brother in Volozin. In `1948 he was done with his service. He moved with his brother to Minsk. Here they were able to make a good living. Feive married Rachel nee Alterman of Horodok and had two sons ( his son Natan lives in Rishon Lezion) . Yaakov married Raia Kanter of Minsk ( she was in the Soviet Union during the war) They had a daughter in Minsk. More then 100 people survived from Horodok. Most of them left the Soviet Union for Israel via Poland. since they were former Polish citizens most were permitted to go to Poland ( unless they knew secretes of the Soviets) . Yakkov and his family were able to bring their possessions to Poland. They came with a car and a motorcycle. When they arrived in Poland they sold their possessions and took a plane to Israel. They were placed in a immigrant community in Tiveon. Feive came with his family by boat. They wanted to place the family in Beer Sheva. Yaakov arranged for Feive to live near him in Tiveon. Yaakov did well in Israel. After a short time he was able to buy a route of delivery for Tnuva co-operative specializing in Dairy products. Yaakov is involved with others who survived from the area. With Ytzhak Regev of Acco ( nee Rogovin) who was also an heroic partisan, they submitted to Yad vashem a list of all the families of Horodok who had no survivors to submit such reports. . Reports by Yaakov to Yad vashem in 1994; His father; Gdaljau Ejdelman was born in Horodok, in 1885 to Yaakov and Khaia. He was married to Zelda nee Malashkevitz... His mother; Zelda Eidelman nee Malashkevitz was born in Horodok, Poland in 1888 to Bentzion and Rakhel his brother and sisters; Hesel Eidelman was born in Horodok, Poland in 1919 to Gdaliau and Zelda -Rakhel Ejdelman was born in Horodok, Poland in 1913 to Gdaliau and Zelda . She was married to Tzvi Shapira.-Khaia Ejdelman was born in Horodok, Poland in 1917 to Gdaliau and Zelda his fathers' sister; Rivka Libovich nee Ejdelman was born in Horodok, Poland in 1879 to Yaakov and Khaia. She was married to Berl his cousin; Feiva Libovitz was born in Horodok, Poland in 1907 to Rivka nee Eidelman. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok Gdaliahu Libovitz was born in Horodok, Poland in 1910 to Rivka Eidelman. He was single Khaia Perevozkin nee Libovitz was born in Horodok, Poland in 1909 to Rivka nee Eidelman. She was married to Mirim his fathers' brother; Israel Ejdelman was born in Horodok, Poland in 1883 to Yaakov and Khaia. He was married. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Israel died in 1943 in Krasne, Poland at the age of 60. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1994 by his nephew. The wife of his fathers' brother; Shula Ejdelman nee Malashkevitz was born in Horodok, Poland in 1885. She was married to Israel His cousins; Yaakov Ejdelman was born in Horodok, Poland in 1923 to Israel and Zelda. He was single. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Yaakov died in 1941 in Horodok, Poland at the age of 18. David Ejdelman was born in Horodok, Poland in 1928 to Israel and Shula. He was a child. Faive Ejdelman was born in Horodok, Poland in 1917 to Israel and Shula. He was single. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Army, Ussr. Faive died in the Shoah Simon Ejdelman was born in Horodok, Poland in 1913 to Israel and Shula. He was single. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland....
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- Tuesday, November 08, 2005 at 18:18:41 (EST)
Bernice Weinstein Upin (b3upin@webtv.net) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Message: Looking for anyone who has information about the Joseph and Leah Upin family from Seda, Lithuania. In 1920 Leah Upin came to the United States wih 6 children, Marion, Jennie, Sarah, Saul, Orrin and Samuel. Charles and Otto preceded their mother to the United States.Joseph was deceased. We are looking for any known relatives of this family. We know of no siblings nor their decendants of either Joseph or Leah. All of that generation are now deceased but our children are interested in knowing extended family. Does this sound familiar to anyone?
Bernice Weinstein Upin <b3upin@webtv.net>
USA - Tuesday, November 08, 2005 at 10:25:48 (EST)
david s davis (ddav324@optonline.net) Message: I am named for David Saul Sklut, my grandfather, who emigrated from vilna gubernia, probably in the 1880's. He lived and died (1924)in NY,NY. Married to Jennie Zaretsky, my father Isidore plus 4 others. Not one of my cousins have a clue about David's history. Much obliged to make contact with any current (or former)Skluts. Additionally, research help would be quite welcome. Thanks kindly, DSD
david s davis (ddav324@optonline.net)
USA - Monday, November 07, 2005 at 20:57:52 (EST)
I am pleased to announce that the 1806, 1850, and 1858 Revision Lists for Derechin are in the process of being translated into English and placed into an Excel spreadsheet for eventual uploading to the Belarus Country Database. A few people responded to my previous message asking who had spoken to me at the IAJGS Conference about getting Derechin records. That person is Kevin Hanit in Canada. Kevin will be the person to contact regarding fundraising to pay for this project. He can be reached at . The name of the game is patience and persistence. Dave
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- Monday, November 07, 2005 at 20:43:35 (EST)
I received an email from someone who does not want to be named; "...Based on information I got from you some time ago, last weekend I wrote to Yaakov Edelman in Israel. Yaakov's great grandfather was my great great grandfather.....( from Horodok) ....I received a call from Isaac Noll who called me at Yaakov's request. Isaac and Yaakov were partisans together, both from Horodok. In reviewing your various websites, I found a number of references to Isaac. I thought you might want to phone him....." I phoned Isaac Noll in New York. Here is what Isaac said; I was born in Horodok in 1921. My mother; Minya nee Botvinik, was born in Rakov ( most members of the Botvinick family came from Rakov). My father; Leizer Noll son of Avraham Hillel Noll, was born in Horodok in 1899. He was a dealer in Flax and made a good living. we owned a nice home, surrounded by gardens. I was born immediately after the area of Horodok became part of Poland. The years before my birth, were difficult years for residents of the Vilna region. The eastern front during World war I split the region and for some years kept changing between Russian and German control. Later the Soviets took control and after a war with Poland the border with the Soviet Union passed very near Horodok. The years of war were devastating for the local residents. They suffered poverty, hunger and disease. My fathers two older brothers and one older sister were able to get Visas to immigrate to the U.S. One brother settled in San Francisco , the other in Connecticut. The sister lived in New York and had two daughters. My father and his youngest sister ( Chazka) were not able to get visas' or collect money for travel. They both decided to make their lives in Horodok. Chazka married Gedalia Altshuler and they had two children; Shifra and Avraham Hillel. My brother; Avraham Hillel, was born in 1922. My sisters; Yitka in 1925 and Mary in 1927. I studied at the Tarbut school . I learned all subjects ( other then Polish studies) in Hebrew. I was a member of Hashomer hatzair Youth movement and dreamed of one day living in Eretz Yisrael. In September of 1939 the Soviets annexed our area. To be a member of a Zionist youth movement was not permitted any more. There were other restrictions of owning private businesses. In June of 1941the Germans invaded the Soviet Union. The area was soon taken over by Germany. Near Hordok, in the town of Krasne, the German established a work camp and took all the Jews of Horodok who could work- as slave laborers. in the summer of 1942 they killed all the young children and old people of Horodok. My family members, as well as the familiy of my fathers' sister, worked for the Germans in Krasne. I worked near the forest together with a few other young men from Horodok. We decided to escape. One by one we split to the forest. Shepsel Shpringer and Zelig Lushitzer were with me as well as two other guys who I forget their names. We reached the forest safely ( it was the end of summer of 1942). We had to find food during the many days we lived on our own in the forest. We would carry long sticks on our backs and late at night go to the farmers and demand food. Some time later Soviet soldiers who became P.O.W.s were able to escape from the Germans . We got together and established a partisan Otriad by the name Sovietika Narodny. The leader was Eilosha. We took parts in many missions against the enemy. I also made sure to help other Jews escape and help in the fight. Amongst other I helped my brother and father escape and become fighters ( not in my unit). I was not able to help my mother, sisters and family of my aunt. They were all killed when the Krasne camp was liquidated in the Spring of 1943. When the war ended we moved to Minsk. I studied plumbing and had a good job. I married a girl from Rakov. tragically my brother died of a heat attack in 1948. In 1957 we moved to Poland ( as former Polish citizens) From there we were able to come to Israel in 1960 with our four months old daughter. We settled in Ashdod with my father. My fathers sister sent us Visa to come to the U.S and we settled in the New York area with our daughter , son and my father. regretfully I have no pictures of my mother or sisters.
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- Sunday, November 06, 2005 at 13:27:19 (EST)
My fathers' first cousin wrote; ....I would like you to look into my DNA Profile - The Y chromosone of which, is identical (over the millenias) to my grandfather Yehuda, my father Arie (Lova), my sons Ira (Ahron-Doron) & Alan - and my grandson Spencer. It appears that we belong to Haplogroup G (M201) which began with M-61 lineage ("Eurasian Adam"). The Report says, that: "The  M-201 lineage that defines an uncommon haplogroup called G, which is rarely present in population frequencies at greater  than a few percent.  Genealogists  believe that this line of descent first appeared in northern India's Indus Valley, on the M-89 lineage, and subsequently  dispersed during the past 10,000 to 20,000 years. Currently, little else is known of haplogroup G's origin or history.  Learning more about such unusual lineages is a primary goal of the Genographic Project" Only about 1-2% of modern-day people of European ancestry are in Haplogroup G, with a gradient from southeast (most common) to northwest (least common).  In Europe, the Haplogroup G, along with Haplogroups J and E3b, are considered markers for the spread of farmers from the Middle East into Europe 6000-8000 years ago.  Worldwide, the haplogroup is most common in the Caucusus region, especially the Republic of Georgia where the prevalence approaches 30%.  It is fairly common in Turkey (10%)
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- Tuesday, October 25, 2005 at 23:49:53 (EDT)
My mother's Father, Joe Benjamin came from Skoudas (Jossel Benyaminovitz). I came across your site while looking for links to his mother's (Miriam) family, the Shmuklers, who I assume came from the Kovno Guberniya. I don'e know how this would fit in, but I noticed that you have some pictures of Skuodas on the Levitan page. Please get back to me. Verne Weisberg, MD
http://www.drverne.com/ <alandry2@maine.rr.com>
- Monday, October 24, 2005 at 23:04:03 (EDT)
when my wife and I spent several days in Krakow in 2001, including Yom Kippur, worshiping at the Rema synagogue (named after my wife's ancestor), there was a Rabbi, young, with a wife and children, living in Krakow--we enjoyed shabbes hospitality at his apartment near the shul. He was of Italian/Croatian (Jewish of course) background, and he had just completed a new translation of the Chumash into Polish, consulting with Czeslaw Milosz, who was then living in Krakow, on the Polish stylistics. My guess is that Rabbi Flaks is the first rabbi in Krakow funded by the orthodox group in Jerusalem that released this story. I believe that the rabbi we met (definitely orthodox) was being funded at least in part by the Lauder foundation, which is active in Krakow.
Jules Levin
USA - Friday, October 21, 2005 at 10:41:25 (EDT)
Krakow Gets First Rabbi Since Holocaust ---------------------------------------------- By Associated Press - October 17, 2005,----------------------- WARSAW, Poland -- The first rabbi to serve Krakow full-time since the Holocaust took up his post Monday, a mission that includes guiding a revival of Jewish life and helping people rediscover their Jewish heritage forgotten during the decades of communism. Rabbi Avraham Flaks, a 38-year-old Russian-born Israeli, has been getting to know members of Krakow's small Jewish community over the past few weeks, but officially took up his duties with an evening prayer service marking the start of the weeklong festival of Sukkot. Michael Freund, chairman of the Shavei Israel organization sponsoring Flaks' work, said he hopes the new rabbi will be able to "keep the flame of Judaism alive" in a city whose rich, centuries-old Jewish community was nearly wiped out during the Holocaust. There are about 200 people registered with the community, but an estimated 1,000 Jews are believed to live in Krakow -- most of them people who only recently discovered their Jewish roots following the fall of communism in 1989, Freund told The Associated Press. There are "quite a number of people who have gone through these experiences, suddenly learning that they were born Jews," Freund said. "Many don't know what to do with that information, what to make of it, what role it should play in their lives." During the communist era, some Jews hid their religious identities, even from their children, to avoid discrimination. Many fled the country in 1968, following a government-sponsored anti-Semitic campaign.
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- Thursday, October 20, 2005 at 13:49:42 (EDT) It's fantastic p
Today I called Moti, the son of David Matosov and Dora nee Ziskind ( both originally from Kurenets) David Matosov was born in 1905 and you could read a little about his early childhood (which took place in the deepest of the forest amongst bears) in the Kurenets Yizkor book, David was the son of Leib and Sara. Leib owned a turpentine factory in the forest near kurenets. David was the only son but he had sisters . Some lived with their families in Kurenets other far east in the Soviet Union in the town of Gorki. The sisters from the Soviet Union where in touch with the family when David was alive ( Via friends in Canada) but Moti lost touch with them since David Passed away in 1970. All the family members who lived in Kurenets perished. David gave reports to Yad Vashem; Leib Matusow was born in Smolevichi, Belorussia in 1874 to David and Khaia. He was a factory owner. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. He died in 1942 in Kurzeniec, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 29/05/1955 by his son David Chaja Ainbinder was born in Kurzeniec, Poland in 1895 to Leib and Sara Matosov. She was a housewife and a widowed. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Chaja died in 1942 in Kurzeniec, Poland at the age of 47. Her son Mendel (born in 1924) perished in December of 1941. Her daughter; Rachel ( born in 1927 perished with her on 9-9-1942. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1955 by her brother; David Fejgelson Doba Doba Fejgelson was born in Korzeniec, Poland in 1908 to Leib Matosov and Sara. She was a housewife and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Korzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Korzeniec, Poland. Doba died in 1942 in Korzeniec, Poland with daughters; Miryam (born in 1937) and Sara (born in 1940). This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 29/05/1955 by her brother David. Fejgelson Chaim Chaim Fejgelson was born in Wlodawa, Poland in 1909 to Yitzkhak. He was a merchant and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurnic, Poland. During the war was in Kurnic, Poland. Chaim died in 1941 in Osmiany, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 29/05/1955 by his brother-in-law David Gurewicz Genia Genia Gurewicz was born in Korzeniec, Poland in 1899 to Leib Matosov and Sara. She was a housewife and married to Samuel. Prior to WWII she lived in Korzeniec, Poland. Genia died in 1942 in Korzeniec, Poland with children; Avraham ( born 1930), Ytzhak ( 1933), Meir ( 1935), Sara ( 1938). This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her brother Daviv Samuel Gurewicz was born in Kurzeniec, Poland in 1900 to Shimon and Yente. He was a merchant and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Samuel died in 1941 in Lida. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 29/05/1955 by his brother-in-law -David--------- _----------------David married Dora Ziskind after the war. Dora was bornin Kurenets in 1918 to Frida ( died at age 97 in New York) and Leib Ziskind ( born in 1874 Kurenitz- died in 1978 New York at age 104 ) The Ziskinds had Daughters; Chazka, Rivka and Zina who survived the war with their parents ( in the forest) After the war they came from Germany to New York. Zina Koperberg lives today in Florida and keeps in touch with Moti. Dora had a brother; Mordechai Ziskind . Mordchai was a partisan abd was killed while fighting the Germans. Another sister; Yitka- perished in Kurenets
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- Sunday, October 16, 2005 at 13:32:54 (EDT)
My name is Moti Inbar Matosov. I am David Matosovs only son. It is a big excitement for me to see in the Kurenets site, pictures of my father. --yours sincerely-- Moti Inbar Matosov---- David Matosov wrote in the Yizkor book of Kurenets; A Small Remnant/by David Matosov--- (Translated by Eilat Gordin Levitan) As soon as Germany invaded Russia in June of 1941, I left Kurenets and joined many others in the waves of the storm to escape the Nazis, until I reached a town in Siberia by the name Novosbirsk, where I settled during the war years. After some time, we started hearing horrible rumors from refugees who arrived from the occupied areas. The rumors were about bloody massacres and annihilations carried out by Hitler's thugs against our people. My heart was filled with worries about the fate of my tortured brothers and particularly my dear family members who stayed in Kurenets, trapped in the jaws of the predatory beast. Everyday they came to my heart, and images of their bitter fate kept coming to me. These images were very disturbing, so disturbing that I couldn't get any rest. I knew very well what the Nazi monsters were like. I experienced their cruelty personally during the days when I was a POW of the Germans in 1939. I could hardly wait for the day when the evil rulers would be annihilated. Though my heart was filled with worries and anxiety. Despite all the rumors and all the news I received, I still had some hope that one day I would see the town of Kurenets with its Jews the way I wanted to see it, but to my great sorrow it was never to be. Finally the war reached an important point. The Russians had their first victories in battle and the Nazis started retreating from the Red Army, which took control of the situation, going from victory to victory and town after town was freed from the hands of the invaders. At the beginning of June of 1944, I went to the town of Gorki. This was a time of summer vacation for me and I wanted to spend it with my sisters who lived in Gorki ever since the first World War. Everyday I sat by the radio and listened with great anticipation (bated breath?) to every bit of news from the front. And here, on one summer day, the announcer, Levitan, announced in Russian, "Today, after bitter, cruel, and prolonged battles, our splendid army freed from the oppression of the Nazis, the towns Ilia, Kriviczi, Kurenets, Dolhinov, Vileyka" My excitement and anticipation kept increasing, and in my imagination I was already back in my Kurenets. Despite the fact that I knew very clearly that my brothers, the sons of my nation were annihilated almost entirely, I still hoped in the depths of my heart, that maybe someone from my large family in the area had survived. The thought of returning to Kurenets would not let go of me, not even for a minute, and after a sleepless night I woke up early in the morning, determined to go there. My sisters tried to stop me from immediately leaving since the war still going on. Maybe they were right. They knew that The entire area of Kurenets was still in a war situation and there were pockets of fighting all around, but all their reasoning could not prevent me from going. A day later, with a small suitcase in my hand, dressed in a Red Army uniform, I left on my way. I experienced an unbelievable journey embarking on the very extensive and intricate road from Gorki, which was situated Far East from Moscow, all the way to Kurenets. Renowned diaries of adventurers that I used to read in my youth were nothing by comparison to all that I experienced during that journey, where the roads were destroyed and many of the trains never reached their destinations, consequently I had to rely on every kind of transportation, including my feet. After eight days and nights I arrived in Vileyka. From Vileyka it was impossible to find any transportation, so in the usual tradition of the Kurenetsers, I walked to my hometown by foot. It was a beautiful summer day. With each step closer to Kurenets, my heart beat faster, and my head would spin. Would I find amongst the ruins, which I was told about on the road, any of my family members alive? While I was walking the ancient cedar trees, I saw from afar, an image of a man coming towards me. When he came closer I recognized him, it was a goy by the name of Kasia Siamka's. He was our neighbor in previous years. He also recognized me. With all the excitement, we kissed each other. At that point, I didn't know that Kasia was a collaborator with the Nazis and that his hands were stained with the blood of the Jews. I asked him, "Kasia, who is alive from my family?" Kasia didn't answer anything, he only bowed his head, not looking at me. I didn't ask anymore. I understood the tragedy in its entirety. I said goodbye to him and continued walking ahead, but without any excitement and with no anticipation. I knew now that I would not find any of the dear ones alive, and soon I would enter a huge graveyard that was named Kurenets. Here I reached the first homes on Vileyka Street and as a person who is walking inside a horrible nightmare, I approached the market square. And all of a sudden Empty space Only the tall chimneys came up from the ruins. All the houses that used to be in the central market and the nearby streets had disappeared I didn't meet one living soul. I stood in silence at the middle of the market, not knowing where I should go from here, the empty market. Suddenly I saw two figures walking from afar, near the ruins of the house of Zalman Gvint Z"L. Those two figures were coming close to where I was standing. They were two Jewish girls. I recognized them as Freydl the daughter of Mendel Alperovich, and the other was Hana, the daughter of Chaim Avraham Alperovich. They didn't recognize me. I introduced myself and together we started walking towards the few houses that remained intact. The first remaining house was in Kosyul (?) and until the edge of Myadel Street. We sat on the front porch of the house of Ruven Dimmenstein Z"L, and one by one, the few Jewish remainders started coming there. The Jewish residents of my hometown who had stayed were broken, lacking any energy. They were all in shock and depression. They came to me and greeted me. The entire evening, until midnight, we sat there and I listened to their stories of grief and mourning for the annihilated town and its people. Now, when I think of it, I can hardly remember what I felt that moment. All I can remember is that I couldn't say a word. IT was as if I became frozen. The images of the tortures of the martyrs and the pain of their last moments kept coming to my eyes, but as much as I tried to really comprehend what happened, I could not help but ask, "Is this a nightmare? How could this be true? No, no, it is a nightmare." Reality, reality, reality. The conclusion was very cruel. From the two thousand souls that our Jewish town contained, only about 100 survived. The family of Natka Hana's invited me to stay with them, and I couldn't sleep that night. At early morning hours I lay down for a few minutes, but as soon as the sun came up, I left the house to see the place where the town's Jews were annihilated. It was a small field near the house of Dov-Bar Shulman Z-L. A beautiful summer morning, filled with excitement was teeming around me The sun came up with all its glory as I experienced many days before. And there I stood, like a pillar of stone, on that piece of land that was saturated with the blood and the dust of all those who were once the people of my town, my friends, my relatives, and my dear family. My dear ones, what were your crimes and your sins that such a horrible punishment was given to you? Weren't your lives a life of honest toil? The life of people who day and night worked for the welfare of your families? To educate your children, and to keep the rules of God and the rules of the state of which you were citizens? Why were you given such an awful penalty? What did you feel when you knew that you had reached your last moments and cruel death that the wolf-like people prepared for you? My dear and honored father, did you forgive me for saving myself while leaving you there? I fell on the wet meadow that already grew on top of the huge grave of the martyrs and tears streamed unstoppably from my eyes to the land. Already that day, after I paid my respects at the cemetery of my dear mother, Z-L, I was ready to leave Kurenets forever, but the remnants who were left there didn't let me accomplish my decision. They begged me to stay there so that together we could get revenge on and bring to justice all the Christians that robbed the victims and spilled their blood, and collaborated with the Nazis. Twenty-one months I sat in Kurenets. Every day I heard from the remnants as well as a few righteous Christians testaments of the annihilation of the Jewish residents of Kurenets. I heard and recorded testaments of each of the more than one thousand people who perished in Kurenets. I was told that there were about four minyans, among them also my father's, who would meet and pray during the Nazi era. My father prayed in the minyan of Rabbi Zishka Z-L that was situated in the yard of Zalman Gvint Z-L. On the day of the annihilation, 9/9/1942 (the Hebrew date is Kafzain in the month of Alul, Taf Shin Bet, three days before Rosh Hashanah), my father and others were praying in the minyan and from there they were taken to the locale of the annihilation in the central market. When they started with the action, my father and Leib Dinnestein Z-L, covered themselves in their tallits and jumped into the fire, yelling, Shma Israel! In this act they brought glory to God's name. A Christian man by the name of Bakatz, a very dear person from Vileyka Street told me that on noon of that day that the action took place in the midst of the most active moment of the killings. He decided to go there, to the killing field, so that one day he could tell the next generation of the details of what he saw and heard. He walked through the fields and gardens and the Stiyenka, and when he came near he heard the yells and the cries that reached the heavens. Here and there he saw bodies all along the way. He kept seeing bodies all along the road, Jews who mostly likely tried to escape, but the killer's bullets had caught them. Bakatz told me that in the yard of Ruven Zishka Z-L, there was the naked body of a young Jewish girl, and all of a sudden there was a storm and a big leaf flew in the air, and fell on the young girl's body and covered her intimate parts. Bakatz continued saying, It seemed to me that the heart of Mother Nature filled with pity for the martyred girl, and Mother Nature was ashamed to watch her miserable nakedness. Yet not far from here, people who lost all resemblance to human beings, amidst bestial ceremony, killed without any shame. Bakatz told me that he couldn't be there anymore. The smell of the burning bodies was unbearable, so he returned home. No, no, I cannot continue recounting the details. I don't have the spiritual force to continue with the details. A few words on a little wooden plaque that we put on the killing field told that here were buried such a number of people, women and children, and here the fate of almost two thousand people that once were the holy community of Kurenets perished. Days and weeks passed, and Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur came, and we decided to have ceremonies during those days, ceremonies of public prayer. The people who came to pray were very different than the usual we'd see in the Jewish synagogue. Most were very young. There were a few older people, but you could hardly find one Jew that looked respectable enough, having a long beard, for example, to walk in front of the ark. Despite all of that, we celebrated everything as Jews were accustomed to. We started with a prayer. They gave me the assignment of going in front of the ark during the minha prayer of Yom Kippur. Filled with emotions of fear and excitement and nervousness, I started praying. I remember the old Hazans and leaders of prayers in Kurenets. I remember Reb Itzhak Zimmerman Z-L, Itzi Hatzi's [father of Charles Gelman], he had the most beautiful voice. His Hebrew was lively and his diction was pure and perfect. I remember Reb Mendel Alperovich [father of Rachel Alperovich, Emma Tzivoni, and Eliyahu], the husband of Nachama Risha, that had such a sweet voice, filled with sentiments and would reach the depths of your heart. He would pray the morning prayer of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur and the last I remember was Zusia Benes, who prayed with dedication and excitement and with Hasidic fervor, and until this very day I remember his beautiful kaddish prayer. So then, while I was praying, I tried very hard to imitate his beautiful kaddish prayer. Many times I prayed in my life, but I do not remember any other prayer that had such tragic sentiment and such a broken heart as my prayer that day. Depressed and in shock, shadows of men, we stood there, the remnants of our town. Tiny remnants from a splendid holy community, and our tears flowed like a river
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- Friday, October 14, 2005 at 12:59:37 (EDT)
Subject: searching for my half brother From: moosenr@aol.com Date: Thu, 13 Oct 2005 09:19:05 -0400 X-Message-Number: 21 I am trying to get information about my half brother. He was a child during the holocaust. He and his parents came from Leipzig to Italy and were in Ferramonte. His father's name was Jakob Buchaster. Jakob Buchaster died in Auschwitz. His mother was named Paula Falek Buchaster. She survived both Auschwitz and Bergen Belsen and emigrated to the United States where she married Herman Speier. I am the daughter of Paula and Herman Speier. Paula and Jakob Buchaster had a son named Manfred who was born on September 13, 1938. I have two different addresses where they resided in Italy: Viale delle Argonne XX, Milano (1939) and Via Ginlio Ubesti XX Milano (dates unknown). They were deported from Ferramonte to Auschwitz in about 1943. As I said, Paula survived and Jakob died. My mother had always told me that she gave Manfred to a family to hide, but on the Yad Vashem Vebsite it lists Manfred as possibly haven been given to a Monastery. I have been trying to determine if he is alive. The papers on the Yad Vashem Website that provide this information are stamped by the Unione Delle Comunita Israeltische Italiane. I would so much appreciate any help you can give me in finding information about Manfred Buchaster. My e mail is moosenr@aol.com or speiers@pi.cpmc.columbia.edu . Please contact me and let me know how I can find out if my half brother is alive, or what happened to him. Thank you very much for any help you can provide Sandy Speier Klein New Rochelle, N.Y. United States of America
Sandy Klein <moosenr@aol.com>
- Friday, October 14, 2005 at 10:14:34 (EDT)
Moti Inbar Matosov (motinbar@yahoo.com) on Thursday, October 13, 2005 at Message: Thank you very much ! -------------------- Are Moti and Inbal Matosov related to David ( son of Leib) Matosov of Kurenets? You could read his story in the Kurenets Yizkor book.
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- Thursday, October 13, 2005 at 19:30:03 (EDT)
Rev Edwin Goldberg of Manhattan ---------------(edgoldbergnewyork@yahoo.com) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Message: This is a wonderful document (Website) and one which thousands of families can follow in maintaining their heritage and family history.
Edwin Goldberg
USA - Sunday, October 09, 2005 at 17:50:33 (EDT)
Sharon Mann Oryan, ( ronymo@gmail.com - To : Eilat Gordin Levitan, (researcher code 75169) - Subject : The JewishGen Family Finder: ======================================================= My grandfather, Moshe Nathan Alperowicz, born in 1910, left Dolhinov in the early 1930's for Israel. His parents were Avraham and Sarah, and one of his brothers, who also came to Israel around that time, was Yehuda. Is this family known to you?
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- Sunday, October 09, 2005 at 17:44:10 (EDT)
I have relatives from Druya, Belarus. This was once part of Lithuania, Vilna gubernya. It also borders with Latvia, and I dont think it was ever part of latvia, but some of my relatives called themselves Latvians. I would assume it was because either they originated from over the border, or they did so much travel and commerce within Latvia, that they figured they were Latvians. I don't know enough about thehistory and ethnicity of that region (north western Belarus) to know for sure. Steve Bloom Farmville, VA
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USA - Thursday, October 06, 2005 at 23:11:23 (EDT)
The Disna Uyezd Research Group (DURG) of the LitvakSIG is happy to announce the acquisition of the 1875 lists of male residents in the Disna Uyezd. This includes the shtetlach of Bildziugi, Disna, Druya, Germanovici, Glubokoye, Golubicy, Leonpol, Luzhek, Plisa, Postovy, and Sharkovshina. The first of the lists to be translated and send to DURG members is for Glubokoye. For more information about these list and/or membership contact Batya Olsen, DURG Coordinator, at -- Batya Matzkin Olsen, Concord, Massachusetts USA Researching: EISENSHMID/AJZENSHMIDT [any spelling] (Tsikhovolya, BY), KAYOTSKY (Vidzy, BY), KELMAN, KLONER (Postavy/Smorgon, BY), MANFELD (Smorgon), MANFIELD (Sterling, Ill., US), RUNKIN, MATZKIN (Vidzy & anywhere), ROSENBLUM (Postavy), SCHARER
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USA - Thursday, October 06, 2005 at 23:07:45 (EDT)
Information for Richard Astor (nee Aberstein); ------------------------- ANNA ABERS age 58 and ROBERT ABERS ( nee Aberstein) age  76 ( information from people search)  4600 VIA DOLCE MARINA DEL REY CA 90292 (310)  ? He gave reports for his mother and brother who perished; ------------------------ Abersztein Falek---- Falek Abersztein was born in Turek, Poland in 1939 to Yosef and Lea Trzaskala. He was a baby. Prior to WWII he lived in Turek, Poland. During the war was in Turek. Falek died in 1942 in Chelmno at the age of 2. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 10/10/2004 by his brother Robert Abers from 4600 VIA DOLCE MARINA DEL REY CA 90292 United   States ------------- Lea Abersztein nee Trzaskala was born in Turek, Poland. She was married. Lea died in 1942 in Chelmno at the age of 38. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 08/09/2004 by her son from United states.  More Details...  4600 VIA DOLCE MARINA DEL REY CA 90292 ----------------- Jaakob Abersztejn was born in Poland in 1888 to Avigdor. He was a merchant and married to Pesia nee Ovsivitz. Prior to WWII he lived in Zdzieciol, Poland. During the war was in Zdzieciol, Poland. Jaakob died in Zdzieciol, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his daughter; Chana Zahavi or Zahari in Hedera, Israel------------------ Abersztejn Pesia Pesia Abersztejn was born in Poland in 1886. to Nechemia and Saha? She was a housewife and married to Yaakov. Prior to WWII she lived in Zdzieciol, Poland. During the war was in Zdzieciol, Poland. Pesia died in Zdzieciol, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her daughter --------------- Abersztejn Arje Arje Abersztejn was born in Poland in 1914 to Jaakob and Pesia. He was a merchant and married to Pesha nee Alpert. Prior to WWII he lived in Zdzieciol ( Zatl), Poland. During the war was in Zdzieciol, Poland. Arje died in the Shoah with his wife and little boy whose name was not known to the family since he was born after they lost touch.. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his sister; Chana Zahari of Hedera, Israel------------- Abersztein Lea Abershtein Ester Ester Abershtein was born in Lodz, Poland in 1909 to Josefh. Ester died in Lodz at the age of 35. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 15/04/1999.  More Details...  ? Golbort nee Aberstein------------------------ Abersztejn Lazar Lazar Abersztejn was born in Lodz, Poland in 1902. He was a clerk and married to Mercze. Prior to WWII he lived in Lodz, Poland. During the war was in Warszawa, Poland. Lazar died in 1943 in Treblinka at the age of 41 with children; Yosef ( 1928) and Reizl (born 1927). This information is based on a Page of Testimony; ? Golbort nee Aberstein ---------------------- Abershtein Avraham Avraham Abershtein was born in Lodz, Poland to Yosef and Hinda. During the war was in Lodz, Poland. Avraham died in Lodz. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by ? Goldbort nee Aberstein------------------- Abershtain Jakob Jakob Abershtain was born in Mir, Poland. He was married to Nekhama nee grinberg. Prior to WWII he lived in Mir, Poland. During the war was in Mir, Poland. Jakob died in 1942 in Mir, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted.  More Details... ------------- thank you SO much for all this. some are definitely family (avraham, probably esther) -- my father's original name is ajzak aberstajn and the avraham listed (testimony from my 1st cousin hinda goldwirth) was his brother (and he had a sister called esther and his father was called josef). obviously i have to go to israel and find these people urgently! do you happen to know anyone in israel who cld help with tracking down (on a proper paid professional basis if appropriate)? many thanks indeed again. Richard You wrote. "..i'd love to find US relaitves..." You should write Mr. Robert Abers  ( son of Yosef Aberstein- picture attached, grandson of Moshe Aberstein) 4600 Via Dulce, Marina Del Rey, California (who must be a holocaust survivor from Turek in the region of Lodz, born c 1930). In my search of ancestry.com; Listed American Abersteins who did not change their last names; View Record Name Spouse City State Phone Number Residence Years View Record Kreina Aberstein    Beverly Hills  California  313-275-6774 1993 View Record Kreina Aberstein    Beverly Hills  California  310-275-6774 1995 View Record Stephen R Aberstein    Farmington  Michigan  248-851-8000 1998 View Record Stephen R, Atty Aberstein    Farmington Hills  Michigan 810-851-8000 1997 View Record Stephen R, Atty Aberstein    Farmington Hills  Michigan 810-851-8000 1997 I think that they all passed away before 2000 and if they had children it might be daughters who changed their last name. I found; Trader: David Aberstein Links: Email ( you could find it by googling his name), Location: Charleston, SC USA people finder said; "We found 0 matches for living Aberstein" ----------------------------------- The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire of 1911; Identified Dead; ABERSTEIN, JULIA, 30 years. In another site of The Triangle Shirtwaist Facory Fire ; OBERSTEIN, Julia, 19, fractured skull. 53 Avenue A. Identified by her brother-in-law, Isaac Kaplan. Name also given as Aberstein. Multiple newspapers, March 27 ----------------------------- The Committee of Zion Association in Turek (page 37 of the Yizkor book) From right to left: Y. Aberstein, In executive and organizational capacity, men of substance and learning offered their services, men like ...Josef Aberstein Perished in Turek;  ABERSTEIN Josef and his wife  ABERSTEIN Mosze and family;  Abersztein Moshe  Moshe Abersztein was born in Turek, Poland. He was a merchant and married to Hana. Prior to WWII he lived in Turek, Poland. During the war was in Turek, Poland at Kaliska 21. Moshe died in 1942 in Chelmno. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 08/10/2004 by his grandson Robert Abers ( nee Aberstein) from 4600 Via Dulce, Marina Del Rey, California, United states Abersztejn Hana  Hana Abersztejn was born in Turek, Poland. She was a housewife and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Turek, Poland. During the war was in Turek, Poland. Hana died in 1942 in Chelmno at the age of 65. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 18/08/2004 by her grandson Robert Abers from United states Abersztein Falek  Falek Abersztein was born in Turek, Poland in 1939 to Yosef and Lea Trzaskala. He was a baby. Prior to WWII he lived in Turek, Poland. During the war was in Turek. Falek died in 1942 in Chelmno at the age of 2. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 10/10/2004 by his brother Robert Abers from United states. Abersztein Lea  Lea Abersztein nee Trzaskala was born in Turek, Poland. She was married. Lea died in 1942 in Chelmno at the age of 38. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 08/09/2004 by her son from United states.  ------------------- gravestones in the Bendorf-Sayn, Germany, Jewish cemetery; ABERSTEIN Unmarked grave found in Jakoby Institute records The English part of the Yizkor book is at; http://www.zchor.org/turek/yizkor.htm You could find the picture at; http://66.102.7.104/search?q=cache:GBppOtu95E8J:www.zchor.org/turek/turek.htm+aberstein+turek&hl;=en From right to left: Y. Aberstein is first. In the book he ( Yosef) is reported as perished in the holocaust, I could not find a report for him by his son. His son reported  His grandfather Moshe Aberstein, his grandmother, his mother and his brother. Did the father perish in the holocaust? did the people who wrote the book know that a son survived? They wrote; Josef Aberstein and family ( they should have noted it if they knew) I found that the Israeli Abersteins were active in the Turek Association of Israel ("Landsmanschaft") who  erected a memorial at the Jewish Cemetery in Turek 2003. There is another picture down on the same page; Commemoration of the Jewish cemtery  thanks to the Turek municipality, Machra Adamow and descendants of the families: Aberstein, Bikowski, Widawski, Seife, Jachimowicz, Marber, Czaskala, Kibel,  Rozencwajg (Podchalebnik), Szmul, Szubinski,  Apt, Guttmacher, Plotka, Rasz, L. Seiffe- Do you know the Israeli family ( there is a picture of the people who came from Israel to Turek for the commemoration, without their names. I googled Aberstein in Hebrew and only found two notes; I am pasting the first About Asaf Aberstein age 29. if you don't know hebrew- He refused  ( Seruv ) to serve in the occupied territoris as reserve soldier and was jailed The other story is about Susan Aberstein  ( changed her name to Samuel) from Yorkshire, England who had a child with her female lover. Abershtein* Yaakov  Yaakov Abershtein was born in Zitl, Poland to Avigdor and Khaim. He was a merchant. Prior to WWII he lived in Zitl, Poland. During the war was in Zitl, Poland. Yaakov died in 1942 in Zitl, Poland at the age of 57. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 18/05/1999 by his daughter Bela Ravanzor phone # in Raanana Israel; 09 771 5185 Abershtein* Pesia  Pesia Abershtein was born in Zitl, Poland to Nekhemia. Prior to WWII she lived in Zitl, Poland. During the war was in Zitl, Poland. Pesia died in 1942 in Nowogrodek, Poland at the age of 48. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 18/05/1999 by her daughter. Bela Ravanzor phone # in Raanana Israel; 09 771 5185 Abershtein Tzipora*  Tzipora Abershtein was born in Zitl, Poland. Prior to WWII she lived in Zitl, Poland. During the war was in Zitl, Poland. Tzipora died in 1942 in Nowogrodek, Poland at the age of 40. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 18/05/1999 by her cousin Bela nee Aberstein who lives in an old home in Achuza Street, Raanana  Abershtein* Arie  Arie Abershtein was born in Zitl, Poland to Yaakov and Pesia. He was a merchant. Prior to WWII he lived in Zitl, Poland. During the war was in Zitl, Poland. Arie died in 1942 in the Shoah at the age of 28. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 18/05/1999 by his sister.  More Details... Name   Town   District   Region   Country   Birth Date   Source   Abersztajn Regina  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1898  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Jehuda  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1932  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Hinda  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1937  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Dina  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1905  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Ruchla  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1906  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Ebrnsztajn Szejna  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1885  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Ebrnsztajn Wolf  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1877  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Jakob  ZDZIECIOL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1890  Page of Testimony  Eberstein Menahem          1906  list of Hungarian labor battalions victims  Abersztejn Hana  TUREK  TUREK  LODZ  POLAND  1877  Page of Testimony  Abersztein Moshe  TUREK  TUREK  LODZ  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Abersztein Falek  TUREK  TUREK  LODZ  POLAND  1939  Page of Testimony  Abersztein Lea          1904  Page of Testimony  Abershtein Ester          1909  Page of Testimony  Abershtein Avraham            Page of Testimony  Aberstein' :" name=description_en> Aberstein' :" name=description_he> Aberstein' :" name=description_zz> Place of Residence Name   Town   District   Region   Country   Birth Date   Source   Abersztajn Szeina  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1936  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Dawid  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1909  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Malka  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1901  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Ruchla  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1906  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Josek  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1938  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Regina  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1898  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Josef  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1938  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Chana  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1903  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Malka  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1931  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Szeine  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1936  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Ruchla  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1906  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Dawid  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1909  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Ruchla  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1906  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Szejna  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1931  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Malka  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1931  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Source   Aberstein Izaak  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1934  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Matylda  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1899  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Chaim  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1901  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Sara  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1926  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Chana  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1929  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Jakub  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1931  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Izack  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1934  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Regina  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1898  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Abe  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1909  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Ruchla  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1906  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Malka  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1931  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Szajndla  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1937  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Dawid  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1919  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Malka  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1931  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Abersztajn Szajna  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1936  list of Lodz Name   Town   District   Region   Country   Birth Date   Source   Obersztajn Yosef          1929  Page of Testimony  Aberstein Israel  ZDZIECIOL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Minie  RASEINIAI  RASEINIAI    LITHUANIA  1905  Page of Testimony  Abershtain Elka  MIR  STOLPCE  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Abershtain Nehama  MIR  STOLPCE  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Abersztajn Mercze  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1904  Page of Testimony  Abersztejn Arje  ZDZIECIOL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1914  Page of Testimony  Abersztejn Jaakob  ZDZIECIOL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1888  Page of Testimony  Abershtain Shmerel  MIR  STOLPCE  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Abershtain Reuven  MIR  STOLPCE  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Abershtain Hana  MIR  STOLPCE  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Abersztejn Lazar  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1902  Page of Testimony  Aberstein Zecharia  ZDZIECIOL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1912  Page of Testimony  Abersztejn Pesia  ZDZIECIOL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1886  Page of Testimony  Abershtain Haya  MIR  STOLPCE  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Name   Town   District   Region   Country   Birth Date   Source   Abershtein Elka  ZDZIECIOL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Abershtein* Arie  ZITL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Turetzki Khana  LIDA  LIDA  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Abershtein* Reuven  DZHITOL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Abershtein* Yaakov  ZITL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Abershtein* Pesia  ZITL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Abershtein Sheina*  ZDZIECIOL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Abershtein Tzipora*  ZITL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Aberstein Zecharia  ZDZIECIOL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1912  Page of Testimony  Aberstein Chana  ZDZIECIOL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1917  Page of Testimony  Aberstein Leib  ZDZIECIOL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1914  Page of Testimony  Rabic Scheine  ZDZIECIOL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1920  Page of Testimony  Aberstein Pessia  ZDZIECIOL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1892  Page of Testimony  Aberstein' :" name=description_en> Aberstein' :" name=description_he> Aberstein' :" name=description_zz>           Birth Date   Source   Abershtain Jakob  MIR  STOLPCE  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Abersztejn Sharjau  ZDZIECIOL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1910  Page of Testimony  Ebersztejn Iche  SUCHOWOLA  SOKOLKA  BIALYSTOK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Eberstein Schene  JASINOWKA  BIALYSTOK  BIALYSTOK  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Abershtain Matel  SAMBOR  SAMBOR  LWOW  POLAND    Page of Testimony  Torecki Chana  ZDZIECIOL  NOWOGRODEK  NOWOGRODEK  POLAND  1902  Page of Testimony  Lewin Lena  BENDORF  KOBLENZ  RHINE PROVINCE  GERMANY  1874  list of victims from Germany  Aberstein Josef  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1938  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Rywen  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1928  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Rywon  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1928  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Chaim  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1902  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Matylda  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1899  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Sara  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1926  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Chana   LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1929  list of Lodz ghetto inmates  Aberstein Jakob  LODZ  LODZ  LODZ  POLAND  1931  list of Lodz ghetto inmates 
.-
- Thursday, October 06, 2005 at 18:00:40 (EDT)
I would like to inquire about Yivsei Yeshayahu Gordin who was married to Bela (1870 - ?). They had two sons, Binyamin (1898 - ?) a specialist in thermodynamics and David, mathematician. Bela was a descendent of Velvel Wolf Shmelkes (son of Shmuel) Cohen Kagan (1820 -1900) from Vitebsk. Do you have any connection and information. Shana Tova, ------ Yosi Dror
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Israel - Thursday, October 06, 2005 at 17:39:01 (EDT)
Subject: LANDA family and R' Chaim of Volozhin -----------------------------------------------` I fielded this question several times but I'll try again: I am researching a possible connection to R' Chaim of Volozhin. The clues I have are as follows: According to a scribbled note, not very reliable, written by a family member my gggrandmother, Sarah Hinde (nee SCHATZ daughter of Yosef - the name SCHATZ may only be his profession and not his actual family name) KANTOR, was a descendant of R' Chaim through a LANDA grandchild. According to the book "Etz Chaim" by M. Zinovitz (1972) R' Yitzaleh, the son of R' Chaim had a daughter Raichel, who married R' Shmuel LANDA. This couple died at a young age leaving a daughter, who married Chaim Hillel FRIED, father of, among others, the well known BEN-SASSON family and another son. Our problem with this is that another daughter is not mentioned and we know of no connection to the FRIED/BEN-SASSON family (who we know well). Of course it's possible that the LANDA couple had other children not mentioned in the book. Two other clues are: According to a family rumour, R' Mordechai Gimple YAFFE, who was a student in Volozhin and possibly a distant relative of the Volozhin family, and Rabbi of Yehud in Israel, told my gguncle that he (my uncle) was a descendant of R' Chaim. It is noted in another family source that this ancestry was brought up in the house of R' Mordechai of Ruzanoi (R'Mordechai YAFFE ?) We also have a family tradition that R' Yitzaleh was the "shushvin" (accompying the bride down the aisle) at my gggrandmother's wedding (due to the premature death of her parents?). All the above seem to strengthen the theory of our connection with R' Chaim of Volozhin but I would be happy to hear from other sources who could corraborate this theory. The reason that I mentioned above regarding the reliability of the original note was that it mentioned also a possible connection with the Gaon of Vilna and after some research it seems that this link was put to rest. Thank you for any suggestions on other books which you know contain details on the Volozhin family or personal knowledge of the family. Shavua tov and Shana tova to one and all. Yoni
`
- Sunday, October 02, 2005 at 03:03:27 (EDT)
From Yad Vashem reports of Jews who perished; Ilona Ziberlain nee Slavskaya (Slavsky) was born in Poland in 1881 to Sigizmund and Reveka. She was a pharmacist and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Novofastov, Ukraine. During the war was in Novofastov, Ukraine. Ilona died in 1942 in Novofastov, Ukraine. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/2000 by her neighbour, a Shoah survivor. Daniel Rosental gave the report in Russian
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- Tuesday, September 27, 2005 at 19:16:35 (EDT)
I am trying to find my mother's mother's family; Rachel Izenberg Slavsky---- Baruch (Barney) Slavsky--- Faygela Slavsky (child)----- They came to America after a large pogrom from "Viloshna" in the early 1900s... I am trying to find if we have any survivors in America or in Israel. I did not know I was Jewish until recently... It was hidden due to persecution. If anyone has any information at all, Please email me or call me at 609 892 2130 ------------ Anna Pecoraro (annpecoraro@yahoo.com) on
Anna Pecoraro
USA - Tuesday, September 27, 2005 at 19:05:16 (EDT)
Nancy Efron Schimmel (Norfe55@cs.com) on --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Message: I am trying to find out more info on my grandmothers side of the family. She was Rebecca Zaveloff (or Zaveloffsky when in Russia) from Kossowa, Belarus. She came to New York around 1910 via Philadelphia (I think because there is no such name on the Ellis Island lists). She came with her father Meier. She worked and brought her mother, Chana Sora and sister Jennie. She then brought her brothers Abraham, Israel, Samuel and Willy. One brother, Aaron did not come right away because he was in a Yeshiva. She married my grandfather, Benzion Efron and had 3 children, Helen, Martin and Seymour. I grew up in Princeton, NJ where they bought a farm around 1950. Do any of these names sound familiar to anyone. My great uncle Abraham Zaveloff went back to Kossowa but didn't find anyone that he knew. Everyone that is old enough to remember has passed away now and I feel the need to know more and have no one to ask. Wouldn't you know that when I get the itch the jewishgen website i! s down due to hurricane Rita. Any help would be appreciated. You can write to me at Norfe55@cs.com Thanks!! Nancy ------------------------------------------------
Nancy Efron Schimmel <Norfe55@cs.com>
- Monday, September 26, 2005 at 10:59:03 (EDT)
Judith Chodosh (Chodosz) Goldman(Rebbetzin) (rav1@isp.com) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Message: Dear Friends, ---------------------------------------------------- My family came from Rechke, a small hamlet near Kurenits. My father was a"h Chaim Meir Chodosz and my mother Libe Shifrah Alperovicz Chodosz. My father became a Partisan under Mironovich's brigade and saved many lives. He led many missions. My father owned a water mill in Malishke. My paternal grandmother a"h was Libe Gordin Chodosz and my grandfather Dr. Chevel Chodosz. My great grandfather Mordechai Chodosz was a Dr. who also had semicha. He founded Borisov hospital. Mordechai had three brothers and a sister, Velvel,Yitzchok, and sister Chana. My maternal grandfather was Rabbi Yehuda Chaim Alperovicz and my grandmother was Pessia Chana Ginzburg Alperovicz. They had six daughters and a son. Tzirke,Zlate,Ite, Sarah, Frade and Libe (my mother)and their son Yoseph. They married into the following families Kashdan,Rubin,Kabilnik,etc. Is there anyone out there who knew my family. The Chodosz family was very well known in the region. A relative in the Chodosz family was one of the rabbis in the Vilna shul. Please respond to this e-mail. A lot of the names you have listed in your site are familiar. My parents knew a Chana Svirski, Rubin and Esther Livitan, my grandmother was a Gordin etc. Wishing you a wonderful New Year, a year of Peace, Good Health, Joy and Nachas and Prosperity. Our steps are resounding. Sincerely, Judy Goldman
Judith Chodosh (Chodosz) Goldman (Rebbetzin) <rav1@isp.com>
- Monday, September 26, 2005 at 10:53:17 (EDT)
Deborah (Sheftelman) Racey (racey@peoplepc.com) Message: Searching for SHEFTELMAN or SHEFELMAN descendants and any photos that may be available. I grew up in a very tight lipped family and unfortunately I know little about their ancestory. I was told years ago I would never be able to track records that would reach back to atleast Odessa Russia. I am counting on modern technology to help me trace the trip back into time and learn more about who we are and where we came from.
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- Friday, September 23, 2005 at 07:52:34 (EDT)
From: Mbg3927@aol.com > To: EilatGordn@aol.com > Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2005 15:31:06 EDT > ------------------- > My family came from Vasilishok with a family name of GORDON, looking for > any information on a Gordon that stayed in the shetel and was last heard of > in 1941. Milton B Gordon >-------------------- In the Yad Vashem site I found; Results of search for victims whose family name (including synonyms and maiden names) is 'Gordon' , and whose location (including synonyms) is 'Vasilishok' ----------------------------------------- Yaakov Gordon was born to Nakhum. He was a butcher. Prior to WWII he lived in Vasilishki, Poland. Yaakov died in Vasilishki, Poland at the age of 60. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 19/08/1998 by his grandson Shlomo Patashnik of Rishon Lezion ( he put his phone number), a Shoah survivor------------------- Dobra Gordon was born in Waszyliszki, Poland to Yaakov and Khana. She was married. Prior to WWII she lived in Waszyliszki, Poland. During the war was in Waszyliszki, Poland. Dobra died in Waszyliszki, Poland with her husband Zalman? and a child. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 19/08/1998 by her nephew, a Shoah survivor; Shlomo Patashnik of Rishon Lezion ( he put his phone number),---------------------- Nekha Ptashnik nee Gordon was born in Waszyliszki, Poland to Yaakov and Khana. She was married to Khaim. Prior to WWII she lived in Podbrodzie, Poland. Nekha died in 1941 in Podbrodzie at the age of 49. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/07/1999 by her son, a Shoah survivor; Shlomo Patashnik of Rishon Lezion ( he put his phone number),------------------ Gerszon Gordon was born in Wasiliszki, Poland in 1886 to Yermiyahu and Malka. He was a merchant and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Zaludek, Poland. During the war was in Zaludek, Poland. Gerszon died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 22/06/1956 by his nephew ( son of his brother; Zvi Gordon of Natania, Israel)--------------------------- Gordon Szlomo Szlomo Gordon was born in Wasiliszki, Poland in 1878 to Yermiyahu and Malka. He was a merchant and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Wilno, Poland. During the war was in Wilno, Poland. Szlomo died in 1941 in Wilno, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 22/06/1956 by his son Zvi Gordon of Natania, Israel---------------------- Gordon Chjena Chjena Gordon was born in Wilno, Poland in 1880 to Meir and Yenta. She was a housewife and married to Shlomo. Prior to WWII she lived in Wilno, Poland. During the war was in Wilno, Poland. Chjena died in Wilno, Poland at the age of 61. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 22/06/1956 by her son Zvi Gordon of Natania, Israel-------------------- Gordon Krajna Krajna Gordon was born in Nowi Dwor, Poland in 1897. She was a housewife and married to Yaakov. Prior to WWII she lived in Wasiliszki, Poland. During the war was in Wasiliszki, Poland. Krajna died in Wasiliszki, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her cousin. ... Akiva Gordon was born in Poland to Shimon and Sara. He was a ??? ??? ????? child. Prior to WWII he lived in Wasiliszki, Poland. During the war was in Wasiliszki, Poland. He died in 1943 in Majdanek at the age of 9. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 10/07/1999 by his second cousin from Israel Chaia Alpert of Raanana, a Shoah survivor. ...----------------- Khaia Gordon nee Zameshchanski was born in Poland to Pinkhas. She was a housewife and married to Yisrael. Prior to WWII she lived in Wasiliszki, Poland. During the war was in Wasiliszki, Poland. Khaia died in 1942 in Wasiliszki, Poland at the age of 35. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 10/07/1999 by her family Chaia Alpert , a Shoah survivor.----------------- Gordon Shimon Shimon Gordon was born in Poland. He was a hairdresser and married to Sara nee Kushnir. Prior to WWII he lived in Vasilishki, Poland. During the war was in Vasilishki, Poland. Shimon died in 1943 in Majdanek at the age of 35. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 10/07/1999 by his cousin Chaia Alpert from Israel, a Shoah survivor ----------------------- Gordon Sara Sara Gordon nee Kushnir was born in Poland to Alter and Shprintza. She was a housewife and married to Shimon. Prior to WWII she lived in Wasiliszki, Poland. During the war was in Wasiliszki, Poland. Sara died in 1943 in Majdanek at the age of 32. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 10/07/1999 by her cousin from Israel, a Shoah survivor. ---------------- Gordon Frumet* Frumet Gordon was born in Wasiliszki, Poland in 1932 to Tankhum and Batia. She was a child. Prior to WWII she lived in Wasiliszki, Poland. Frumet died in Wasiliszki, Poland at the age of 10. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 25/06/1999 by her family from Israel ( Dora Sofer of Hertzelia).------------- Foster* Guta* Guta Foster nee Gordon. She was married. Prior to WWII she lived in Wasiliszki, Poland. During the war was in Wasiliszki. Guta died in 1942 in Wasiliszki, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 23/01/2000 by her niece Yafa Berlovitz of Tel Aviv ( there is a phone number).---------------- Gordon Chaim Chaim Gordon was born in Wasiliszki, Poland in 1888 to Avraham. He was a merchant and married to Nekha. Prior to WWII he lived in Wasiliszki, Poland. During the war was in Wasiliszki, Poland. Chaim died in 1942 in Wasiliszki, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 21/09/1956 by his neighbour-------------------- Gordon Jakow Jakow Gordon was born in Wasiliszki, Poland in 1896. He was a merchant and married to Chiena. Jakow died in 1941 in Wasiliszki, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 16/01/1957 by his cousin; Shlomo Berkovitz of Ramat Gan.------------------ Gordon Szymon Szymon Gordon was born in Swieciany, Poland in 1908. He was a hairdresser and married to Sara nee Kushnir. Prior to WWII he lived in Wasiliszki, Poland. During the war was in Szczuczyn, Poland. Szymon died in 1943 in Krasny, Russia. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/09/1956 by his relative Dr Avraham Alpert of Ramat Gan------------------- Gordon Josef Josef Gordon was born in Wasiliszki, Poland in 1913 to Yaakov and Nekhama. He was a teacher. Prior to WWII he lived in Wasiliszki, Poland. Josef died in 1942 in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 08/02/1956 by his friend---------------------------- Dobke Gordon was born in Wasiliszki, Poland to Jakov and Chenia. She was a flourmiller and married to Zelman. Prior to WWII she lived in Wasiliszki, Poland. During the war was in Wasiliszki, Poland. Dobke died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony----------------- submitted by hersisters' son; Potashnik Shlomo Gordon Jakov Jakov Gordon was born to Nakhum. He was a butcher and married to Chenia. Prior to WWII he lived in Wasiliszki, Poland. During the war was in Wasiliszki, Poland. Jakov died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1994 by his grandson ( The same Potashnik Shlomo)------------------------ the next must be a sister of Yaakov/ Jakov/ Jacob Gordon; Czesler Nechama Nechama Czesler nee Gordon was born in Vasilishki, Poland in 1880 to Nakhum/ Nochim and Rebecca. She was a housewife and a widow of Abraham. Prior to WWII she lived in Jashun, Poland. During the war was in Jashun, Poland. Nechama died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 18/03/1999 by her granddaughter : Vita Glass of London----------------------------- Flajszer Cypa Cypa Flajszer nee Gordon was born in Wasyliski, Poland in 1885 to Avraham and Rakhel. She was a housewife and married to Yitzkhak. Prior to WWII she lived in Wasyliski, Poland. During the war was in Zaludek, Poland. Cypa died in 1942 in Zaludek, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 23/12/1956 by Beba of Israel
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- Monday, September 19, 2005 at 18:32:00 (EDT)
Gail Samowitz (gsamowitz@yahoo.com) on Saturday, September 10, 2005 at 14:25:02 --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: Comment Home Page: http:// Message: Thanks you for your wonderful website. My father was Avrom Chaim Chanowicz and was born in 1911 in Minsk, but spent the first 11 years of his life in Horodok. His parents were Golda and Ben Zion Chanowicz. They eventually emigrated to NYC. Is there anyway I can contacts the people who submitted Rabinovich pictures on your website? I think I may be related to them. Thank you! Gail Samowitz in Seattle, WA USA
Gail Samowitz <gsamowitz@yahoo.com>
USA - Saturday, September 10, 2005 at 18:22:32 (EDT)
Moshe Bogomolsky of Kibbutz Lochamay Hagetaot called me today. Moshe was born 88 years ago in Braslav. During his youth Moshe was very involved with the Zionist youth movement. He was a member of Kibbutz Shachria in Poland and went to Hacshara (perpetration for agricultural life in Eretz Israel) in Baranovitz. ( later they established Kibbutz Shfaim, near Tel Aviv) Ironically, only a few years ago, Moshe learned that in 1939 he received papers to make Aliah to Eretz Israel. Cheina Bekman ( nee Bandt) of Braslav, who came to Israel in the 1990s told him about a conversation she heard in 1942. The conversation took place between her mother and the mother of Moshe, during the last day of their lives. They were incarcerated by the Germans and they knew they will not survive ( only Cheina managed to escape ) Moshes mother said how they hid the information from their son in 1939 not wanting to part from him and fearing for his life in Eretz Israel. In 1942 Moshe was far away in Soviet Asia. During the first days of the war , in June of 1941, he manged to escape with his brother, Chaim Bandt and a few others out of Braslav deep into the Soviet Union. In 1946 Moshe arrived in Poland. He met with his old friend; Ytxhak Zukerman ( antek) and from that point he joined Ytzhak and Zvia to Israel (after two years of incarceration in a Cyprus camp) First they came to kibbutz Yagur and from there to Kibbutz Lochamay hagetaot. Moshe called me in regards to the Braslav page which I created. He wanted to make sure that I include in the page; Emesh shoa; yad le-kehilot/gevidmet di kehiles Braslaw... English Title: Darkness and desolation; in memory of the communities of Braslaw, Dubene, Jaisi, Jod, Kislowszczizna, Okmienic, Opsa, Plusy, Rimszan, Slobodka, Zamosz, Zaracz Editor: Machnes Ariel, Klinov Rina Published: Israel 1986 Publisher: Association of Braslaw and Surroundings in Israel and America; Ghetto Fighters House and Hakibbutz Hameuchad Publishing House Pages: 636 Languages: H,Y,E Notes: 65 pages are in English. Moshe also told me to call the Maron family in New York who wrote in the book of Braslav about their amazing survival during the holocaust.
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- Tuesday, September 06, 2005 at 17:06:41 (EDT)
I would like to start a page for the shtetl Soly ( near Smorgon) if you have any pictures of fmily members who came from Soly please get in touch with me. A list of a few families who perished in Soly/ Sol; Kagan Shoshana -- Shoshana Kagan was born in Soly, Poland in 1908 to Moshe and Khana. She was a housewife and married to Arie and had two sons who perished with her. Prior to WWII she lived in Soly, Poland. During the war was in Soly, Poland. Shoshana died in Ponary, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 18/06/1956 by her brother; Aharon Avramovitz in Hedera, Israel. ... ----------------------------------------- Magids Yitzkhak - Yitzkhak Magids was born in Soly, Poland in 1902 to Khana. He was a grocer and married to Malka. Prior to WWII he lived in Soly , Poland. Yitzkhak died in Lebedjeva, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 03/06/1955 by his brother Yosef magids in Zichron Yaakov --------------------------------------------- Magids Jochewed - Jochewed Magids was born in Soly, Poland to Yaakov and Khana. She was a housewife and married to Mikhael. Prior to WWII she lived in Soly, Poland. During the war was in Soly, Poland. Jochewed died in Ponary, Poland at the age of 48. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 18/12/1985 by her daughter Sara Pozner in Zichron Yaakov --------------------------------- Szapira Icchak - Icchak Szapira was born in Soly, Poland in 1886 to Gedalia. He was a tailor and married to Bela. Prior to WWII he lived in Soly, Poland. During the war was in Soly, Poland. Icchak died in 1943 in Ponary, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/08/1956 by his son Shraga Shapira in Kiryat Yam. ... ---------------------------------------- Mostwiliszkier Lejba - Lejba Mostwiliszkier was born in Soly, Poland in 1883 to Shraga. He was a merchant and married to Malka nee Shapira. Prior to WWII he lived in Soly, Poland. During the war was in Soly, Poland. Lejba died in Ponary, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 18/06/1956 by his nephew Aharon Avramovitz in Hedera, Israel. --------------------------------- Mostweliszker Hinda --- Hinda Mostweliszker was born in Soly, Poland in 1909 to Yitzkhak and Bela. She was a housewife and married to Moshe. Prior to WWII she lived in Soly, Poland. During the war was in Soly, Poland. Hinda died in 1943 in Ponary, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/08/1956 by her brother Shraga Shapira in Kiryat Yam. ... ------------------------------------------------------- Reider Chaim ---- Chaim Reider was born in Soly, Poland in 1905. He was a merchant and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Kobylnik, Poland. Chaim died in 1941 in Kobylnik, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/12/1957 by his relative. Miryam Pialko in Kfar Saba ( daughter of his in law) ------------------------------------- Sidoriski Simkha ---- Simkha Sidoriski was born in Sol, Poland in 1935 to Avraham and Sheina. He was a pupil and single. Prior to WWII he lived in Sol, Poland. During the war was in Sol, Poland. Simkha died in 1942 in Ponary, Poland at the age of 6. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 03/05/1999 by his cousin Ella Shek from Bat Yam, a Shoah survivor -------------------------------------------- Sidoriska Szejna - Szejna Sidoriska was born in Soly, Poland to Avraham and Sara. She was a baker and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Soly, Poland. During the war was in Soly, Poland. Szejna died in 1945 in Ponary, Poland at the age of 43. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 05/07/1956 by her brother-in-law, (sister of his wife) ; Yaakov Levin in Kfar Chasidim.------------------------------------------ Ginzburg Chaja -- Chaja Ginzburg nee Ginzburg was born in Soly, Poland. She was married to Eliahu. Prior to WWII she lived in Soly, Poland. During the war was in Wilna. Chaja died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/12/1980 by her daughter Sonia Elishevitz kibbutz Dafna. ---------------------------------------- . Ginzburg Eliyahu - Eliyahu Ginzburg was born in Zuprany, Poland to Avraham and Miriam. He was married to Khaia. Prior to WWII he lived in Soly, Poland. During the war was in Charkow, . Eliyahu died in Charkow,at the age of 53. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/12/1980 by his daughter; Sonia Elishevitz kibbutz Dafna. ------------------------- \
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- Sunday, September 04, 2005 at 14:47:44 (EDT)
On August 6th, 2005 Anat Gefen (my only first cousin); Talia Levitan (my youngest daughter) and I flew from Israel to Vilna (Vilnius, Lithuania). Just the day before, Anat searched her house and found a passport and an address book which belonged to our grandfather; Solomon ( Shlomo) Gordin, who passed away in 1974. According to the passport, our grandfather was born in Rokiskis ( Rakishok), in the northeastern part of Lithuania near the Latvian border. . Long ago I researched the origin of the Gordin family and found that most of the Gordin families that lived in Riga c 1900 originated in the area near Dvinsk (Now Daugavpils, Latvia- near the borders with Lithuania and Belarus). The information Anat found suggested the same of our origin. We immediately decided to add Rokiskis to the towns we planed to visit in Lithuania. The address book from c 1965 contained addresses from around the world ( places like Argentina, New York , California and so on...) For us, most promising was an address in Russian ( Cyrillic) . Anat asked a Russian speaking person to read it and it was Red Army Street number 49 ,unit 2 in Riga no name appeared next to the address. I knew that the long lost family of my grandfathers' brother; Lova Gordin, lived on Red Army street in Riga in 1990 but I did not have a house number. I just had the street name. The information came from a relative of my grandmother who returned for a visited Riga c 1990 and ran in to the widow of Lova Gordin. She knew her in the 1950s. All she could tell me was that Lova and his wife had two sons and they lived with their mother on that street, she did not know any of their first names. Some years ago I posted pictures of my grandfathers relatives on line. I asked for help in identifying and finding them. If you check the "Gordin family" you would find many unrelated Gordins who wrote me- but there was no response about the people in the pictures. We visited about 30 towns and shtetls during our trip and we had many special moments. I will write detailed report and post pictures (some are already posted in new scenes) about our wonderful trip to Lithuania, Belarus, Latvia and Poland. I want to write about finding our "Gordins" in Riga when it is still fresh in my mind. We arrived by train from Belarus to Riga on Friday. We had tickets to fly from Riga to Krakow on Monday at 2;30 P. M.: We only had a weekend to find our relatives. The streets in Riga changed names. There are no more Soviet sounding street names in Riga. We made reservation for the first night in a beautiful hotel in the old town ( Vecriga) about a block away from the Opera house. As soon as we arrived we purchased tickets for the Opera and ballet for the next two nights ( they were very reasonably priced) after checking in we made the mistake of asking the very young and eager to please receptionist; what is the name of Red Army street now? She took a map and circled Brivibas street, which appeared to be a main street, about four short blocks from the hotel. Our top-floor suite was magnificent. It came with its own Jacuzzi, sauna and deck with views of the city and St. Peters tower. While my daughter and I enjoyed the special amenities that came with our hotel suite ( to compensate for the previous night which we spent in a train car going from Minsk to Riga) Anat arranged for a room for us for the next two nights at the Best Eastern Hotel Vecriga. ( our original hotel had a suite only for one night) Walking the cobble-stoned streets of the 15th-century Old Town of Riga was a very special experience. Surrounded by spectacular vistas of colorfully ornate buildings and monuments I could not help wondering if ninety years ago my grandparents walked here. ( they met in Riga c 1921 when my grandmother was about 15) At 8 A.M The next morning Anat returned. from her usual two hours walk. She walked to Brivibas street # 49- and found the public library. She said that # 49- 53 are one big complex and it does not appear like an apartment building. Either the numbers on the street were changed or the building changed its use. I called the information and asked for a Gordin on Brivibas street. I was told that there is no Gordin listed on such street, and there are about 30 Gordins listed in Riga. Since we had free wireless internet at the hotel my daughter wrote a note to the sig asking for help in locating relatives from an old address in Riga. (Incorrectly we emailed it to the Litvak sig and not to the Latvian) We checked in to the Best Eastern Hotel Vecriga ( there are pictures of the Dali Lama behind the reception desk. he stayed there some years ago) The very gracious receptionist was very sweet and caring. I said to her since you are so kind Ill ask you some questions I told her the story of the lost relatives and asked her if there is older well informed person around who could tell us about addresses from the 1960s. She said Yuris would be the person to help you. He should be at the restaurant in a few hours We went for early dinner since we had tickets to the ballet. As soon as we entered the restaurant we saw a nice looking older gentleman with air of sophistication. We asked if he was Yuris- he said that he was and asked to see the address of the relatives. He soon returned saying that they dont have a listed number at such address and suggested that we should go to the archives Monday morning. ( I also received many notes from members of the sig with address and information of the Latvian archives) We explained that we are leaving on Monday. Yuris said I could contact someone who could most likely find the information right away but it will cost you something We said fine, go ahead We told him that we think that the address was of Lova Gordin but we know that Lova passed away As we started eating the main course Yuris returned and said We found that Lova Gordins son is living in the same address, is name is Gari. There is no phone number listed for him but we called his neighbor and asked her to notify him that his relatives are waiting for him in the hotel Vecriga ( The service cost me $40) He handed us the name and phone number of the neighbor saying that she did not speak English. It was already Sunday morning and we heard nothing from Gari. We decided to walk to #49 Brivibas street. It was a lovely walk via a park, which was filled with local families celebrating the sunny weekend. #49 Brivibas street was just as Anat described. The first floor contained stores and a bank, on top was a big library and a small tower which seem to contain offices. Every thing was closed ( it was Sunday) We walked all around the complex and found no entrance. I stopped people who walked around and showed them the old address but no one could give me any information. Finally I tried the entrance door to # 47 which appeared to be a residential building. To my amazement the door to the lobby was not locked. A man came out of a first floor apartment/ office to greet me- he was obviously waiting for someone and left the door open. I showed him the old address and asked for his help. He said in perfect English You are at the wrong street, Red Army street is not Brivibas, it is Bruninteku. Bruninteku is about 3 blocks from here; He drew a map , continue walking on Brivibas, first it is Gertrudes then Stabu and the third street would be Bruninteku. I found Talia drinking tea at a small restaurant on Gertrudes and Anat who walked around checking the art novo architecture of the buildings. We walked to Bruninteku #49. When we arrived we found the door to the lobby locked and Unit 2 had the name Markova on it. We rang the bell for unit 2 but there was no answer. We went to a near by restaurant and used the cell phone to call the hotel. We asked that they should call the neighbor and let her know that we are waiting for her in the restaurant down the street. I could not wait, as I walked out of the restaurant I saw from a far a man leaving the building. I ran after him and showed him the address and asked him for help. He made a phone call on his cell phone and then let me in the building ( he spoke very little English and was in a hurry. Unit #2 had a huge door. I kept knocking but no one answered. I heard a person walking down the stairs. I came to greet him. I asked if he knew Mr. Gordin who was my long lost cousin. He said Yes, I know him but I dont know him well I asked Do you know why it is written Markova on his door? He said Markova was the name of his mother, she died this year I asked the nice man to go to the restaurant and ask my cousin and daughter to come to the building. I wanted to leave copies of the pictures of who might be the family as well as a note with our information in Russian which the hotel staff wrote for us. I did not want to leave since I will not be able to get back in. Soon Anat and Talia arrived. We were about to leave our note as a nice looking older woman came down the stairs. She informed us in broken English that she is Garis neighbor and she received a phone call from the hotel and came down to get us. We showed her the pictures and she immediately recognized as Lova , his wife Stachia (?) Markova, Gari and his younger brother Sacha, of whom she said Living in the United State!! We asked her to go eat with us, she said I must stay here and wait for gari, he did not come home last night- maybe tonight It was Monday morning, we did not hear from Gari. I wanted to send flowers to Garis neighbor as well as to give a plant to the lady from the reception. We decided to meet at the flower store as Anat went to confirm our flight and Talia went to change some money. Anat came rushing to the florist we must go at once to the airport they dont have reservation for us on the flight to Warsaw. She then suggested that she should go alone to the airport and if she has time she would return to pack,r if not we should bring her things with us to the airport at about 1 oclock. . Talia and I returned to the hotel and decided to rest for an hour. Just before eleven Anat returned to find us resting in our beds. Did not they tell you ? she said Gari called an hour ago and he said that he will be here at 11 A.M. She continued We must go down and check out, all is well with our tickets to Warsaw We met Gari at the lobby of the hotel. The staff eagerly translated the details for us. As we knew our grandfather was the son of Zalman he had a brother Aharon ( who died in some war) and a brother Lova and a sister Named Berta. Gari said My grandmother was Frieda he talked non stop My father first family perished in the holocaust, he had a son and a daughter. Only my father survived and after the war he married my mother and had me and my younger brother Sacha who moved with his wife , her family and his young daughter to San Francisco, they live in China town. I married recently and my wife is an English teacher. Aharon was killed in the Second World War, he was a soldier in the Red Army. He had two sons I asked Where they named Boobi and Zili? ( There was a picture of two young boys in my fathers album from c 1930 which said in Russian ; To grandma from Booby and Zili) He said; Zili is living in Riga Kola or Nicolay might have been nick named Booby as a young child, he passed away a few years ago he looked the other pictures Anat had and recognized Irina who is the granddaughter of your grandfather sister; Rosa Was not his sister Berta? we asked. Yes, he had two sisters; one named Berta and the other; Rosa. One lived in Tallin and the other in Leningrad/ St. Petersburg. Irina and her family are living in Israel since the 1990s We wanted to call Irina on the cell phone at once. We first called Zili in Riga. Gari spoke Russian with him and told him who we were. He knew our parents who were his first cousins. My cousin and I spoke to him also but other then names we could not say much to him he did not speak English or Hebrew. Gari called Irina ( We later found out that her mother Zila ( born in St. Petersburg in 1922) also lives with her and she is the niece of our grandfather). They told Gari that they searched for our family in Israel. They found the grave of my grandfather in the Tel Aviv area and left notes for my cousin Anat and my aunt Zoozy. They had the wrong first name for my father and did not know Zoozies first name. How ironic it was! Zoozy tried so hard to find them but she had no address or names other then Lova Gordin from Riga. She passed away in 1994. We had Gari look at the site I created for the Gordin family and he recognized Zila in one picture and in another her son Misha. Information that we found from Irina since; Her grandmother; Rosa or Rachel nee Gordin was born in Riga in 1897. She left Riga at age 17 ( during World war 1) . She moved to St. Petesburg and married ? Zilberman. She had two daughters; Musia was born in 1921 and Zila in 1922. Zila married Mr. Zislin she had Irina in 1948 and Misha/ Michael in 1955. Irina ( a physician) married Mr. Rom and had a son: Boris in 1972. Recently Boris had a baby girl ( Shelly?). They live in Holon (other then Misha). Misha Zislin lives in Beer Sheva with son; Alex, born in 1976 and daughter Klara born in 1984. Musia Zilberman was a great person and very caring for the family. She is the one who found the grave of Solomon Gordin in Holon. She died about seven years ago. Kula gordin ( son of Aharon) had two sons; Erik and Sergei Gordin. They live in Riga. Berta, the other sister of our grandfather, lived in Tallin. She married Mr. Sank ( Sp?) her step children also came to Israel?
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- Saturday, September 03, 2005 at 15:13:49 (EDT)
From 1930 census; Abe Hyatt Baltimore, Baltimore (Independent City), MD born abt 1891 Latvia ( should be pasvalys, Lithuania) Head married at age 23 came to the country in 1911 ( Russian speaking- should say Yiddish) Lillian Hyatt Baltimore, Baltimore (Independent City), MD born abt 1894 Latvia Wife married at age 20 came to the country in 1910 ( Russian speaking) Silvan Hyatt Baltimore, Baltimore (Independent City), MD born abt 1915 son Leon Hyatt Baltimore, Baltimore (Independent City), MD abt 1919 Son Gladys Hyatt Baltimore, Baltimore (Independent City), MD abt 1922 Daughter They owned their home $5,000- was a proprietor they were the only white people in the neighborhood. http://content.ancestry.com/iexec/?htx=View&;r=an&dbid;=6224&iid;=MDT626_862-0902&desc;=Lillian+Hyatt&pid;=104841248
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USA - Friday, September 02, 2005 at 04:25:14 (EDT)
James > > Hello, > > I hope you don't mind me contacting you. I saw your website through > Cyndislist, and seeing the effort you have put into it, I wondered if my > site might be a useful resource for your sites visitors. > > http://www.bmd-certificates.co.uk > > We locate and obtain UK (England & Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) > birth, marriage or death certificates. > > If you can find the time to review my site and if you think it could be a > valuable resource, if you would consider linking to it, it would be greatly > appreciated. > > I'd like to thank you for taking the time to read this email and the effort > of considering my site. > > > Best regards, > > James Frank > james@bmd-certificates.co.uk > > > > BMD Certificates > 2nd Floor > 145-157 St John Street > London EC1V 4PY > United Kingdom
James Frank <james@bmd-certificates.co.uk>
- Thursday, September 01, 2005 at 20:43:01 (EDT)
Charles D. Gelfand (charlie5@flash.net) on Wednesday, August 31, 2005 at 19:42:21 --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: Comment Home Page: http:// Message: Hi, My mother was Rachel Ginzburg. She married my dad when she was but 14 years old, and they came to America in 1921. They came under a different name than their own names. My mother told me her name was Rachel Miller, not Ginzburg. She told me my dad was Julius Gelfand, but when he died, they told me the truth. His name was Julius Hymanson, but to come to America, they had to do it that way. I would love to know more about my family. I do know that my mom was born in Postov. and my brothr Robert was an infant when they came to the USA. She had some sisters, Mashke (Marsha) Freitka, Peshke, Grunne (Gertrude) who was in America before her and a brother Meyer, who emigrated to South Africa. Is there any way I could find out who my grandparents were?
Charles D. Gelfand <charlie5@flash.net>
- Thursday, September 01, 2005 at 18:38:45 (EDT)
Keith Gubitz (k_gubitz@yahoo.com) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Meyer Weinstein' picture; history.html+http://72.14.207.104/search?q=cache:-vfY2jEkEOUJ:www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/vilna/vilna_pages/vilna_Meyer+Weinstein&hl;=en Message: I really appreciate what you are doing here. Meyer Weinstine was my cousin and I remember my mother showing me an article when I was a child entitled the Town of Meyer Weinstine. Does anybody know what town this is? My fathers side of the family came from Minsk. My grandmother's maiden name was Oxenkrug. My mothers side came from what was Poland, a town called Colona. My grandfather was a Dublinsky and my grandmother was a Sirota, her mother was Baker/Becker. . Any information will be appreciated. Thank You. . My granmother was a Sirota, her mother was Baker/ Thanks again, Keith Gubitz 23852 Pacific Coast Highway #591 Malibu, CA 90265 Keith Gubitz
history.html+http://72.14.207.104/search?q=cache:-vfY2jEkEOUJ:www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/vilna/vilna_pages/vilna_Meyer+Weinstein&hl=en
USA - Tuesday, August 30, 2005 at 00:41:47 (EDT)
I found the address of our Kruger cousins in N.Y. in my mothers' note book The address is from 1954 so I dont think it is still relevant, yet who knows . A. Kruger , 1018-49 st. Brooklyn 19 NY USA
Naomi Levin
Israel - Friday, August 26, 2005 at 01:19:26 (EDT)
Dear Belarussiggers I am writing about this to ask if other siggers have noticed something like what I found and to suggest that others be on the lookout for it.... My ggfather Abraham BERGER (1838-1918) son of Yitskhok Levi lived in Haradok in the Vilna gubernia and died in New York . When I showed a friend a photo of his headstone she noticed somehting surprising. If the first letters each line of the inscription are read downward it spells out a message. There is Aleph Beys, for Av meaning father, Yud Tsadik Khes Kuf, spelling out the name Yitskhok. At the end are the letters Lamed Ayin which I interpret as a diminutive ending so that the whole message is "Av Yitskhokle". Does anyone know whether acrostics like this are common on headstones from Belarus and other parts of Europe? Regards Charles
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USA - Thursday, August 25, 2005 at 20:14:45 (EDT)
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New York USA, LA New York USA - Thursday, August 25, 2005 at 00:34:04 (EDT)
I have just finished reading Primo Levy's wonderful 1981 book, "If Not Now, When", a work of fiction based on real events, Jewish partisans in WW2. One ghetto mentioned in the book is Kossovo! I was amazed, as my husband works in Kossovo, the new state in the making which was part of the former Yugoslavia, so I tried the internet to find out about a town with this name somewhere in Russia, as the other places mentioned in the book are very real... I thank you for this interesting site and wish that such sites existed to commemorate other Jewish communities in Eastern Europe. Leah Shakdiel, Yeruham, Israel (moshelea@netvision.net.il) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Paty Fagin Pappas (patriciapappas1@verizon.net) on Sunday, August 14, 2005 Message: Found this link thanks to e mail from Yseplowitz (rabbi from Monsey NY) My mother is May Seplow Fagin. Her father was from Dunilowicz, Harry (Herschel) Seplow son of Scholomo and Ahuva Seplowitz. (aka Cepelowicz) We also have an entire branch of the family in Brazil as well as NYC. Great pictures! --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Joanne Brewda (joanne.brewda@fmr.com) on Tuesday, August 09, 2 Message: Responding to a note from Kira who was asking information about Leah Brewda who might be her great aunt. I read the posting and believe from the dates that Leah is my husband's grandmother, her husband Yosef is his grandfather, and that Zlata Brewda also listed is Leah's daughter and my husband's aunt. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- jean-pierre eckmann (eckmann@mkn.unige.ch) on Sunday, August 07, 2005 at 16:01:38 Subject: Question Message: I have been told there was a shop Ekman in TelAviv in the past. any details known? Who this ekmann was? (I myself seem to descend from Dolginov, but ancestors left it in early 1905-6 to switzzerland and second alia to palestine to answer, please replace mkn in address above by mykonos
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- Saturday, August 20, 2005 at 19:41:11 (EDT)
joanne.brewda@fmr.com (Joanne Brewda) Date: 09 Aug 2005, 12:42:16 PM Subject: WWW Form Submission Below is the result of your feedback form. It was submitted by Joanne Brewda (joanne.brewda@fmr.com) on Tuesday, August 09, 2005 at 12:42:16 --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: Comment Home Page: http:// Message: Responding to a note from Kira who was asking information about Leah Brewda who might be her great aunt. I read the posting and believe from the dates that Leah is my husband's grandmother, her husband Yosef is his grandfather, and that Zlata Brewda also listed is Leah's daughter and my husband's aunt.w
1
USA - Friday, August 12, 2005 at 06:26:27 (EDT)
I am researching Hoberman from Gleboyoke. Anyone out there? Cliff Hoberman San Marcos, Ca.
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USA - Friday, August 05, 2005 at 13:35:27 (EDT)
doryce seltzer (dorysel@optonline.net) on Thursday, July 28, 2005 at 11:48:57 --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: Comment Home Page: http:// Message: My grandfather, David Penn , born 3/10/1893, told me that he was born in Glubokye in Russia. His father Harold Pen, a peddler, died of TB at the age of 37 when David was 6.His mother Hoda Pen and his sister moved to her sister's home in Smargon. In 1911 they left for Hamburg Germany where they boarded the ship "General Grant" and arrived in NY on 6/2/1911. Are there any birht records,photos or written archives that may include my grandfather's family? Pls advise.
doryce seltzer <dorysel@optonline.net>
- Saturday, July 30, 2005 at 03:12:38 (EDT)
Phyllis (themishpukah@aol.com) on Friday, July 29, 2005 at 08:18:53 --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: Comment Home Page: http://hometown.aol.com/themishpukah/page2.html Message: Your site is wonderful - It was terrific to see ref's to my grandfather (Sam Epstein) Phyllis
http://hometown.aol.com/themishpukah/page2.html
USA - Saturday, July 30, 2005 at 03:08:58 (EDT)
From: SinaCKunz04@hotmail.com (SInalei Kunz) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Thank you so much for the wonderful website! Even though I did not fin much on my roots, it was still very interesting to read the many stories and look at all the pictures. It's amazing! My jewish branch on my family tree is a mystery. I know that my Great, Great Grandfather, Ben Maximillian Greenburg was born 19 APR 1875 in Paseval, Kaunas, Lithuania or Poswal, Kovp, USSR. I'm thinking it's the same place. He eventually migrated to South Africa and some of his desendants have made the migration to America. I have been told by my Oupa that Ben Maximillian was a rabbi and the son of a rabbi. From what I have gathered so far Ben's Father is Alexander Susman Greenberg who married Anne Gittel Schulman. The last name has also been sugested to me by relatives to be Von Groeneberg and Grinberg. If by chance you pass by some info about my ancestors, please email me! Thank you so much and kudos on your web page! Thank you, Sinalei Kunz
SInalei Kunz
- Tuesday, July 26, 2005 at 18:50:03 (EDT)
Below is the result of your feedback form. It was submitted by Altman Miri (miri@gitam.co.il) on Sunday, July 24, 2005 at 15:17:39 --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: Question Home Page: http:// Message: Please, I am looking for my Grandfather's family: Spicas Zundely, born in Seda, Lithuania, around 1913-1914, Came to Palestine from Kovno in 1932. Please help me, His parents name were: Alta and Shalom. He had 2 sisters, Zipora and Lea. Thank you in advanced, Miri Altman.
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- Monday, July 25, 2005 at 16:59:04 (EDT)
I am reading your interesting website about kurenets & its region around & I appreciate the great work you did & probably are still doing. 1) I am the daughter of Yente Dinerstein from Kurenets, who lives in Israel together with her sister Rachel Dinerstein (we recently spoke about a chapter from her manuscript, that was translated to English & appears on the Internet). I was once in contact with Steven Rosen, as he started a list of Dinersteins & once we were even receiving copies of those e-mails through my daughter's e-mail address in the Technion where she studied. I would like to have again this contact & will appreciate to get those e-mails again & if possible also the e- mail address of Steven. 2) It is difficult to enter your website, is there any change ? 3) I found in your website about Kurenets some mistakes : in the directory of business, there was not mentioned the business of my grandmother Sarah Dinerstein, who had a shop in the center of the market in Kurenets. Also, my grandfather Yehuda Leib Dinerstein was an agent of Singer sewing machines & it was also not mentioned. 4) There are other details that are not mentioned in a few places in your website & I will be glad to send corrections from time to time, after I get instructions from my mother. 5) I did not find any information about the Dinerstein family although it is written in the list at the beginning. I saw that you arranged a sub-site for every family but not for the Dinersteins. Awaiting your reply & best regards from Israel Sarah Formanovsky UNQUOTE 4 ) Hope you will have the opportunity to reply. I know that you are very busy. I had other interesing projects about which I wanted to speak with you, but have to let you breath a little, isn't it ? Best regards, Sarah, Israel daughter of Yente (nee Dinerstein from Kurenets) & Abraham Baranovitch from Horodok
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- Wednesday, July 20, 2005 at 18:32:36 (EDT)
Shalom from Poland
Eilat <eilat.gordinlevitan@gmail.com>
- Friday, July 15, 2005 at 15:11:37 (EDT)
I will be in Israel from July 16th for about a month. Phone # 085457837. Eilat Gordin Levitan
Eilat Gordin Levitan
- Thursday, July 14, 2005 at 13:11:29 (EDT)
I prepared the analysis at http://www.pikholz.org/Rosenbloom/EBR.html for my own family, but since there are several Borisov/ Dolginovo families mentioned ( Gordon, Kugel) I thought I'd bring it to the group's attention. Israel Pickholtz
www.pikholz.org/Rosenbloom/EBR.html
- Tuesday, July 12, 2005 at 20:44:05 (EDT)
Sarah (sarasky@actcom.net.il) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/horodok/horodok.html Message: Dear Eilat, July 9, 2005 Imagine yourself how happy I am, looking at your tremendous work you have done. I just found you have arranged the HORODOK website as well. My father Avraham Baranovitch was born in Horodok in 1913, married & leaved in Ivenitz (is it the shtetl that you called Ivie ?), had 2 children. His first wife, 2 children, as well as brothers, sister & parents - all killed. I have stories that I am gathering these days, as well as pictures. About picture # 6 on the HORODOK home page, may I contact the people who had sent it to the website ? I also have other pictures that I'd like to scan into the web & am going to update the registry of my father's family who perished in the Holocaust. BTW, I am the daughter of Yente Dinerstein-Rudnitsky-Baranovitch from Kurenets & on that matter I'm also going to add much information as well as pictures.
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/horodok/horodok.html
- Saturday, July 09, 2005 at 17:58:15 (EDT)
Wanda Dow (s.v.dow@btinternet.com) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Message: Hi I was wondering if anyone has any records of the pupils who went to the local school in Kosowo? I am trying to tace my grandfather's family his name was Stanislaw Pilat and his date of birth was 18/12/1911 and his birth was registerd in Kosowo county Kolbuszowa . My grandfather's father name was Jan Pilat and his mother was Honorata Pilat nee Kaczor. I would gately appreciate any information anyone could give me please
Wanda Dow
- Saturday, July 09, 2005 at 17:55:04 (EDT)
Laurie Sadetsky (behrmanwax@aol.com) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: Question Home Page: http:// Message: In Archives part 2 I noticed a reply to "Debby" about the Graffman family. There was a list of many Graffmans from all over. I was wondering if you just listed everyone you found or if you know of a relationship. My husband's grandmother was Sonia Graffman, sister of Dina, Joseph who married Lillian, and Vladimir who married Nadine. They were famous musicians and lived in NYC. They did not live in Maine or Illinois. I do not know who to contact about the info I found. Can anyone help?
Laurie Sadetsky
- Saturday, July 09, 2005 at 17:52:40 (EDT)
Alexander Beider wrote.... I'm a linguist and I'm preparing the second eidtion of my book "A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from the Russian Empire" (http://www.avotaynu.com/beider.htm). ............................................. Currently I'm working on Grodno guberniya. Contrary to several other provinces (Courland, Kovno, Vilna, Minsk) for which Jewish genealogists collected extensive extracts from various Russian documents (civil records, taxation and revision lists) and shared them with me, for Grodno guberniua I was able to find comprehensive lists only for civil records from Bialystok and the Brest ghetto. As a result, I'm trying to find other possible sources. The most important source I found is the Yad Vashem searchable database but unfortunately for Grodno guberniya almost all testimony pages were originally compiled in Hebrew during the 1950s and therefore from these pages it's often impossible to tell how the surname was pronounced. Today, I came across a very unusual name from Kobrin/Kobryn spelled Berwikunkin in the Yad Vashem database. As it could also be Barevikonkin, Brevikunekin etc. I made a search through Internet and found your Web page http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/krivichi/kriv_pages/kriv_gb_archive.html where Berwikunkin is mentioned among other passengers who came from Kobryn to Ellis Island .......................... I thought that the Ellis Island Web searchable database allows to extract names of all Jewish passengers from a single town but it appears that the field "Last Name" is mandatory even in the Advanced Search (at least three initial characters should be entered to start a search on http://www.ellisisland.org/search/search_new.asp? Sincerely, Alexander Beider ---------------------------------------- I wrote Alexander about the site which I used to search the Ellis Island data, by using only the name of town - - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/eidb/ellisjw.html --------------------- Eilat, Thank you very much for these names and especially for the indication of the existence of the site http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/eidb/ellisjw.html I was unaware about its existence and it will certainly be very useful for my work on Grodno and other guberniyas. Thanks again, Alexander
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- Monday, June 20, 2005 at 01:54:57 (EDT)
I will be on the road this summer in Israel [July 29 - August 15]. During part of this time, I will be available to individuals for consultation about the LitvakSIG Vital Records Indexing Project and the Vilna Research District Group activities. If there are groups in Israel wishing to host a presentation of the LitvakSIG Vital Records Indexing Project or the Vilna District records, please contact me at Joelrat1@hotmail.com. Joel Ratner Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group
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- Friday, June 17, 2005 at 14:20:47 (EDT)
I am a member of several genealogy clubs here in the U.S. and am researching my roots in Jerusalem when it was under Turkish domination. I have no idea how to go about researching in Israel. Any help or guidance you can give me, or a researcher you can suggest, will be very much appreciated. My family names are: Iakob Mordahay COHEN (perhaps a Rabbi or whose father was a Rabbi). Shrage Feivel Schlomo SCHNITZER b. abt. 1829 in Ashmiana, Lithuania (Oshmany?) .(Perhaps he was a Rabbi. His wife's name may have been Rivka Lehudith. His daughter, my great grandmother was named Rachel or Rebecca or Clara or Rivka.) According to Rabbi Gorr, his children were: Monish Berl b. 1850 Sheinale Esther b. 1852 Chaja b. 1858 Hinda b. 1860 Rivka, Rachel, Rebecca or Clara b. 1862 Wolf b. 1864 Again, many thanks. Muriel Schloss Las Vegas, NV, USA, UCLAMEma@cox.net
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- Tuesday, June 14, 2005 at 18:05:49 (EDT)
Dear Julie, Thank you for writing. I found reports by your relative Shlomo ( must be named for his grandfather Shlomo Sklut/ Sklud) from the reports it seem that his mother was Feiga - Zipora and she was the daughter of Sara and Shlomo Sklut. Sara perished in the holocaust so some of your information and Shlomos' information do not match. Szuster Cypora Cypora Szuster was born in Wolozyn, Poland in 1902 to Shlomo and Sara Sklut. She was a housewife and married to Yaakov. Prior to WWII she lived in Wolozyn, Poland. During the war was in Wolozyn, Poland. Cypora died in 1942 in Wolozyn, Poland with children: Shimon age 13, Ytza age 9 and Mordechai age 6.. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 17/06/1957 by her son Shlomo Szuster in Bnai Brak another report for his mother; Feiga Schuster was born in Valozhyn, Poland. She was married. Prior to WWII she lived in Valozhyn, Poland. During the war was in Valozhyn, Poland. Feiga died in Auschwitz. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 05/12/1956 by her son Ita Schuster was born in Waloschy, Poland in 1914 to Yaakov and Feiga. She was single. Prior to WWII she lived in Waloschy, Poland. During the war was in Waloschy, Poland. Ita died in Auschwitz. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 05/12/1956 by her brother Shlomo Schuster Schimon Schimon Schuster was born to Yaakov and Feiga. He was single. Prior to WWII he lived in Woloszynka, Poland. During the war was in Woloszynka, Poland. Schimon died in Auschwitz. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 05/12/1956 by his brother Shlomo Chanan Sklud was born in Wolozyn, Poland in 1895 to Shlomo and Sara. He was a worker and married and had one son who also perished. Prior to WWII he lived in Wolozyn, Poland. During the war was in Wolozyn, Poland. Chanan died in 1942 in Wolozyn, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 17/06/1957 by his relative. More Details... Sklud Herszel Herszel Sklud was born in Wolozyn, Poland in 1892 to Shlomo and H. He was a merchant and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Wolozyn, Poland. During the war was in Wolozyn, Poland. Herszel died in 1942 in Wolozyn, Poland with his four children. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 17/06/1957 by his relative. More Details... Sklud Lewi Lewi Sklud was born in Wolozyn, Poland in 1895 to Shlomo and Sara. He was a merchant and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Wolozyn, Poland. During the war was in Wolozyn, Poland. Lewi died in 1942 in Wolozyn, Poland with sons Ytza and Zelik. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 17/06/1957 by his relative. More Details... Sklud Zelig Zelig Sklud was born in Wolozyn, Poland in 1922 to Levi. He was a pupil and single. Prior to WWII he lived in Wolozyn, Poland. During the war was in Wolozyn, Poland. Zelig died in 1942 in Wolozyn, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 17/06/1957 by his relative. Sklud Sara Sara Sklud was born in Wolozyn, Poland in 1870. She was a housewife and a widow of Shlomo. Prior to WWII she lived in Wolozyn, Poland. During the war was in Wolozyn, Poland. Sara died in 1942 in Wolozyn, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 17/06/1957 by her grandson. Jakob Schuster was born in Waloschy, Poland. He was married. Prior to WWII he lived in Waloschy, Poland. During the war was in Waloschy, Poland. Jakob died in Auschwitz. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 05/12/1956 by his son.
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- Saturday, June 11, 2005 at 20:04:56 (EDT)
I just wanted to visit your page again and update my information. I am a Sklut trying to find other Skluts. My grandfather, Aisik Sklut, was born in 1894 in Volozhin, Byelorussia. His mother's name was Sarah and I think his father's name was Samuel but I'm not positive. His father married again after Sarah died and they had a daughter. His daughter's name started with a "B". Her son lives in Israel and is named Shlomo Schuster. I tried writing him but I don't think he reads English, although I was told that his wife did. Maybe they never got my letter. I'd like to find out how Skluts are related to the other Skluts I've corresponded with in North Carolina, Delaware, and elsewhere. I don't think my grandfather had any other surviving siblings besides his half-sister. My grandfather died in 1955, so he didn't tell much of his history to my Bubby. My Bubby passed away in 1988, when I was 16 and didn't know to ask these questions because I wasn't yet interested ! in my heritage. Anyone with information is welcome to email me at mizzzjulie@gmail.com. Please put "geneology" in the subject line so I don't delete the message. Thank you!
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- Saturday, June 11, 2005 at 19:23:03 (EDT)
I just called Helen nee Levinstein in Los Angeles. She told me about the day they escaped from Kovno on June of 1941. She was with her sister Fania who was about 14 years old and her brother Leon who was 11. As soon as the war started she knew that they must escape east into the Soviet Union. Somehow they lost their parents in the train station of Kovno which was very crowded with Soviet families as well as others who wanted to flee. Some trains were filled with Soviet families and they did not let others go. Some how the sister and brother went on one train going east and Helen hung to the outside door until someone let her in. They told her to hold a child and act like she is a Soviet citizen. The trip east lasted many weeks. When they were in a station near Moscow her brother Leon went to look for bread. A soviet policeman took him and brought him to a home near by. Somehow the child met a Russian ( non Jewish) woman who came from Leningrad. The woman was very educated and she took him under her wings. He received the best education and had a degree in Literature. Helen survived and her sister Fania died of Typhus in 1944. After the war ended Helen came to the U.S. In October of 1974 someone knocked on the door of Helens' sister home in Israel. It was a prof. who came for a visit from Moscow to Israel. He told her that he was sent by her brother Leon. How did he find her?- Leon asked him to look for his sister Dina Levinshjtein who came to Israel before the war. The Prof. went to the Sochnut in Israel with the information and they were able to trace her. Since it was very difficult for Soviet citizens to travel abroad the two sisters visited their brother and his two sons in the Soviet Union. Seven years ago Leon came to Los Angeles. On May 13th Leon Levinstein passed away in Los Angeles at age 75.
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- Friday, June 10, 2005 at 16:00:50 (EDT)
Dear Eilat First I would like thank you for the wonderfully interesting conversation we had about the Jewish life in Lithuania and Latvia. As I told you, my mother Dina nee Levinshtein was born in Kaunas in 1914 to her father Abe (who was born in Usventis in 1889) and to her mother Ethel Hinde Sragon (who was born in Kaunas in 1890). My mother was always very proud that she lived in the center of Kaunas in Laisves Alia street # 30 (most of the Jewish people lived in Slabotka which was a poorer neighborhood) my grandfather Abe was an a upholsterer. He had a shop also on Laisves Aleia Street near to the Gediminas monoment. my mothers' family lived in Babati before moving to Kaunas and before that in Keidan according the documents I have, they lived in Keidan since 1732. My mother moved to Palestine in year 1936 to join other members of her Levinshtein family who came to Givataim in the 1920s. She came under fictional marriage to Mr Kaufman. Visas to Eretz Israel were very hard to obtain. According to the British law married couples could get an immigration visa easier. My mother Dina had 5 siblings; David was killed in the war as a soldier in the Red Army. A report by my mother to Yad Vashem; Levinstein David David Levinstein was born in Kovno, Lithuania in 1920 to Abe and Etl nee Sragon. Prior to WWII he lived in Kowno, Lithuania. During the war was in the Red Army, Ussr. David died in 1941 in Russia at the age of 21. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his sister. Zipora died from typhus 2 days before the war ended here is a report to Yad Vashem: Levinstein Fania Fania Levinstein was born in Kovno, Lithuania in 1927 to Abe and Etl Sragon. She was a child. Prior to WWII she lived in Kowno, Lithuania. During the war was in Ussr. Fania died in 1944 in Uzbekistan at the age of 17. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her sister Here is her story; She ran away from the German with Hellen- Devora and Leon the day the war started. The train in Kovno going east was so crowded that they hung to the door until the next stop. On the long ride they lost 11 years old Leon who missed the train while stepping of during a stop. The rest arrive to Tashkent. Helen lives today in Los Angeles. Leon survived and lived in the Soviet Union. He was found many years later. He is living today also in Los Angeles. I am attaching 3 pictures my mother Dina in Kaunas when she was about 15 years and 2 more pictures in the uniform of HaShomer Hatzair best regard Avi Lishower Other Yad Vashem reports by Avis mother: Levinshtein Abe Abe Levinshtein was born in Kowno, Lithuania in 1890 to David and Dina. He was married to Etl. Prior to WWII he lived in Kowno, Lithuania. During the war was in Kowno, Lithuania. Abe died in Mariampol, Lithuania at the age of 51. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his daughter.. Levinstein Etl Etl Levinstein nee Sragon was born in Kaunas, Lithuania in 1890 to Mordekhai and Miriam Gitl. She was married to Abe. Prior to WWII she lived in Kowno, Lithuania. During the war was in Kowno, Lithuania. Etl died in 1941 in Mariampol, Lithuania at the age of 51. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her daughter.
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- Friday, June 10, 2005 at 13:34:01 (EDT)
I just watched the 10-minute 1938 mini-travelogue on Vilna available on VHS from the Brandeis Jewish Library of Film and it was fascinating.  There are shots of the city's beautiful natural setting; its wide main thoroughfares; and the narrow streets in the old Jewish quarter; religiously garbed men walking by snappy moderrn dressers and overall a lovely, sad slice of life.  The narrator makes fun at one point of the Vilna accent and it brought back my late mother's talking about certain words being different in Vilna, like "tsoolent" (or something cloe to that) for "cholent."  I have a photo of my mother, brother and grandmother taken by a street photographer in the late 30s and in a way, this film brings that photo to life.  It's touching and a bit freaky.  These are my first reactions.  I intend to watch it again more carefully.  For those who don't know, there is a project underway of a documentary of cultural life in Vilna before the warm, under the aegis of The Vilna Project in New York--I just learned about this recently. -- Lev Raphael (http://www.levraphael.com) --------------------------- My name is Mira Jedwabnik Van Doren and I and my family are originally from Vilna.  I was born there in 1929 and left with my parents ten years later on August 22, 1939.  I now live in New York City and am currently producing a documentary film about the Jewish community of Vilna before its destruction in World War II. Anyone interested in finding out more about the film on Vilna can contact The Vilna Project at 130 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019, email vilnafilm@aol.com.
http://www.levraphael.com
- Friday, June 10, 2005 at 11:41:58 (EDT)
John Cornet asked about Telz/Telsiai in Lithuania http://shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/telz/telz.html Telz (Telsiai) from Jewishgen ----------------------- Written by Yosef Rosin -------------------------- English edited by Sarah and Mordechai Kopfstein -------------------------- Telz, one of the oldest towns in Lithuania, is situated in the north-western part of Lithuania - the Zemaitija region - on the shores of Lake Mastis, and was already mentioned in the chronicles of a Crusader Order in 1320. During the second half of the 15th century a royal estate was established in this place and merchants and artisans began to settle around it. The growing settlement suffered badly during the Swedish invasion in 1710, and two thirds of its population perished from epidemics at this time. In the middle of the 18th century a court was established in Telz, contributing to the development and growth of the town. Telz was granted the Magdeburg rights of self rule by King Stanislaw-August in 1791. Until 1795 Telz was part of the Polish-Lithuanian Kingdom, when the third division of Poland by the three superpowers of those times - Russia, Prussia and Austria - caused Lithuania to become partly Russian and partly Prussian. The part of Lithuania which included Telz fell under Czarist Russian rule, first from 1802 as part of the Vilna province (Gubernia) as a district center and from 1843 as part of the Kovno province. The Main Street picture(about 1916) In 1812 Napoleon's retreating army passed through Telz, leaving behind desolation as well as a big gun, which can still be seen in the town park. The town was damaged during the Polish rebellions of 1831 and 1863. In 1907 a fire lasting two days caused much damage, when the center of the town was burnt down. After some time the town was rebuilt, but brick houses were erected instead of the old wooden houses. During WW1 Telz was occupied by the German army who ruled there from 1915 till 1918, after which the Bolsheviks ruled for a short period. Until 1931 Telz was the district center without the rights of a town, and only then was a municipality elected. The Telz district included the towns of Seda, Zidikai, Skaudvile, Salantai, Kretinga, Plunge, Varniai, Gargzdai. At the beginning of the thirties a railway was constructed which connected Telz to the port of Klaipeda as well as to the Lithuanian railway network. This was a dominant factor in the economic development of the town. Jewish Settlement till after World War 1. Apparently Jews settled in Telz at the beginning of the 17th century. At the time, during which the "Va'ad Medinath Lita" (1623-1764) was established, the Telz community was a subject of the "Kahal" of the Keidan district. According to the order of the Russian Senate of the 1st of January 1800, a municipal council was established in Telz, which included three Jewish delegates. In 1804 the Jews were removed from the municipality at the request of the Christian delegates. 2,500 people lived in Telz in 1797, of them 1,650 were Jews (66%). Telz Jews also suffered from "Blood Libels", one in 1758, the second in 1827. In both cases the so called "accused" were released by the court, but as a result the Jewish population passed through a period of fear. There was also plotting by estate owners who saw the Jews as competitors in producing and selling alcohol, and in 1825 the nobles asked the Tsar to expel the Jews because they "spread diseases" and threaten to "rob and to steal". During the Polish rebellion of 1831 Telz Jews suffered both from the rebels and from the Cossacks. A Jew called Monish (Menashe) Lukniker was accused of helping the rebels and was hanged by the Russian rulers. When the authorities in Telz started to arm the population and to enlist men to fight the rebels, local Jews suggested to the authorities that they should not conscript Jews into the army, as they had no arms and also did not know how to use them. Instead they offered to supply the army with the necessary materials, such as steel, leather, gunpowder etc. to which the authorities agreed, and a document was signed to this effect. Telz was not spared the years of famine 1869/72. A help committee for Telz Jews, established on behalf of the Gubernator, included the following: Dr. Mapu, Yehudah-Leib Gordon, the merchants Leib Kantsel (Gordon's father in law), and Berman. Later on Izik Rabinovitz and wife, Idel Gordon, Meir Atlas, Yehoshua-Heshl Margalioth, Yitskhak Elyashev, Khayim Rabinovitz and his son in law Broide, Rabbiner Khazanovitz, Yeshaya Bai, Shabtai Raseinsky, Aharon Neimark, Gershon Meirovitz were also active. In the Hebrew newspaper "HaMagid" of the years 1872 and 1874, there are lists of Telz Jews who donated money for hunger victims in other Lithuanian towns. In 1870 Telz had 6,481 residents, including 4,399 Jews (68%), and in 1897 there were 6,000 residents and of them 3,088 were Jews (51%). During the persecutions and pogroms against Jews in the eighties of the 19th century in Ukraine and other places, the self confidence of Telz Jews was damaged, as a result of which and also because of conscription into the army for six years, many young Jewish men left Telz and immigrated to America, Argentina and South Africa. This wave of immigration lasted till WW1, and during the years 1870-1923 the Jewish population of Telz decreased by 2854 people. The cholera epidemic of 1893 took many victims, especially among poor Jews, who lived in overcrowded and bad hygienic conditions. The local rabbi, Eliezer Gordon, initiated the establishment of a committee which collected money from the rich in order to supply the sick with medicines, disinfectants and medical help. Around this time the Telz Jewish hospital was established. The local Jews made their living from commerce, crafts and peddling. In 1841 there were 25 Jewish artisans: 14 tailors, 10 shoemakers and one watchmaker, not counting wandering artisans. Until WW1 there was a strong organization of Jewish artisans, which helped its members with loans for buying raw materials and tools. Among the Jewish merchants there were several who had big businesses of grains and flax and made a good living. There were also several textile merchants who imported merchandise from Germany, one of them being Ya'akov Rabinovitz. "The Great Yeshivah" was a source of income of many families, who supplied living quarters and food for hundreds of its students. Many families maintained small farms beside their houses as additional income. In the eighties many Jewish families earned their living while residing in the surrounding villages. The economic situation of most Telz Jews - the small shop owners, the artisans, the peddlers, the coachmen and the carriers - was hard. There were also poor people who subsisted on welfare support and some who collected alms by going from house to house. Telz had four synagogues (Beth-Midrash): the "great", of the tailors, of the butchers and of the soldiers, where Jewish soldiers would swear the oath of allegiance to the Tsar. The great "Beth Midrash" in particular was impressive because of its dimensions, having beside it a large backyard, the "Shulhoif", where the "Chupah" of wedding couples would be arranged, as well as lamentations during funerals. In addition to prayers, these synagogues were the centers of activities for various societies dealing with "Torah" studies, such as "Talmud", Mishnah", 'Ein Ya'akov" etc. The Telz "Yeshivah", which had been established in 1880 by three young men (Avreikhim)-Yitskhak Ya'akov Openheim, Meir Atlas, Zalman Abel- with the help of a German Jew - Ovadyah Lakhman from Berlin - developed and prospered, and after Rabbi Eliezer Gordon was nominated as its head in 1884, it became the main institution of orthodox education. At the end of 19th century it had about 400 students and was counted as one of the greatest in the world. Next to it there was a preparatory class (Yeshivah Ketanah) for boys aged 10-16. .....( for the rest go to http://shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/telz/telz.html )--------- I checked the name Witz in Yad vashem reports and found none in Telz, Lithuania but many in Kalish ( Poland) I am pasting here some Witz sounding like names as well as maiden names from Lithuania ( for more information go to the Yad Vashem site) Wiz Bracha KOWNA KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Wiz Riwa KOWNA KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Witz Yisrael SIAULIAI SIAULIAI LITHUANIA 1921 Page of Testimony Weitz Chaim Page of Testimony Bernstein Chava JURBURG RASEINIAI LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Wasc Khaim KIBARTI VILKAVISKIS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Weitz Avraham KIBARTI VILKAVISKIS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Wajc Khava KIBARTI VILKAVISKIS LITHUANIA 1907 Page of Testimony Waiz Badana ZARASAI EZERENAI - ZARASAI LITHUANIA 1908 Page of Testimony Wajc Rakhel KIBARTI VILKAVISKIS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Misrochs Hanna LIBAWA LIEPAJAS KURZEME LATVIA 1890 Page of Testimony Wajc Yehudit KIBARTI VILKAVISKIS LITHUANIA 1918 Page of Testimony Wajc Bela KIBARTI VILKAVISKIS LITHUANIA 1910 Page of Testimony Vitz Yisrael SAVL SIAULIAI LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Vitz Rivka SAVLI SIAULIAI LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Place of Residence Name Town District Region Country Birth Date Source Riveshtein Rakhel VENDZIOGALA KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Witz Dvora VENDZIOGALA KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Witz Lea VENDZIOGALA KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Witz Peretz KAUNAS KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Witz Brakha KAUNAS KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Don Dvora KAUNAS KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Witz David KAUNAS KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Witz Tzila KAUNAS KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Witz Meir KAUNAS KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Witz Hene KAUNAS KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Witz Beniamin KAUNAS KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Witz Gershon VENDZIOGALA KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Witz Batia KAUNAS KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Witz Shalom VENDZIOGALA KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Witz Bela VENDZIOGALA Witz Berl KAUNAS KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Witz Yaakov KAUNAS KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Alperovitz* Rivka KOVNO KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Wejc Eliahu POLAND Page of Testimony Shragovitz Malka KAUNAS KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony Shalitan Zlata KAUNAS KAUNAS LITHUANIA Page of Testimony http://www.yadvashem.org
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- Tuesday, June 07, 2005 at 19:23:20 (EDT)
Shalom, Your website is incredible! It is a wonderful wealth of information about our peoples ancestry. I am very impressed, and appreciative of the efforts contained therein. Some of my ancestors are from Telz/Telsiai in Lithuania in the mid-nineteenth century. Might you have come across the surname Witz, and if so, could you please point me in the direction of where to find additional information about daily life there at this time and their heritage? Thank you. John Cornet (JohnCornet@Charter.Net) Oregon, United States
John Cornet <JohnCornet@Charter.Net>
- Tuesday, June 07, 2005 at 18:42:10 (EDT)
Researchers Say Intelligence and Diseases May Be Linked in Ashkenazic Genes By NICHOLAS WADE ---- Published: June 3, 2005==http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/03/science/03gene.html ///A team of scientists at the University of Utah has proposed that the unusual pattern of genetic diseases seen among Jews of central or northern European origin, or Ashkenazim, is the result of natural selection for enhanced intellectual ability. The selective force was the restriction of Ashkenazim in medieval Europe to occupations that required more than usual mental agility, the researchers say in a paper that has been accepted by the Journal of Biosocial Science, published by Cambridge University Press in England. The hypothesis advanced by the Utah researchers has drawn a mixed reaction among scientists, some of whom dismissed it as extremely implausible, while others said they had made an interesting case, although one liable to raise many hackles. "It would be hard to overstate how politically incorrect this paper is," said Steven Pinker, a cognitive scientist at Harvard, noting that it argues for an inherited difference in intelligence between groups. Still, he said, "it's certainly a thorough and well-argued paper, not one that can easily be dismissed outright." "Absolutely anything in human biology that is interesting is going to be controversial," said one of the report's authors, Dr. Henry Harpending, an anthropologist and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He and two colleagues at the University of Utah, Gregory Cochran and Jason Hardy, see the pattern of genetic disease among the Ashkenazi Jewish population as reminiscent of blood disorders like sickle cell anemia that occur in populations exposed to malaria, a disease that is only 5,000 years old. In both cases, the Utah researchers argue, evolution has had to counter a sudden threat by favoring any mutation that protected against it, whatever the side effects. Ashkenazic diseases like Tay-Sachs, they say, are a side effect of genes that promote intelligence. The explanation that the Ashkenazic disease genes must have some hidden value has long been accepted by other researchers, but no one could find a convincing infectious disease or other threat to which the Ashkenazic genetic ailments might confer protection. A second suggestion, wrote Dr. Jared Diamond of the University of California, Los Angeles, in a 1994 article, "is selection in Jews for the intelligence putatively required to survive recurrent persecution, and also to make a living by commerce, because Jews were barred from the agricultural jobs available to the non-Jewish population." for the rest go to 2005==http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/03/science/03gene.html
2005==http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/03/science/03gene.html
- Sunday, June 05, 2005 at 03:30:39 (EDT)
Dear Eilat, --- I have recently begun research into my family tree.  I found your web site which has been a wonderful wealth of information.   Here is what I know thus far:   My great-grandfather:  Abraham Pressman came over in 1904.  According the ellis Island manifest his last place of residence is listed as Vilna. His wife Eshka (listed as Hesse on the manifest; later American records list her as Anna) came over in 1906 with their daughter, Liebe (later: my great Aunt Lily).   I have since found out: Eshkas maiden name was Zimmerman or Tsimerman   Also, after getting Abrahams death certificate from the state of New York, I now know HIS parents (my great, great grandparents) were: David Pressman and Sarah Pressman (nee Katzowitz).  I assume Sarah is americanized, so I am not sure what her yiddish name was. I did find a David Pressman on the 1850 Revision list, but it seems unlikely as that David was missing since 1846 and was age 42 in the last revision.  Abraham would have been born around 1873, so that David is not likely his father.   I have seen many referencs to these family names on your web site but have hit a wall.  I dont know the names of any of Abraham or Eshkas siblings (though the family lore is that they came from very, very large families).    Although they were listed as Vilna on the Elis Island manifests, it seems that perhaps they were not from the town of Vilna, but perhaps the Gubernia.   I have found quite a lot of Pressmans in Dolginovo, Tsimermans in Kurenets, and Katzowitzs in Krivichi.  Though I have no way to know if these are my direct ancestors.   Any information or suggestions you have for me would be greatly appreciated -------------- Dear Robin, In the 1920 census I found-;--- Name:   Abe Pressman Age:   ;45 years  Estimated birth year:   abt 1875 Birthplace:   Russia Race:   White Home in 1920:   rented in Manhattan, New York, New York worked or owned a vegetable store Wife Anna; age 37 came from Russia in 1906 daughter; Libbie age 15 came from Russia in 1906 son; Sam age 13 born in New York son; David age 8 Born in New York daughter; Dorothy age 2 and six months born in New York It seems that Zimerman Cila age 21? born in Russia came in 1911 lived with them she was an operator ----------------------- Eilat, Thanks so much for the rapid response.  Both are the same family and are mine. Abraham was born about 1873 and Eshka/Anna in 1883.  Abraham came over in 1904 and Eshka and Lily in 1906. My great aunt Lily (liebe) was born in Russia and came over.  My grandfather (name on birth certificate is Harry Joseph, but he was called Samuel.  At some point that became Jerry we always knew him as Jerry), my great uncle David and great aunt Dorothy.   We are close to this part of the family and I grew up knowing my grandfathers siblings and their children.   They originally lived in lower Manhattan.  They saved their money working (or possibly owning) a grocery and then bought an apartment building in the Bronx.  They were landlords and eventually became more involved in real estate. From your email though I now have some names of my great grandparents siblings.  I do remember someone called tante chaika , but no one alive knows if this was Abrahams sister or Eshkas.  That must be sister Ida you mention in the first email.  So, I am guessing she was a Pressman.  Also, Zimmerman sister, Cila is new information to me.   These names may help as I try to track back to Russia and figure out the family lines.  --------------------- Database: 1930 United States Federal Census BRONX BOROUGH, ASSEMBLY DIST. 5 (PART), BOUNDED BY (N) FREEMAN; (E) INTERVALE AVE.; (S) E. 169TH; (W) LYMAN PL. They lived on 1284 St-ff----? Ave--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Name Family Members Home in 1930(City,County,State) Estimated Birth Year Birthplace Relation ------------------------------------------------------------renter from them Ap 321 $33; *Pauline Greenberg Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1864 Russia Head *Nathan Lerner Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1910 New York Grandson *Annie Lerner Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1914 Grandson renter from them Ap. 322 $45; *Sol Lipson Bronx, NY abt 1893 New York Head *Sarah Lipson Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1901 Wife *Abraham Lipson,Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1923 Son owner $52,000 Ap. 323; *Abraham Pressman Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1875 Russia Head retire *Anna Pressman Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1883 Wife *David Pressman,Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1913 Son clerk in a dairy store*Dorothy Pressman, Bronx, NY abt 1918 Daughter *Harry Weinberg Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1897 Russia Brother-in-law clerk in a store.*Ida Weinberg Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1899 Sister   renter from them ap. 324 $39; *Ben Baievsky Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1894 Russia Head *Bessie Baievsky Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1896 Wife *Julius Baievsky Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1918 Son *Gabriel Baievsky Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1923 Son -----------------------------------------------------------
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- Saturday, June 04, 2005 at 13:31:17 (EDT)



From:  mbunimov@yahoo.com (Mariana Bunimov) Home Page: http://www.re-title.com/artists/mariana-bunimov.asp Message: Grandaughter of Maria and Marc Bunimovitch. Know of any cousins?. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Mariana Bunimov's work exists as psychoanalysis does in the terrain of childhood and that universe populated by inanimated and imaginary beings where the absurd and normal coexist in equal conditions. Dolls,hybrids between humans and toys, little cars, bicycles, doll houses constitute the image bank that feeds the body of work expressed indifferent media and in the most different support and material, inparticular those of waste: paper, pieces of fabric, old cloths, stuffedanimals, dippers, washing machine covers, etc. All the elements with which Bunimov makes her work come from her domestic surroundings, her own wardrobe, and the detritus of her daily life.
http://www.re-title.com/artists/mariana
- Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 10:15:42 (EDT)
Shalom Oded, son of Mina Shriro I do not know where from I received your message, and assuming you are not skilled in Hebrew, I am answering on the hard way, in English. I was born in Volozhin and left the shtetl in 1940 as a 15 years old boy. I knew your family. My Grand Mother Malka Perlman born Itskhaykin was related to Sara Etl (Anetka commonly known there) Shriro. I think they were cousins. I remember her well. We were with her and with Gala, at a Jewish summer resort in Roodnik 3 Km from Volozhin. Your uncle Hesl once took me on a shtetl tour on his bicycle. My cousin Moola courted your aunt Gala during the summer of 1938. Your cousin, if I remember his name - Yehuda Frid, visited Volozhin in 1935. We followed him to hear his strange sefarade Hebrew dialect, we learned and knew the Ashkenaze dialect only. Your Grand-parents are memorized in the Volozhin Yizkor Book by Hana Fried, Mina Dueck and Hilel Shriro (photo on page 26). We translated a part of the Volozhin Yizkor Book into English and posed it online at the Jewish-Gen site http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/volozhin/volozhin.html I'm pleased to help you with the little information I can Sincerly, Moshe Porat - Perlman Tel Aviv, Israel
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- Friday, May 27, 2005 at 18:53:22 (EDT)
Oded Dweck (dweck@intermail.co.il) wrote..... My grandfather Ytshak Shriro and my grandmother Sara Ester Shriro (nee Bashkin) were citizens of Volojin until the shoa. My grandfather had a pharmacy at the market street and was a scholar. My grandmother was a descendant of rabbi Chaim of Volojin. They perished in the shoa with three of their children and grandchildren. My late mother came to Israel prior to the shoa. they are probably Known to survivors of that period. I would like them to be memorialized in this important site. Oded Dweck (dweck@intermail.co.il) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Szryra Jcchak - Jcchak Szryra was born in Oszmiana, Poland to Shmuel. He was a pharmacist and married to Sara Ester nee Bezkin. Prior to WWII he lived in Wolozyn, Poland. During the war was in Wolozyn, Poland. Jcchak died in 1941 in Wolozyn, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 02/02/1956 by his daughter Mina Dweck in Ramat Gan ----------------------------------------- Szryra Sara Ester- Sara Szryra was born in Wolozyn, Poland to Shmuel amd Dreyzl . She was married to Yitzkhak. Prior to WWII she lived in Wolozyn, Poland. During the war was in Wolozyn, Poland. Sara died in 1941 in Wolozyn, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 02/02/1956 by her daughter. -------------------------------------- Szryra Heszl - Heszl Szryra was born in Wolozyn, Poland to Yitzkhak and Sara. He was a merchant and married to Rivka. Prior to WWII he lived in Wolozyn, Poland with children; Shmuel and Dreyzele. During the war was in Wolozyn, Poland. Heszl died in 1941 in Wolozyn, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 02/02/1956 by his sister Mina Dweck in Ramat Gan. ----------------------------------- Szryra Rybeka - Rybeka Szryra was born in Wolozyn, Poland. She was married to Heszl . Prior to WWII she lived in Wolozyn, Poland with children; Shmuel and Dreyzele. During the war was in Wolozyn, Poland. Rybeka died in 1941 in Wolozyn, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 02/01/1956 by her sister-in-law Mina Dweck in Ramat Gan ---------------------------- Chlopski Mirjam - Mirjam Chlopski nee Szryra was born in Wolozyn, Poland to Yitzkhak and Sara Ester. She was married to Meir and had two sons; Shmuel and Yaakov. Prior to WWII she lived in Wolozyn, Poland. During the war was in Wolozyn, Poland. Mirjam died in 1941 in Wolozyn, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 21/02/1956 by her sister Mina Dweck in Ramat Gan ---------------------------- Gurwicz Sonia - Sonia Gurwicz nee Szryra was born in Wolozyn, Poland to Yitzkhak and Sara Ester. She was married to Avraham and had a daughter; Zipale. Prior to WWII she lived in Wolozyn, Poland. During the war was in Wolozyn, Poland. Sonia died in 1941 in Wolozyn, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 02/04/1956 by her sister Mina Dweck in Ramat Gan ---------------------- Szryra Awigail Awigail Szryra was born in Wolozyn, Poland to Yitzkhak and Sara. She was single. Prior to WWII she lived in Wolozyn, Poland. During the war was in Wolozyn, Poland. Awigail died in 1941 in Wolozyn, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 02/02/1956 by her sister Mina Dweck in Ramat Gan. ----------------------- Another report ; Szryro Mosze Mosze Szryro was born in Juraciszki, Poland in 1887 to Avraham and Sara. He was a merchant and married to Rakhel nee Shapira. Prior to WWII he lived in Oszmiana, Poland. During the war was in Oszmiana, Poland. Mosze died in 1941 in Oszmiana, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/07/1955 by his sister ROITSHTEIN ESTER -----------------------------
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- Saturday, May 21, 2005 at 10:32:25 (EDT)
Robert Hofmekler (1905-1994) was the son of Motel and Bertha (Blinder) Hofmekler (spelled variously as Hofmekleris and Gofmekler). He grew up in a highly musical Jewish family in Vilna, where his father was a well-known cello player. Robert had three siblings: Zelda, Michael (b. 1898) and Leo (or M. Leo, b. 1900). In the fall of 1920 the family fled from Vilna to Kovno. Michael was a gifted violinist, who was decorated by the Lithuanian president in 1932 for his cultural achievement in propagating Lithuanian folk music in performances, recordings and transcription. Leo served as the conductor of the Lithuanian state opera in the 1930s. After the Soviets occupied Lithuania in 1940 he was appointed music director and conductor of the National Radio Orchestra in Vilna. Robert emigrated to the U.S. in the fall of 1938. Following the German occupation of Lithuania in the summer of 1941, Leo, his wife and two children were forced into the Vilna ghetto, where they all perished in 1942 or 1943. Motel and Bertha and Michael and Zelda were forced into the Kovno ghetto. Motel played in the ghetto orchestra. He and Bertha perished in the ghetto early in 1944. Zelda's husband, David Kovarsky, was dragged from his home and shot by Lithuanian nationalists during the early days of the German occupation of Kovno. Zelda and her daughter perished in an underground malina (bunker) during the final liquidation of the ghetto. Michael served as the conductor of the ghetto orchestra. He was probably deported to Stutthof during the liquidation of the ghetto and then transferred to Dachau or one of its satellite camps. In late April 1945 he was evacuated and ultimately was liberated in the vicinity of Landsberg, Bavaria. Robert, who was drafted into the U.S. Army in January 1941 and served in Europe with the 9th Infantry and 10th Armored Division, found his brother at the St. Ottilien displaced persons hospital camp in June 1945. From Yad Vashem;In regards to D. Stupel- What was his relation to Ilja Stupel? Searching for anything about a stupel family of Vilna I found in the Yad Vashem site some reports; Stupel Shemaia ( there is a picture of him playing the violin) Shemaia Stupel was born in Vilna, Poland to Avrom and Miriam. Prior to WWII he lived in Kovno, Lithuania. During the war was in Kovno. Shemaia died in Kovno. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 03/08/1978 by his relative. from the U.S; Robert Hofmekler ( there is an address) Stupel Avram Avram Stupel was born in Vilna, Poland. He was married to Miriam. Prior to WWII he lived in Kovno, Lithuania. During the war was in Kovno. Avram died in Kovno. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 08/03/1998 by his relative from the U.S; Robert Hofmekler Stupel Aleksander Aleksander Stupel was born in Wilno, Poland in 1900 to Meir and Maria. He was a violinist and single. Prior to WWII he lived in Kaunas, Lithuania. During the war was in Kaunas, Lithuania. Aleksander died in 1944 in Dachau. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/05/1999 by his nephew, (a Shoah survivor ) Eliyahu Stupel who lives in Haganim Street 9/ 27 Hod hasharon, Israel. Abramson Sonia Sonia Abramson nee Stupel was born in Wilna, Poland in 1906 to Meir/ Metia Stupel and Maria/ Miryam nee Antokolsky . She was a violinist and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Kaunas, Lithuania. During the war was in Kaunas. Sonia died in 1943 in Kaunas. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/05/1999 by her nephew Eliyahu Stupel, a Shoah survivor who lives in Haganim Street 9/ 27 Hod hasharon, Israel. Stupel Monja Monja Stupel was born in Wilna, Poland in 1892 to Avraham and Rakhel. He was an accountant and single ( in another report by a neighbor he is listed as married to Sonia and having two children age 5 and 7 who also perished in Vilna) . Prior to WWII he lived in Wilna, Poland. During the war was in Wilna, Poland. Monja died in Wilna. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his cousin Arie Stupel in Petch Tikva. The neighbor also gave report for Monjas' mother; Stupel Rachel Rachel Stupel was born in Wilna, Poland in 1870. She was a housewife and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Wilna, Poland. During the war was in Wilna, Poland. Rachel died in Panar, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 10/03/1957 by her neighbour. ... Stupel David David Stupel was born in Riga, Latvia in 1891. David died in 1942 in Auschwitz. This information is based on a list of deportation from the Netherlands found in the In Memoriam - Nederlandse oorlogsslachtoffers, Nederlandse Oorlogsgravenstichting (Dutch War Victims Authority), `s-Gravenhage (courtesy of the Association of Yad Vashem Friends in Netherlands, Amsterdam). More Details... Stupel Elfriede Elfriede Stupel nee Schereschewsky was born in Riga, Latvia in 1900. Elfriede died in 1943 in Sobibor. This information is based on a list of deportation from the Netherlands found in the In Memoriam - Nederlandse oorlogsslachtoffers, Nederlandse Oorlogsgravenstichting (Dutch War Victims Authority), `s-Gravenhage (courtesy of the Association of Yad Vashem Friends in Netherlands, Amsterdam). Blijdensteijn van May May Blijdensteijn Van nee Stuppel was born in Ogmore in 1898. May died in 1943 in Sobibor. This information is based on a list of deportation from the Netherlands found in the In Memoriam - Nederlandse oorlogsslachtoffers, Nederlandse Oorlogsgravenstichting (Dutch War Victims Authority), `s-Gravenhage (courtesy of the Association of Yad Vashem Friends in Netherlands, Amsterdam). More Details Hes Henriette Henriette Hes nee Stuppel was born in Riga, Latvia in 1877. Henriette died in 1943 in Auschwitz. This information is based on a list of deportation from the Netherlands found in the In Memoriam - Nederlandse oorlogsslachtoffers, Nederlandse Oorlogsgravenstichting (Dutch War Victims Authority), `s-Gravenhage (courtesy of the Association of Yad Vashem Friends in Netherlands, Amsterdam). More Details... Stupel Ilana Ilana Stupel was born in Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1937. Ilana died in 1943 in Sobibor. This information is based on a list of deportation from the Netherlands found in the In Memoriam - Nederlandse oorlogsslachtoffers, Nederlandse Oorlogsgravenstichting (Dutch War Victims Authority), `s-Gravenhage (courtesy of the Association of Yad Vashem Friends in Netherlands, Amsterdam). More Details... Stupel Josephine Josephine Stupel was born in Parijs, France in 1931. Josephine died in 1943 in Sobibor. This information is based on a list of deportation from the Netherlands found in the In Memoriam - Nederlandse oorlogsslachtoffers, Nederlandse Oorlogsgravenstichting (Dutch War Victims Authority), `s-Gravenhage (courtesy of the Association of Yad Vashem Friends in Netherlands, Amsterdam). Stupel Miriam Miriam Stupel was born in Vilna, Poland. Prior to WWII she lived in Kovno, Lithuania and was married to Avraham Stupel. During the war was in Kovno. Miriam died in Kovno. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 03/08/1998 by Robert Hofmekler Stupel Leo Leo Stupel was born in Wilno, Poland in 1894 to Avraham and Rakhel. He was a merchant and married to Guta nee Bek. Prior to WWII he lived in Wilno, Poland. During the war was in Wilno, Poland. Leo died in Panar, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his cousin Asna Stupel in petach Tikva. Hofmekler Berta Berta Hofmekler nee Stupel was born in Wilno, Poland. She was a musician and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Kowno, Lithuania. During the war was in Kowno, Lithuania. Berta died in Fort 9 at the age of 70. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 11/07/1999 by her granddaughter Dalia Ginzburg nee Hofmekler in Ashdod , Israel Mike Aylward wrote me...... > In regards to D. Stupel- What was his relation to Ilja Stupel? You mean Ilja Stupel the Swedish conductor? He was his grandfather (or great grandfather, I can't remember which). I was in touch with the Swedish Stupels a few years ago and they told me that when they left Lithuania after the war they unfortunately left behind any documentation (and memories) that might shed any light on the pre-war activities of their family. I tried to contact both Ilja Stupel and his brother recently, but since I last wrote to them they appear to have changed their e-mail addresses. I have discovered many more Stupel recordings in the last couple of years and I would like to tell them about them. I was assured by Ilja Stupel's brother that the Stupels were one of the leading musical families in Lithuania and that he had heard that at one time almost half of the members of the Orchestra of the Municipal Theatre in Vilna were Stupels!!! It is highly likely that the Stupels you mention were part of the same clan..... Surname Given Name Father Occupation Vilnius Vsia Vilna (City Directory) year 1915 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Address/-Telephone # Year Page # Comments Town STUPEL Ruven son of Gd - Pogulanskaya Street 14 ----------------------------------------- STUPEL S L Rudnitskaya Street 6 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2--74 1915 268 Vilnius -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- STUPEL Rokha daughter of Nokh Rudnitskaya Street 6 1915 268 Vilnius -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- STUPEL Tsez Grig Skopovka Street 5 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1915 268 Vilnius -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- STUPEL Abrham son of Vulf Steklyannaya Street 7 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1915 268 Vilnius STUPEL Vulf son of Abraham Steklyannaya Street 7 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1915 268 Vilnius -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Vilnius -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Vilnius Vsia Vilna (City Directory) Searching for Surname STUPEL in Vilna Ghetto records of 1942 (D-M code 278000) Number of hits: 14 Run on Tuesday 3 May 2005 at 13:24:44 Name- Born -Residence in Ghetto -Source-Publication-Page- Town- Uyezd-Guberniya- Month Year STUPEL, Borisas 1914 Dysnos 4 - 4 Vilna Gaon State Museum of Lithuania Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners Volume 1 83 Vilnius Vilnius May ------------------------- 1942 STUPEL, Doba 1937 Strasuno 2 - 1 Vilna Gaon State Museum of Lithuania Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners Volume 1 290 Vilnius STUPEL, Ester 1929 Ligonines 13/29 - 2 Vilna Gaon State Museum of Lithuania Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners Volume 1
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- Friday, May 20, 2005 at 10:04:00 (EDT)
THE SHOOLMAN/ SPEKTOR FAMILY OF KURENETS HAD SCHOOLS NAMED FOR THEM IN KURENETS AND IN BOSTON--------------- The initial developer of The Metropolitan was Max ( nee Elimelech Spektor) Shoolman and the cost was over $8 million. Originally the Theatre was going to be named The Capital Theatre, and attached to a hotel. Soon after construction the hotel became an office building and the theatre renamed The Metropolitan Did you know that The Wang Center for the Performing Arts is a not-for-profit organization and receives no city or federal funding? The Wang Theatre is a National Historic Landmark built in 1925. Did you know there are over a thousand light bulbs in The Wang Theatre's Grand Lobby chandeliers? Did you know when the Theatre first opened in 1925 that musicians performed in the Grand Lobby, paintings by area artists hung on the walls, ping pong and billiards where set up in the Lower Lobby to amuse people while waiting to be seated? . The Wang Center employs over 1000 people. Evelyn Shoolman Birth: September 25, 1909 - Massachusetts Death: October 31, 1986 - Boston Source: Birth, Marriage, & Death - Massachusetts Death Index, 1970-2001 Myer J Shoolman Birth: September 15, 1908 - Russia Death: April 7, 1988 - Boston Source: Birth, Marriage, & Death - Massachusetts Death Index, 1970-2001 Eliot B Shoolman Birth: April 1, 1898 - Russia Death: September 30, 1990 - Boston Source: Birth, Marriage, & Death - Massachusetts Death Index, 1970-2001 Jane F Shoolman Birth: April 6, 1902 - Massachusetts Death: November 30, 1993 - Newton Source: Birth, Marriage, & Death - Massachusetts Death Index, 1970-2001 ( Is she related?) Charles D Shoolman Birth: May 27, 1903 - Russia Death: November 2, 1995 - Newton Source: Birth, Marriage, & Death - Massachusetts Death Index, 1970-2001 Anita Shoolman Birth: August 11, 1901 - Other Death: November 3, 1995 - Newton Source: Birth, Marriage, & Death - Massachusetts Death Index, 1970-2001 1920 Census; Name: Max Shoolman Age: 43 years Estimated birth year: abt 1877 Birthplace: Russia Race: White Home in 1920: Chesnat Hill, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts Came to the country in 1893 na in 1900 Real Estate owner and operator Wife May Rae was born in Pennsylvenia to Russian parents. she is 35 years old daughter Ester/ Evelyn is 10 years old born in Mass. daughter Hellen is 7 years old born in Mass. son Theodore 1 years old born in Mass. Nephew; Elliot B is 21 years old, came to the country from Russia in 1914. Also living in the house; a nurse maid from England Maid from Irland cook from Irland Brother in Law ? Levinton Edward? age 24? consruction of real estate ------------------------------------- 1930 census; Name: Elliot B Shoolman Age: 32 Estimated birth year: abt 1898 Birthplace: Poland Relation to head-of-house: Head owner of a shoe store, Jewish came to the country in 1913 married at age 28 Spouse's Name: Shaulamite ( Miel Dori told me that she is a relative of Gidon Altshular from Rehovot) Shoolman age 27 married at age 23 Race: White came to the country from Serbia in 1917 Home in 1930: New Bedford, Bristol, Massachusetts ------------------------- Name: Joseph Shoolman Age: 68 Estimated birth year: abt 1862 Birthplace: Russia Relation to head-of-house: Head married at age 18 came to the U.S. in 1890. renting the home for $80 a month Spouse's Name: Bessie Shoolman also 68 married at age 18 Race: White Home in 1930: Brookline, Norfolk, Massachusetts came to the U.S. in 1890 Thelma A granddaughter? age 17 is living with them, born in Mass to Russian parents ------------------------- Benjamin Shoolman Age: 32 years Estimated birth year: abt 1888 Birthplace: Russia Race: White Home in 1920: Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts ----------------------------------------- census 1910; Morris Shoolman Birth: abt 1878 Residence: 1910 - 3-Wd Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut Source: Census - 1910 United States Federal Census ------------------ census 1930; Max Shoolman Birth: abt 1878 - Russia Residence: 1930 - Brookline, Norfolk, Massachusetts Source: Census - 1930 United States Federal Census May R Shoolman Birth: abt 1886 Residence: 1930 - Brookline, Norfolk, Massachusetts Source: Census - 1930 United States Federal Census Evelyn Shoolman Birth: abt 1910 Residence: 1930 - Brookline, Norfolk, Massachusetts Source: Census - 1930 United States Federal Census Helen Shoolman Birth: abt 1912 Residence: 1930 - Brookline, Norfolk, Massachusetts Source: Census - 1930 United States Federal Census Theodore Shoolman Birth: abt 1919 Residence: 1930 - Brookline, Norfolk, Massachusetts Source: Census - 1930 United States Federal Census ------------------------ EDITH SHOOLMAN'S HEBREW COLLEGE LEGACY-------------- BY JODI WERNER GREENWALD---------- Edith Shoolman was a passionate gardener. And her gardenlush with flowers and ornamentalswas not the only place graced by her nourishing cultivation. One of Hebrew College's most significant benefactors, a woman with a deep commitment to children, teacher training and Jewish education, she named and endowed the Shoolman Graduate School of Jewish Education in 1993 with a $2 million bequest made after the death of her husband, Eliot z'l. When Mrs. Shoolman died in April at age 98, she ensured that the Shoolman Graduate School would continue to flourish with another generous gifta $1 million bequest. That gift, which will help to support new programs for the professional training of Jewish educators, exemplifies her quiet and generous philanthropy. President David Gordis remembers her as "self effacing" and "a very fine and refined lady, really an artist and an aristocrat." Initially, she resisted the idea of naming the school. "I had to persuade her that it would be an example for others," he says. Concerned with the impact of their gifts and not the recognition, Mrs. Shoolman and her husband were a rare brand of philanthropist. Always seeking ways to enhance the lives of children, they renewed their interest in Hebrew College through their close friend and attorney, former Hebrew College board chairman Herbert Berman z'l. (Mr. Shoolman's uncle, Max Shoolman, was an original incorporator named in the 1927 Charter of the College.) After her husband passed away, Mrs. Shoolman spoke daily with Berman. His friendship and support became a pillar in her life, and when Berman passed away, his son Henry inherited their daily relationship, which he now calls "a gift." > "She and Mr. Shoolman were generous out of genuine philanthropic > interest, not out of wanting to see their names in lights," says > Berman, who delivered remarks at Mrs. Shoolman's funeral. > > "They were clearly part of our family, if not in law, certainly in love." > > Mrs. Shoolman had no patience for what she perceived as wasteful > spending, Berman says. He recalls visiting with her one afternoon when > her mail arrived. One of the envelopes was decorated with gold foil, > and she said, "What are they wasting money for? Isn't there a kid who > needs glasses or schoolbooks?" > > The Shoolmans' zeal for supporting education inspired them to endow > the Edith and Eliot Shoolman Fellowship, awarded to Hebrew College > students active in the field of Jewish education as teachers or > administrators. They were also benefactors of the Solomon Schechter > Day School in Newton and Bridgewater State College, Mrs. Shoolman's > alma mater, where they established an award given annually to a senior > who has shown creative excellence in the study of English. > > In 1996, Hebrew College awarded Mrs. Shoolman an honorary degree for > her contribution to the field of Jewish educationthough it took some > persuasion. She did not acquiesce until Theodore H. Teplow, trustee, > former board chairman and a close family friend, wrote her a letter > conveying Hebrew College's strong desire to properly thank and > acknowledge her for being an exemplary community member, and that her > acceptance of this degree would be yet another gift to the > institution. > > At the commencement exercises, her modest approach to giving was > publicly recognized by the presenter, Herbert Berman's widow and > former Hebrew College director and trustee, Evelyn Berman: "Countless > [people] have unknowingly been the beneficiary of your love and > concern for your fellow human being. You have chosen to better their > lives with the only reward being their success and happiness. > > "Like the plants and trees of your garden, which you lovingly nurture > year after year, so have you assisted, and in turn improved, the > community." > > President Gordis adds: "Edith Shoolman was one of the early pioneers > of the evolution of Hebrew College. Her commitment to the Shoolman > Graduate School is what moved us ahead to where we are now. She left > an important mark on the College." > > The Hebrew College community mourns the loss of Edith Shoolman and > expresses its deepest sympathies to her sister, Frances Cohen; her > stepson, David Shoolman; and her niece, Ruth Donovan. May her memory > forever be a blessing. > > THE HERBERT L. BERMAN, '36 SCHOLARSHIP > > The Herbert L. Berman '36 Scholarship was established by The Eliot > Shoolman Charitable Lead Trust to commemorate Mr. Berman's dedication > to educational pursuits and community involvement > THE WANG THEATRE > > -------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------ > > > Ship of Travel: Stockholm -Port of Departure: Gothenburg -Date of Arrival: January 12, 1921 First Name: Seimel Last Name: Ispektow ( Should say Spektor- in the U.S was changed to Shoolman) Ethnicity: Poland, Hebrew Born in Kurenitz Last Place of Residence: Kravo, Poland Date of Arrival: January 12, 1921 Age at Arrival: 52 years old Gender: M Marital Status: M Ship of Travel: Stockholm Port of Departure: Gothenburg Going to brother; Max Shoolman, 18 Dreymont Street, Boston he is 5' 8" with grey hair and brown eyes Manifest Line Number: 0001 First Name: Chaja Last Name: Ispektow Ethnicity: Poland, Hebrew Last Place of Residence: Kravo, Poland Date of Arrival: January 12, 1921 Age at Arrival: 47y Gender: F Marital Status: M Ship of Travel: Stockholm Port of Departure: Gothenburg Manifest Line Number: 0002 Going to brother in law in Boston.She was born in Krevo, 5'2" , blond hair and grey eyes. ---- First Name: Chemach ( Charles?) Last Name: Ispektow Ethnicity: Poland, Hebrew Last Place of Residence: Kravo, Poland Date of Arrival: January 12, 1921 Age at Arrival: 17y Gender: M Marital Status: S Ship of Travel: Stockholm Port of Departure: Gothenburg Manifest Line Number: 0003 5' 3" blond and brown eyes --- First Name: Klejla Last Name: Ispektow Ethnicity: Poland, Hebrew Last Place of Residence: Kravo, Poland Date of Arrival: January 12, 1921 Age at Arrival: 16y Gender: F Marital Status: S Ship of Travel: Stockholm Port of Departure: Gothenburg Manifest Line Number: 0004 5'1" dark hair and brown eyes --------- First Name: Nachama Last Name: Ispektow Ethnicity: Poland, Hebrew Last Place of Residence: Kravo, Poland Date of Arrival: January 12, 1921 Age at Arrival: 13y Gender: F Marital Status: S Ship of Travel: Stockholm Port of Departure: Gothenburg Manifest Line Number: 0005 blond and brown eyes ------------------------- First Name: Meier Last Name: Ispektow Ethnicity: Poland, Hebrew Last Place of Residence: Kravo, Poland Date of Arrival: January 12, 1921 Age at Arrival: 11y Gender: M Marital Status: S Ship of Travel: Stockholm Port of Departure: Gothenburg Manifest Line Number: 0006 blond and brown eyes -------------------------- First Name: Gita Last Name: Ispektow Ethnicity: Poland, Hebrew Last Place of Residence: Kravo, Poland Date of Arrival: January 12, 1921 Age at Arrival: 9y Gender: F Marital Status: S Ship of Travel: Stockholm Port of Departure: Gothenburg Manifest Line Number: 0007 blond and brown eyes -------------------------- First Name: Ester Last Name: Ispektow Ethnicity: Poland, Hebrew Last Place of Residence: Kravo, Poland Date of Arrival: January 12, 1921 Age at Arrival: 8y Gender: F Marital Status: S Ship of Travel: Stockholm Port of Departure: Gothenburg Manifest Line Number: 0008 blond and brown eyes ---------------------------- First Name: Leja Last Name: Ispektow Ethnicity: Poland, Hebrew Last Place of Residence: Kravo, Poland Date of Arrival: January 12, 1921 Age at Arrival: 7y Gender: F Marital Status: S Ship of Travel: Stockholm Port of Departure: Gothenburg Manifest Line Number: 0009 blond and brown eyes ------------------- For all the kids it is writen that they are going to their grandfather; max Shoolman
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- Thursday, May 19, 2005 at 20:23:01 (EDT)
Kira wrote me about information I had of BREWDA, Leah Found in Lithuania Vilnius Lithuanian Holocaust Survivers Lists - She wrote that she might be her great aunt. Dear Kira, Thank you so much for writing about your great aunt. I would like to write a little story about your family on the site to help you find more information. I took the information from; The LitvakSIG The All Lithuania Database; The information appearing within this database is taken both from original databases, as well as indexes of names contained in three post-WW2 books on Lithuania: The Annihilation of Lithuanian Jewry by Abraham Oshry Lithuanian Jewish Communities by Nancy and Stuart Schoenberg Bravery and Heroism in Lithuania by Alex Feitelson and a number of lists published by the American Federation of Lithuanian Jews in 1945/46 of Lithuanian Jews found to have survived the Holocaust. For further information, contact Ed Cohen eacohen@mail1.nai.net From the list; BREWDA, Leah Found in Lithuania Vilnius Lithuanian Holocaust Survivers Lists year; 1945 BREWDA, Zlata Found in Lithuania Vilnius Lithuanian Holocaust Survivers Lists 1945 In the Vilna ghetto Lists of Prisoners Volume 1 of the year 1942 month of May, I did not see them. I am pasting who was there; BAREVDA, Menacha born;1893 lived; Strasuno 1 BREVDA, Resa born 1925 Strasuno 1 BREVDA, Sara 1916 Strasuno 1 PROBAITE, Nechama 1926 Strasuno 1 From Yad Vashem reports of Brewda from Vilna; Brewda David David Brewda was born in Wilna, Poland in 1906 to Yisrael and Mariasha. He was a clerk and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Wilna, Poland. During the war was in Wilna, Poland. David died in Wilna, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his sister Shreyer Tova Hakishon Street, Haifa Moshe Brewde was born in Vilna, Poland in 1902 to Yisrael. He was a merchant and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Vilna, Poland. During the war was in Vilna, Poland. Moshe died in Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his sister Shreyer Tova Hakishon Street, Haifa Chaia Brewda was born in Wilno, Poland in 1909. She was a housewife and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Wilno, Poland. During the war was in Wilno, Poland. Chaia died in Ponary. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her sister-in-law Shreyer Tova Hakishon Street, Haifa Kagan Keila Keila Kagan was born in Wilno, Poland in 1900 to Yisrael and Mariasha Brewda. She was a housewife and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Wilno, Poland. During the war was in Wilno, Poland. Keila died in Ponary. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her sister Shreyer Tova Hakishon Street, Haifa Brewda Tzipora* Tzipora Brewda was born in Baranowicze, Poland to Nakhum and Rakhel. She was a housewife and married to Yosef. Prior to WWII she lived in Wilna, Poland. During the war was in Baranowicze, Poland. Tzipora died in Baranowicze, Poland at the age of 62. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 29/11/1956 by her relative Sara Kosovsky from Kiryat Chaim Since there is a strong connection to the town Baranowicze I am pasting just a few of the many reports ( It seems that the name Brewda originated in Baranowicze) Brewda Eliahu Eliahu Brewda was born in Baranowicze, Poland to Yosef. He was a merchant. Prior to WWII he lived in Baranowicze, Poland. During the war was in Baranowicze, Poland. Eliahu died in Baranowicze, Poland at the age of 42. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 29/11/1956 by his relative Sara Kosovsky from Kiryat Chaim Brewda Yosef Yosef Brewda was born in Baranowicze, Poland. He was a merchant and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Baranowicze, Poland. During the war was in Baranowicze, Poland. Yosef died in Baranowicze, Poland at the age of 64. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 29/11/1956 by his relative Sara Kosovsky from Kiryat Chaim. ... Brevdo Haia Haia Brevdo was born in Wilno, Poland in 1922 to David and Sara. She was single. Prior to WWII she lived in Wilno, Poland. During the war was in Wilno, Poland. Haia died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/12/1956 by her cousin Shalom Prutiansky in Tel Aviv Brewde Lea Lea Brewde was born in Baranowice, Poland c 1888. Lea died in Baranowice, Poland at the age of 55. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/04/1956 by Noakh Ritman Please give me some more information so I could do a better search.-- Best regards, Eilat
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- Thursday, May 19, 2005 at 14:37:03 (EDT)
Reasearching the family of the well known Yiddish play writer; Jacob Gordin ( died in New York in 1909)---- I found his wife; Anna Gordin, living with daughter, Nettie and and son Leon in the 1920 census. Name: Anna Gordin Age: 57 years ( Beth, her great granddaughter, told me that she was born in 1859)------ Estimated birth year: abt 1863--- Birthplace: Russia------- Race: White------ Home in 1920: Bronx, Bronx, New York------ Home owned: rented---- Marital status: widow--- Year of immigration: 1890-- Able to read & write:----- Roll: T625_1141 Page: 7A ED: 418------ They wrote that the family spoke German ( most likely Yiddish)-- She lived with son Leon, age 24, accountant ( Commercial?) and daughter Nettie, age 26, Secretary ( Commercial?)---- They wrote that she came to the country in 1890 and was Na in 1902 ------------------------- In the 1910 census Name: Anna J Gordin a widow- Age in 1910: 50- Estimated birth year: abt 1860- Home in 1910: 23-Wd Brooklyn, Kings, New York-- Race: White-- Gender: Female-- Series: T624- Roll: 972- Part: 2- Page: 97A- Year: 1910- living with her were seven children. Sons Samuel? age 29, Alexander? age 28, James?, age 24 and George?, age 18 were born in Russia, daughter Nettie, age 19 also born in Russia; They arrived to the country from Russia in 1893 and then Anna had a son age Leon age 15, and a daughter Hellen, age 13, both born in New York ----------------- Name: Leon Gordin-- -Last Residence: Florida--- Born: 31 Mar 1895--- Died: Nov 1965--- State (Year) SSN issued: Florida (1959 )--- 1930 census; Leon Gordin Manhattan, New York, NY abt 1898 New York an insurance salesman, Son-in-law of Jacob Greenfield, living with the Greenfields Estelle Gordin daughter of Jacob Greenfield and Sadie Manhattan, New York, NY born abt 1907 France Greenfield daughter of Jacob Greenfield and Sadie Manhattan, New York, NY born abt 1913 ------ Name: George Gordin City: Brooklyn County: Kings State: New York Birthplace: Russia Birth Date: 31 Aug 1891 Race: White Roll: 1754502 DraftBoard: 62 -------------------- I found son James in the 1930 census---- James J Gordin Bronx, Bronx, NY born abt 1887 Russia Head Forman in Laundry?MARRIED AT AGE 24.----- Nettie Gordin Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1893 Wife BORN IN PENNSYLVANIA--- James Gordin Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1912 Son BORN IN NEW YORK---- Victor Gordin Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1919 Son BORN IN NEW YORK----- -------------------- Name: James Gordin -Last Residence: 10462 Bronx, Bronx, New York, United States of America Born: 13 Dec 1886 Died: Apr 1968 State (Year) SSN issued: New York (Before 1951 ) ----------------- His son (James Gordin Bronx, Bronx, NY born abt 1912 Son) ; Name: James Gordin - Last Residence: 08759 Whiting, Ocean, New Jersey, United States of America Born: 18 May 1911 Died: Aug 1978 State (Year) SSN issued: New York (Before 1951 ) --------------------------- -Name: Margaret Gordin - Last Residence: 08759 Whiting, Ocean, New Jersey, United States of America Born: 4 Oct 1911 Died: 16 Nov 1995 State (Year) SSN issued: New York (Before 1951 --------------------- from 1994; Name: M GORDIN Address: 23 PANDA LN City: WHITING State: NJ Zipcode: 08759 Phone: (908) 555-1212 ------------------ another son; ( Victor Gordin Bronx, Bronx, NY abt 1919 ) Name: Victor A. Gordin -Last Residence: 12776 Roscoe, Sullivan, New York, United States of America Born: 7 Nov 1918 Died: 15 Jul 1996 State (Year) SSN issued: New York (1972-1973 ) -------------- I found Alexander in the 1920 Census; Name: Alexander J Gordin- Age: 38 years--- Estimated birth year: abt 1882--- Birthplace: Russia--- Race: White--- Home in 1920: 107 W. 76 St. Manhattan, New York, New York--- Home owned: rented--- Play writer--- Marital status: single--- Year of immigration: 1894 na 1902---- Able to read & write: yes---- Roll: T625_1197 Page: 1A ED: 561 Image: 1044 -------------- Daughter Elizabeth; 1920 census; Name: David Kobin Age: 37 years Estimated birth year: abt 1883 Birthplace: Odessa, Russia Race: White Home in 1920: rented 2150 Pichin? Ave Brooklyn, Kings, New York : Year of immigration: 1896 Able to read & write: yes He is a collector of a life insurance ( sounds like a "nice job") Page: 14A Marital status: Married to Elizabeth who was born in Odessa, Russia about 37 years ago ( in 1920) to parents who were born in Odessa, Russia. She came to the country in 1898- there were not citizens in 1920. All their children were born in New York; Paul was 14 in 1920--- Ella was 12-- Eugene was 10--- Lucy 7--- Vera 5--- there was no Robert in 1920.--- ED: 1417 Image: 0141 -Paul Kobin; Birth Date 23 Nov 1905 Death Date May 1976 Last Residence Brooklyn, Kings, New York ( he lived in Brooklyn all his life) --------------------- -Name: Eugene Kobin Last Residence: 90025 Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America Born: 19 Mar 1909 Last Benefit: 55426 Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota, United States of America Died: Oct 1984 State (Year) SSN issued: Minnesota (Before 1951 ) -------------------------------- his son; Name: Neil Kobin Birth Date: 19 Feb 1936 Birth County: Saint Louis Birth State: Minnesota Father: Eugene Kobin Mother: Helen Sukov File Number: 1936-MN-046807 ---------------------------------------- Name: Neil Kobin Born: 19 Feb 1936 Died: 29 Jul 1995 State (Year) SSN issued: Minnesota (1951 ) Name: NEIL KOBIN Birth Date: 02/19/1936 00:00:00 Death Date: 07/29/1995 00:00:00 Death Place: HENNEPIN , Minnesota State File Number: 019468 Mother's Maiden Name: SUKOV his mother; Name: Helen Kobin Last Residence: 55426 Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota, United States of America Born: 6 Feb 1907 Died: 16 Jan 1996 State (Year) SSN issued: Minnesota (Before 1951 ) ----------------------- Family of daughter Nettie; Michael Kaplan Hempstead, Nassau, NY born abt 1893 New York Head Nettie Kaplan Hempstead, Nassau, NY born abt 1896 Wife Gordin Kaplan Hempstead, Nassau, NY abt 1923 Son Edgar Kaplan Hempstead, Nassau, NY abt 1925 Son ----- Go to the Gordin family on this site for more information and pictures
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- Thursday, May 19, 2005 at 14:26:26 (EDT)
On 5/16/05, ilana harwayne-gidansky wrote to the Belarus sig: I cannot seem to find any census data for ANY of my family names in Belarus, and can't find anyone from the town of Kopatkevichi. Does anyone have any information on the surnames listed below? > GURVITCH, HURWITZ-- Kopatkevichi, Belarus---- Dear Ilana, Yad vashem is a very good source of information. Checking for the town of Kopatkevichi I found 126reports. I am pasting here 3 generations reports of Gurvich/ Gurvitch family of Kopatkevichi; Gurvich Feiga Feiga Gurvich was born in Kopatkevichi, Belorussia in 1866. She was a housewife and a widow of Motel. Prior to WWII she lived in Petrikov, Belorussia. During the war was in Petrikov, Belorussia. Feiga died in 1941 in Petrikov, Belorussia at the age of 75. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 26/10/1998 by her great-granddaughter VIKTORIA MILAN of Florida Gurevich Sheil Sheil Gurevich was born in Kopatkevichi, Belorussia in 1893 to Motel and Feiga. He was a forester. Prior to WWII he lived in Kopatkevichi, Belorussia. During the war was in Petrikov, Belorussia. Sheil died in 1941 in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 15/11/1998 by his relative VIKTORIA MILAN Ginsburg Ester Ester Ginsburg nee Gurvich was born in Kopatkevichi, Belorussia in 1897 to Matel and Feiga. She was a chef and married to Samuil. Prior to WWII she lived in Petrikov, Belorussia. During the war was in Petrikov, Belorussia. Ester died in 1941 in Petrikov, Belorussia. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 26/10/1998 by her granddaughter VIKTORIA MILAN Gurvich Stysya Stysya Gurvich was born in Kopatkevitch, Belorussia in 1926 to Sheil. Prior to WWII she lived in Kopatkevichi, Belorussia. During the war was in Petrikov, Ukraine. Stysya died in 1941 in Petrikov, Ukraine. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 15/11/1998 by her relative For both reports; Submitter's Last Name MILAN Submitter's First Name VIKTORIA Language RUSSIAN Viktoria gave her address in Florida in English. Gurvich Michail Michail Gurvich was born in Kopatkevichi, Belorussia in 1928 to Sheil. Prior to WWII he lived in Kopatkevichi, Belorussia. During the war was in Kopatkevichi, Belorussia. Michail died in 1941 in Kopatkevichi, Belorussia. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 15/11/1998 by his niece VIKTORIA MILAN. VIKTORIA MILAN gave other reports of family members. You should try to locate her or other family members in the Florida address she gave as well as checking other reports from the town . Good luck, Eilat Gordin Levitan
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- Thursday, May 19, 2005 at 13:42:54 (EDT)
I am the grandson of a Vilejka born Jew, I am interested in obtaining the full English version of this book, please inform me of how this is possible. Translation of Sefer zikaron kehilat Wilejka ha-mehozit, pelekh Vilna ---- Edited by Kalman Farber and Joseph Se'evi ---- Published in Tel Aviv, 1972 ---- In addition, if you have any advice of how to obtain any information on my family, surname Troscianiecki, My great grandfather , Szojel Troscianiecki married Hinda Dubin, the sister of S.H. Dubin ( Shlomo Chaim Dubin, leader of the community of Vileika before the war was sent with his family to exile during the Soviet time- he survived the war and came to Israel- He wrote many chapters in the Yizkor book), I am trying to locate my grandfather's. Aron Troscianiecki's birth certificate. He was born in Wilejka in 1926. Regards, Grant Tross (Troscianiecki)
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- Thursday, May 19, 2005 at 13:31:55 (EDT)
Mr. Levitan, please note the first two messages on your Oshmyany site in "guest book" are obscene, spam type. You might want to delete these some how. I had another idea. Perhaps instead of incuding names of researchers on your site, you should refer people to JewishGen JGFF. Then they would have to properly register to have access to this information. ALthough I am an ardent genealogist (most active 20 years ago though), I still am very sensitive about my identity, privacy, etc. Identity theft, harassment, etc. Dear Mr. Levitan, another comment on your wonderful Oshmyany site...I think you should double check the punctuation on the description of the location of the town in the various countries over the different historical periods. It is a little confusing, the use of the ;, the semi-colon. Thank you, Heidi F
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- Wednesday, May 18, 2005 at 13:54:48 (EDT)
Today I called Chain Taicz in Kibbutz Dorot, Israel. Chaim taicz@dorot.org.il and taicz_1950@hotmail.com, wrote me how happy he was to find the Druja site with pictures of his grandfathers' grave ( Kalman Taicz) and his uncle Shia, who survived the war as a partisan. Shia died in the area of Druja c 1970. Chaims' father; Shulem Taicz, was born in 1904 to Kalman and Chaia. He left Druja in 1925 and moved to Argentina. He came with his children to Israel in 1965 and died there in 1970. Some reports from Yad Vashem; Tajc Chaja ======= Chaja Tajc was born in Droja, Poland in 1877. She was a housewife and a widow of Kalman. Prior to WWII she lived in Droja, Poland. During the war was in Droja, Poland. Chaja died in 1942 in Droja, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/03/1957 by her acquaintance Chaia Livshitz from Kiryat Ono, Israel Tajc Zalman ========= Zalman Tajc was born in Droja, Poland in 1910 to Kalman and Khaia. He was a merchant and single. Prior to WWII he lived in Droja, Poland. During the war was in Droja, Poland. Zalman died in 1942 in Droja, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/03/1957 by his acquaintance Chaia Livshitz from Kiryat Ono, Israel Tajc Chaim ======== Chaim Tajc was born in Droja, Poland in 1902 to Kalman and Khaia. He was a butcher and married to Sara nee Glazer. Prior to WWII he lived in Droja, Poland. During the war was in Droja, Poland. Chaim died in 1942 in Droja, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/03/1957 by his acquaintance Tajc Sara Mirjam ======== Sara Mirjam Tajc nee Glazer was born in Droja, Poland in 1907 to Gedalia. She was a housewife and married to Khaim. Prior to WWII she lived in Droja, Poland. During the war was in Droja, Poland. Mirjam died in 1942 in Droja, Poland with son Kelman age 10 and another son age 8. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/03/1957 by her acquaintance Chaia Livshitz from Kiryat Ono, Israel Lurie Sara Tzila nee Teitz========== Tzila Lurie nee Teitz was born in Droja, Poland in 1892 to Kalman and Khaia. She was a housewife and married to Khaim. Prior to WWII she lived in Droja, Poland. During the war was in Droja, Poland. Tzila died in 1942 in Droja, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/03/1957 by her relative from Israel, Chaia Livshitz from Kiryat Ono, Israel ----------------------- Taitz Aron Chaim========= Aron Chaim Taitz was born in Druja, Poland in 1904 to Kalman and Rokhl Nadel. He was a clerk and married to Sora. Prior to WWII he lived in Druja, Poland. During the war was in Druja, Poland. Aron died in 1942 in Druja, Poland at the age of 38. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his nephew from Russia Dejcz Jcchok =========== Jcchok Dejcz was born in Widze, Poland in 1887 to Khaim and Perel. He was a fruit trader and married to Sara nee Kofkin. Prior to WWII he lived in Druja, Poland. During the war was in Druja. Jcchok died in 1942 in Druja. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his son Dejcz Sara ======= Sara Dejcz was born in Druja, Poland in 1898 to Beniamin and Hinda. She was a housewife and married to Yitzkhak. During the war was in Druja. Sara died in 1942 in Druja. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her son Dejcz Mojsce ====== Mojsce Dejcz was born in Druja, Poland in 1912 to Yitzkhak and Sara. He was a journalist and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Druja, Poland. During the war was in Druja, Poland. Mojsce died in 1942 in Druja, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his brother Dajtsz Ester ======== Ester Dajtsz was born in Droja, Poland in 1915 to Mendel and Bela. She was a housewife and single. Prior to WWII she lived in Droja, Poland. During the war was in Droja, Poland. Ester died in 1942 in Droja, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/03/1957 by her acquaintance. Dajtsz Sara ========== Sara Dajtsz was born in Druja, Poland in 1911 to Mendel. She was a seamstress and single. Prior to WWII she lived in Druja, Poland. During the war was in Druja, Poland. Sara died in 1942 in Druja, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/03/1957 by Khaia Lifshitz Dajtsz Nechama ========== Nechama Dajtsz was born in Druja, Poland in 1917 to Mendel and Bela. She was a housewife and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Druja, Poland. During the war was in Druja, Poland. Nechama died in 1942 in Druja, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/03/1957 by her acquaintance. Rotenberg Ita nee Dejcz Ita Rotenberg was born in Druja, Poland in 1906 to Yitzkhak and Sara. She was a housewife and married to Yisrael. During the war was in Druja. Ita died in 1942 in Druja. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her brother. Rotenberg Israel Israel Rotenberg was born in Druja, Poland in 1906. He was a bank clerk and married to Ita nee Doich. Prior to WWII he lived in Druja, Poland. During the war was in Druja, Poland. Israel died in 1942 in Druja, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his brother-in-law
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- Saturday, May 14, 2005 at 13:28:06 (EDT)
Message: Have returned yesterday from Yom Hashoah at Auschwitz. We live in Cape town South Africa, where my mother lived for the last 10 years of her life and died there in 1992. She came to South Africa in 1930 from Derechin and left 6 siblings, their spouses, children and her parents. they all were shot and dumped in mass graves around 1942 by the Germans. Their name was Agulnik sometimes known as Ogulnik. This was a large family in Derechin and Baranowicz. We have the Derechin Yiskor book where the family features prominently in many photos. If anyone has any other information about this extended family we would love to know as much as possible Thank You Denise Dogon (dogon@iafrica.com)
Denise Dogon <dogon@iafrica.com>
- Friday, May 13, 2005 at 13:15:10 (EDT)
my name is Naomi Baum. I am the daughter of Max Podberesky form Alexandros, Russia. Max' father was Louis Podberesky from Vishinev, Vilna, Russia. He was Married to Luba Finklestein. They had 6 children, Sara ( 1907), Lea (1909), Mordeche(1910), Rebecca(1912), Harry (1914) , Roslyn (1916) who was a twin ..I live in Totronto, Canada and would like to trace back to my roots for my children.i f you wish to contact me you can at my email address.thanks and hope you find what your looking for. bye..........for now....... naomibaum@hotmail.com
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- Friday, May 13, 2005 at 13:10:02 (EDT)
I have read the Dunilovichi page for the first time, you have made a great effort and I appreciate this. My name is Daniel Wainer, born in Buenos Aires, and now living in Kiriat Bialik since 1999. I am the grandson of Meyer Svirsky Z"L and Itke Ligumsky Z"L. Meyer's father was Yoel Pinie Svirsky (image #dun-23:), and Itke's father was Shmuel Ligumsky. My grand parents abandoned Dunilovicze before the Holocaust, Mayer's brother is Nachke Svirsky Z"L (image #dun-23:) who also went to Argentina before the War. Itke's brother Abraham Z"L (Abrashe) also lived in Buenos Aires, his daughters are now living in Kiriat Motzkin and Natania. As I know, two sisters of Mayer and Nachke (image #dun-23:) survived the Shoa and lived in Siberia in the USSR, they were some time in contact by mail after the war, but I have no idea what happened with them, and even do not know their names. May be that their descendents made aliah with the big Russian inmigration. As you know there is a book about the shtetles in the region of glubokie, edited in Yidish in Buenos Aires, Nahke was one of the colaborators. I know a person who is in possesion of one, and can easily be achieved. Daniel Wainer Kiriat Bialik dwainer@netvision.net.il
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. - Thursday, April 28, 2005 at 20:12:08 (EDT)
From: bob@becker-ks.com (Bob Becker) Date: 19 Apr 2005, 11:31:58 PM Home Page: http://www.haynt.org Message: I have information about Shmuel B. Yatskan, founder of the the newspaper "Haynt", at www.haynt.org.
Bob Becker <bob@becker-ks.com>
- Saturday, April 23, 2005 at 14:08:46 (EDT)
From: shemi_buff@hotmail.com (Gady Margalit) I am the Son of Ilana Margalit (Hesta Shapiro) the daughter of Rosa and Yaakov Shapiro son of Sara Gerstein and Gesic Shapiro My Mom and my nephew came across your PDF file when searching for Nina Shapiro phone number and immediately recognized it as part of our family tree. I have tried to build the family tree for quite some time and it is the first time I came across such detailed structure of my Great grandmother Sarah Gerstein (who her name was unknown to me till I saw in your site). My Mom Hesta Shapiro (now known as Ilana Margalit) is Married and have 4 children and 13 grandchildren. (all Live in Israel) Alik Shapiro is married and have 3 children, It was a nice surprise to see what a huge and live family tree I have from my mother side (who when I was 13 and needed to do a family tree for Scholl gave me a note to school that we don t have a family tree) Now I am 34 and I see that we have and a big one indeed. Thanks Eilat for posting the family tree..
Gady Margalit
- Saturday, April 23, 2005 at 10:27:17 (EDT)
ALERT TO FAMILY OF CHAIM ABRAMSON, Bnai Brak: My Family Names: Abramson/Milkovsky/Dudman/Davidson/Chumash/Shevin/Drexler/Many more. My families were from Kreva and Vishneveh. Hello to all my relatives in Israel, even though I only know a few of you. I have been reading a lot in these pages about my great uncle Sholom Abramson's brother Chaim, who came to live in B'nai B'rak. Sadly, I have never been to Israel, but many family members have. I am 44 and the youngest on all sides of the family, this generation. Chaim's daughter Laika and her husband Avram Gofer and their family have come to New York to see my family and I last saw Laika in 2000 at my mother Rhea's home in Rochester, NY. I especially remember Laika's son Noam and her daughter Tali (Gordin). There was also a relative named Ziva who came to see us who was very sweet to me. My father Sheldon and his sister Ella were the children of Sam Drexler and Ida Millkofsky. My aunt Ella (Shevin), is also in Rochester. Ida's parents were Abram Millkofsky and Shayna Fruma (Fanny) Abramson. Shayna's parent's were Eliahu and Itta Abramson (Chaim's grandparents). My gramma Ida's sister, my great aunt Anna, was married to Sholom Abramson (Chaim's brother), her first cousin! So, this gets confusing! To make it more confusing, my great gramma Shayna and her sister Shlaveh(Sylvia) married Millkofsky brothers! Shlaveh's husband was Jacob Millkofsky. I would love to hear from any of you. I live in Portland, Oregon. Telephone: 503-285-6812. Email: thedrex@comcast.net. I also have family in Israel on my mother's side. My mom's mom was Channa Yitta (Yetta) Friedman Lipchitz. She was from Glowaczow (Pronounced Gluvachuv) Poland. It was a tiny Shtetl south, and maybe west of Warsaw.
Karen Drexler <thedrex@comcast.net>
- Friday, April 22, 2005 at 20:57:44 (EDT)
Volozhin Descendants in Israel THE MULTI-SHTETL MEMORIAL SERVICE OF SHOAH MARTYRS FROM RADUSHKOVITSH-KRASNE-HORODOK-RAKOV-VOLOZHIN AREA The multi-Shtetl Memorial Service took place in the WIZO House, 38 David Hamelekh Str. Tel Aviv at Sunday Evening, on April 5, 2005. On the agenda were Words of the shtetl representatives, El Male Rahamim & Kaddish, Candles lighting and refreshments. The purpose of the AZKARA was to pass on the memory of our annihilated congregations to the young generation. The hall was filled with about 130 people, most of them Shoah survivors' children and grand children. Some 20 participants were children of Volozhin descendants and among them: Michl Wand Polak's daughter and two grand daughters, Binie Kahanovitsh's two grand sons, Shlomo Goloventshits daughter, Benyamin Shishko's daughter, Mendl Potashnik's brother, Hayim Potashniks children, Leah Nahshon-Shif's son, Shaye Lavit's daughter, Shvartsberg's children, two of my grand kids (they lighted the sixth candle), Leyzer Melzer with his son and others. Dr Isaak Zilburg conducted the ceremony. The shtetl's representatives delivered speeches. Radushkovitsh was represented by Tsila Zilburgh, Horodok by yakov Eydelman, Rakov by Grinholz Krasne by Shimon Grinhoyz. Brunia Rabinovitsh, who survived the Horodok Ghetto read her poesy about the murdered children. I, Moshe Porat-Perlman represented Volozhin. Here is some of my speech; .During the last five years we did not organize a Volozhin Martyrs Memorial Service. Many who were born in our shtetl passed away recently, may they rest in peace: The Deceased from Volozhin who made Aliya in the thirties, were paramount among those who produced and lay the foundation to our state of Israel. Amongst them to be found; Professor Yona Ben Sasson, the Volozhin Rabbi's son, his brother Moshe Ben Sasson, who also made Aliya, was murdered by Arab terrorists in 1937 Bela Saliternik nee Kramnik took care of the Volozhin Shoah survivors who came in the late forties, she was their sister and mother alike, her home was their home; Mordekhay Malkin, my mother's brother, a pioneer-Haluts, his son Eytan born in Kibuts Givat Ada fell in Sinai on the Yom Kippur war. Amongst the deceased were those who survived the war in Siberia, where they were expelled in 1940 by the Soviets, after they occupied the shtetl and before the Nazi's conquered it. They made Aliya in 1947/8: Lea Nahshon nee Shiff; Miryam Levitan nee Rosenberg; Bat Shevah Wand Polak, our family neighbor/rival in Volozhin and best friend in Siberia. Deceased that did survive the war as partisans in the Volozhin forests and as soldiers in the Red Army: Yakov Kagan, Benyamin Kleinbord, Issaya Lavit. MAY THEY ALL REST IN PEACE Five years ago was the last year that we memorialized our Volozhin martyrs in public. The reason to this idleness was the rejoinder of our landesleit to the azkara invitations. We sought a solution and we found it at Eilat Gordin's multi shtetl site. We understood that we should create a multi shtetl forum, which would act in common. We were not obliged to create it. The forum existed. We asked to join and we joined the Radushkovits-Horodok common memorial ceremony. It is not the first time that congregations of Jews from between Vilna and Minsk shtetlakh supported each other. Dr Abraham Yablons tells in his article "Volozhiners in America" (Vol.Yizkor Book page 18) as follows: At the start of the Russian Jews emigration to America, the Volozhiners used to gather on Saturdays to assemble a Minyan for religion services. This arrangement continued until the first death of a landsman. Fifteen of Volozhin newcomers went together to arrange the burial, but they did not have burial grounds of their own. Therefore, they asked and obtained a grave from the Radoshkovitser congregation. It happened on the final day of Passover 1885, just 120 years ago. There was much of common between the Litwak congregations. Many weddings happened between bridegrooms and brides from neighboring towns. Many shtetl boys came to learn in Volozhin. I personally studied 8 years in Volozhin Hebrew Tarbut School. My teachers were from surrounding shtetls'. Yakov finger the Hebrew teacher came from Sol, Taller the Bible and religion teacher from Moltshad', Shlomo Baykalski the Polish language teacher from Zheludok, Yakov Lifshits the school manager- from Rakov, Fruma Gapanovitsh from Raduskovits. The Shtetl Jews used to live together they also were murdered together during the dreadful Holocaust. Yakov Lifshitz from Rakov married Fruma from Radoshkovits, their two daughters were born in Volozhin, Both of them Shoshanele 9 years old, Hayele at the age of 6 with their father and grandmother together were slaughtered in Horodok on July 9, 1942. The shtetls inhabitants lived and died together. They also fought the enemy together. Sheyna Lidski from Horodok wrote her poem to Leyzer Rogovin, the Soviet Union national hero in Yiddish (Volozhin Yizkor Book, page 667): I recall, Leyzer Rogovin, the rebellious hero, the partisan from Volozhin, You went on your fighting battle way, With the Horodok hero partisans Nazi trains to blow away Some words about Volozhin and its yeshiva When one hears Volozhin, he recalls the "Ets Hayim" (Tree of Life) Volozhin Yeshiva. Rabbi Hayim, the Volozhin born Rabbi with the shtetls Jews, according to the Vilna Gaon directions, founded and established a religious school. It became the most important Jewish academy of the nineteenth century. At its culmination, 400 yeshiva boys, the best talented youngsters of the Jewish world, studied within its walls. The Volozhin students became great scholars, Religious teachers, politician leaders, great Rabbis, poets and writers. A visitor to Israel will encounter many streets with names of Volozhin Yeshiva graduates like Hayim Nahman Bialik, Miha Berdichevski, Alter Droyanov, Itskhak Yakov Reiness, Harav Avraham Itshak Hkohen Koock, Aharon Harkabi, Shmuel Mohaliver, Zeev Visotski, Mordhay Nahmany and many others. The interested tourist will even find a street called "Volozhin Yeshiva"and a Kibbuts named Hanaziv (the famous Yeshiva head). He might also visit the Ramat Gan University bearing the name of the Volozhin born and its yeshiva student Meyir Bar Ilan ( nee Berlin). One of the most prominent students of the Ets Hayim Yeshivah was H. N. Bialik, our national poet. He wrote his "to the Bird" verses on a hill on the brook, we called it "the Bialik Mount". Volozhin was the topic of his poems "Hamatmid" and "Beit Hamidrash". Bialik was also the author of the "Slaughter City" It was written years later when Russian Soldiers murdered Jews at the "Pogrom" in Kishinev. I would like to cite there some words pronounced by the Shtetl's representative at the Volozhin Martyrs Memorial inauguration in Tel Aviv cemetery on May 1980. Close to Mount Bialik passed the dolorous way to anihilation, The poet never thought that the BET HAMIDRASH village, the town of To the Bird and HAMATMID, would become at its end The Slaughter City. On a wonderful blue sky day, Between our Freedom Holiday and the Festival of Torah Giving, The terrible, enormous, inhuman slaughter took place. When God called for spring and slaughter together, The sun was shining; the acacias were in bloom, And the butcher murdered. Expelled from the ghetto kennels, jammed, bleeding in the blacksmith's workshop, Humiliated, Beaten, injured, murdered and burned, the Jews of Volozhin went up in flames! The Killers were bestially satisfied, the local gentiles happy and drunk, The bells of the churches ringed, the harmonicas played when our parents, sisters, brothers and children went up in fire! They went up for ever! Our Volozhin descendants' organization in Israel was dedicated to memorize the 300 years existence of our congregation, a little Litwak shtetl amid the way from Vilna to Minsk, a little town with a great name. We gathered every year ever since the war end and until the end of the previous century to a memorial service in Tel Aviv. We installed a memorial plate inside the Shoah Cellar on the Zion Mount in Jerusalem, 45 years ago. We wrote and issued the 700 pages volume of Volozhin Yizkor Book, 35 Years ago. We erected a Volozhin memorial on the Tel Aviv Cemetery. Also during the last 5 years, we did not stop our efforts to memorize Volozhin, its Yeshiva and its people, its life and complete destruction. We did this work with the help of a few Israeli Volozhiners, without any help from Volozhin descendants abroad.  We produced in Israel and sent to Volozhin a three-language memorial plaque for the Yeshiva "Ets Hayim". The town authorities installed the plaque at the Yeahiva entry after the infamous "Kulinaria" sign was removed.  We ordered a stone memorial with texts in Hebrew, English and Russian to memorize the holy Volozhin Martyrs. It was installed on the shtetl's ancient cemetery top overlooking six common graves and the Mass Slaughter Site where the fascists murdered 2000 Jews on May 10 1942.  We translated from Hebrew/Yiddish/Russian to English a significant part of the Volozhin Yizkor book. We posed it on line at the Jewish-Gen and at Eilat Gordin Levitan sites. http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/volozhin/volozhin.html http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/  We concentrated the material in a 300-page book and sent copies to Yad Vashem in Jerusalem and to the United States Holocaust Museum in Washington. We did a lot, but not enough. The main purpose for the remaining handful of Shoah survivors' shtetl descendants is to plant the shtetls history, its life and inhuman destruction in the heart of our children. Seeing many representatives of our second and third generation, we believe that it is possible. So let do it. We wish you all a Kosher, quiet, healthy and joyful Passover.
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- Thursday, April 21, 2005 at 10:45:13 (EDT)
Unfortunately I will not be able to attend the meeting on April 3rd. However, being a descendent from both Volozhin and Rakov I am very interested in what will be presented. Do you know if any of that meeting would be video taped or available following the meeting? Is there a way to submit my family information, in the form of names or even postcards and photos to be included? Any information you can provide would be most appreciated. If there is a website with this information on it, I would gladly pursue that avenue as well. On another note, forgive me for not thanking you long ago for all of your hard and wonderful work. From your efforts, I have the greatest success story. As a result of your website I have now connected with three branches of my family including family names Meltzer, Botwinik, Rolnik and Grinhauz, and new family locations including Delaware, Texas, Israel and Argentina. From a posting to your website searching for the relatives of Alexander and Rose Meltzer some years ago, I received a telephone call last June which resulted in my meeting a man by the name of Marty Meltzer from Delaware. Being from Kansas City myself, we agreed to meet in Washington DC last summer while I was on business. We met at my hotel and accompanying him was his daughter. We both came with whatever photos we could muster from relatives. From stories told many years ago, by relatives who passed away long ago, we sat at a table and initially exchanged stories and names. We then pulled out photos and began matching them with names. It was wonderful. It was beautiful. It was life giving. Since that time, we have kept in touch and are talking about a mutual trip to Belarus in the future. I have met Marty's cousins in Texas and we have found additional materials including a transcribed interview with one of the older generation. Eilat, thank you. Even with EllisIsland.org and JewishGen.org, I don't believe I would have achieved any of this without eilatgordinlevitan.com! Thank you again. Best regards, Eddie Meltzer Kansas City, Missouri Researching Meltzer - Volozhin, Rakow Botwinik - Rakow, Belarus Malamud - Telnescht, Romania/Moldavia Milszpaj/Jakubowicz - Radoszyce, Poland
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- Sunday, April 03, 2005 at 10:31:40 (EDT)
Steven Davidoff (sdavidof@isbmex.com)--------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: Comment Dear Sirs, navigating through internet, in search for family roots, I stumbled across your incredible page. I am of the lucky survivors of the Axelrod and Shapiro family that survived the holocaust, thanks to the initiative of our grandparents that emigrated to Mexico. When I entered the List of Holocaust victims page, I was stunned to find, the names of all my cousins, and mine, mentioned there. Shlomo(after whom I am named), my cousin Ruthy, whos name is Chaya Risha, my cousins name,Ruben, after Yerachmiel. I don´t know who did all this compilation, but it is seems to me that the work and time invested here is infinite. I have pictures of some of my family mentioned in your page that I would like to scan and add to this effort to remember the past, and keep our families alive in our memories. Please tell me how to get in touch with you, and how to support your effort for this work. Steven Davidoff Axelrod
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- Saturday, March 12, 2005 at 12:43:27 (EST)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Robert D.Walosin (walosir@yahoo.com) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: Comment Message: I am a Walosin. Would like to know more about my last name.
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- Saturday, March 12, 2005 at 12:41:38 (EST)
Robert D.Walosin (walosir@yahoo.com) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- I am a Walosin. Would like to know more about my last name.
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- Monday, March 07, 2005 at 00:35:49 (EST)
Steve Orlen (sorlen@email.arizona.edu) on Thursday, March 03, 2005 at 14:11:02 --------------------------------------------------------------------------- This is a richly textured and wonderful site, a memorial to the town and to our Jewish ancestors who lived there and to those who died there.
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- Friday, March 04, 2005 at 18:10:04 (EST)
Makowskis@aol.com to Belarus ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Looking for information about my great grandmother Esther AXELROD. She was married to Harry ROGOFF (Tvi Hirsh ROGWIN or ROGOVIN) - Harry came from Volyzhin but I do not believe that Esther Axelrod did. They married and had 5 children (Rosie, Julie, Isadore/Edward and Sarah) before they came to the US. They settled in Cleveland. Her daughter Sarah married her cousin Isadore Axelrod. Other Axelrod relatives lived in Akron. Esther and 2 of her daughters died in the flu epidemic of 1918. I am unable to find any records of exactly where she was from and who her parents and siblings were. Sheri Makowski Potomac, MD
Sheri Makowski <Makowskis@aol.com>
USA - Thursday, March 03, 2005 at 18:03:49 (EST)
I'm writing a PhD on Dr. YAAKOV (JACOB) ROBINSON and the Institute of Jewish Affairs (which he founded) at the Simon-Dubnow-Institute for Jewish History and Culture in Leipzig, Germany (www.dubnow.de). I'm looking for any information concerning family, biography, work of JACOB ROBINSON. He was born in SEREJ (SEIRIJAI) in 1889. His father's name was DAVID. He had at least five brothers: AARON, ABRAHAM, NATHAN, NEHEMIAH and PINCUS ROBINSON. NEHEMIAH and NATHAN were both born in VISHTINETZ (VISTYTIS), the former in 1898, the latter in 1904. Just like his brother YAAKOV, NEHEMIAH became a great international lawyer, director of the Institue of Jewish Affairs and drafter of the Reparations Agreements between Germany and Israel and between Germany and the Conference on Jewish Material Claims. NATHAN ROBINSON was a very prominent physicist and director of the Solar Laboratory at the Haifa Technion. Both NEHEMIAH and NATHAN ROBINSON died in 1964. About the other brothers I haven't been able to gather any additional information There is very little material on YAAKOV ROBINSON's life. Short entries in different Jewish Encyclopedias; some information in "Yahadut Lita" - one of whose editors he himself was - and in the Yiddish "Lite". I spent several weeks in the American Jewish Archives in Cincinnati, where I found considerable material on YAAKOV ROBINSON's activities as director of the Institute of Jewish Affairs. I was at the Yad Vashem Archives and at the Central Zionist Archives in Jerusalem. But I haven't found any relevant information on ROBINSON's background, his parents, his family, his childhood, his youth, his activities in the 1930s (when he in a sense disappeared from the international stage), his arrival to the US etc. YAAKOV ROBINSON had married CLARA KATZ (1897-1976). They had two daughters: ATHALIE (born 1925) and VITA (1928-1955). ATHALIE ROBINSON lives in NYC, is not healthy and for some reason doesn't want to talk to anyone about her father. I'd be immensely grateful for any pieces of information on YAAKOV ROBINSON, his parents, his family, his activities etc. Yours sincerely, Omry K. Feuereisen, ok@nebt.org, feuereisen@dubnow.de, Berlin/Leipzig, Germany.
Omry K. Feuereisen <feuereisen@dubnow.de>
- Thursday, February 24, 2005 at 14:50:42 (EST)
The Yatzkan family from Vabolnik/ Vashki in Lithuania. Children of Feive (Shraga) Yatzkan and Reise Liba in America; .Minnie Yatzkan and Luis Miller- Children; 1 Kessy and Carol Miller 2. Philip and Eunice Miller 3. Danny and Rose Miller 4. Miriam and Nate Schiller ( children;1. Benjie- Ellen- Lester Bronstein- Liba2. Steven and Eddie Shiller) Ester Yatzkan and Charles Levine - Children; 1. Danny and Shirly Levine 2. Florence and Gerorge Drimmer Tillie Yatzkan and Gershon Smith - Children; 1. Dotty and jacob Baker 2. Paul and Hilda Smith 3. Shirly and Wally Dix 4. Sidney and Matilda Smith Anna (Chana) Yatzkan and Nathan Sheinm(?)- Children; 1. Philip and Debby Sheinm(?) 2. Debby and Martin Druckerman Sam Yatzkan Joe Yatzkan Children of Feive ( Shraga) and Reize Liba Yatzkan in Israel; Avraham Yatzkan - Children 1. Shoshana nee Yatzkan Marnin, born 1928 in Tel Aviv Cheina Yatzkan and Yerachmiel Hofenberg children; 1. Shoshana Reize born in Tel Aviv in 1923 3. Shraga Hofenberg born in Tel Aviv in 1927 Zelda Yatzkan and Children; 1. Ahuva ( Liba) Henis Yosef Mendel and Fruma Yatzkan- Children who perished during the holocaust in Lithuania; Cheina Kushnir nee Yatzkan was born in Subacius, Lithuania in 1906 1. daughter Sonia ( born 1924) survived lives in Kibbutz Mizra, holocaust survivor- 2. her sister perished at age 10 3.her youngest brother ( born 1934) survived and lives in London. Moshe Yatzkan born in Vabolnik Avraham Yatzkan born in Vabolnik (wife Masha) 1. one child survived- Meir Yatzkan was born in Subacius Yosef Mendel and Fruma Yatzkan- Children who came to Israel; Yehudit Yatzkan came to Israel and lived in Kfar Varburg. she had two sons who might be still in Kfar Varburg. Masha Yatzkan born c 1905 in Vabolnik - Her husband Yaakov Slavin ( also born in Vabolnik) is 100 years old and he lives in Jerusalem children; 1. Shimon Slavin M.D. 2. Daughter Shmuel Yaakov Yatzkan and Rivka Bloch children; 1. Ada (Hadasa) was the eldest born c 1900, passed away lately in her 100 year in Paris 2. Yadwiga was the 2nd and died in 78 near Paris 3., Oma, their third daughter perished during the war in Warsaw ghetto. The mother Rebecca was also lost in the Warsaw 4.. Rachel and her son Yves made a trip to Israel. They both made painted scarves and ties. They were living in Paris were Rachel had studied medecine in the pre-war period. Rachel died in 98 and Yves died recently. They both were named Jackan 5. Tchyjo Kendall , his last and youngest daughter, was born in 1919 shet died in 2004. Some time in May of 2005 an exhibition of her paintings will take place in Paris were she had been living since the 50ties
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- Monday, February 21, 2005 at 14:57:33 (EST)
Today I called Yerachmiel Dori in Tel Aviv. Yerachmiel is the son of Badana nee Pintov and Yaakov (Dostrovski) Dori (1899-1973) Yaakov was the first Chief-of-Staff of the Israel Defense Force (IDF). Badana nee Pintov was the daughter of Kaila nee Spektor ( 1880- 1950) and Yehuda Leib Pintov ( 1880- 1960) of Kurenets. Badana was born in Kurenets in 1905. She had two younger brothers; Zalman and Shlomo and a sister; Ester. Badana studied in Vilna and became a teacher in Kurenets in 1924. in 1925 the brother ( half brother, same mother different fathers) of Kaila (nee Spektor) pintov; Max (Elimelech) Shulman came for a visit to Kurenets from Boston. In America Max became very well off (real estate) He came with large sums of many and established many public enterprises in Kurenets.He build a new, non Hasidim synagogue and obtained a building for the Tarbut school. He also paid for his sister and her family trip to Eretz Israel. The family left Kurenets in 1925. Badana married Yaakov in 1929 and Yerachmiel was born in 1931. A few years ago, Yerachmiel visited Kurenets and Vilna. He keeps in touch with Aharon Meirovitz, the more then 90 years old editor of the Kurenets Yizkor book. He also keeps in touch with some of the many relative of the Shulman and Pintov family who came to America. His grandfather had a brother; Eliyau Pintov, who changed his name to Eli Fin. His grandmothers brother; Max Shulman had a son Theodor Shulman who now lives in Florida. There were also; Yoel Shulman and Eliott Shulman who lived in Boston. Yaakov Dori Born in Odesa, Russia, his family emigrated to Palestine following the anti-Jewish pogrom in Odessa in 1905. Upon completing high school at the Reali School in Haifa, he enlisted in the Jewish Legion of the British Army during World War I. He later joined the Haganah and adopted the underground name of "Dan." In 1939, Dori was appointed Chief-of-Staff of the Haganah, a position he held until 1946. From 1946 to 1947 he also headed the Palestinian Jewish delegation sent to purchase arms in the United States. When the IDF was formed, Dori took over as its first Chief-of-Staff. Yet, despite his command and organizational skills, he was already suffering from failing health, and had difficulty commanding his troops during Israel's War of Independence, and was forced to rely heavily on his deputy, Yigael Yadin. He completed his term as Chief-of-Staff on November 9, 1949 and retired from the military. He was succeeded by his deputy, Yadin. Even after his release from the army, however, he continued to wear the officer's pin he was awarded when he first became a second lieutenant. Upon leaving the IDF, Dori was appointed Chairman of the Science Council, attached to the Prime Minister's Office. He was later made President of the Technion in Haifa, a position he held until 1965. His son, Yerachmiel Dori, served as commander of the IDF's Engineering Corps For Picture of Badana Pintov Dori; http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pix/mementos/mt22_5_big.jpg
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pix/mementos/mt22_5_big.jpg
- Sunday, February 20, 2005 at 23:54:41 (EST)
Having just stumbled onto your website, I want to compliment you and let you know how impressed I am with your effort. I have been active with Jewish Gen since it's inception and have been a constant supporter of the various undertakings that have occured. I have visited Lithuania in 1992 and 1994 and have much to relate about my discoveries. My mother, Guta Lea Lenzner, was born in Musnik and my father, Isaac Koberzuch, came from Marijampole and Rasaniai. I hope to come back to this site and read more of it's content than I have time to do now. Thank you for making such excellent effort available without onsisting on a donation before making your information available. milton@sciti.com Milton Blackstone La Jolla, CA
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USA - Sunday, February 20, 2005 at 13:03:14 (EST)
From the Yizkor book for Glubokie; ...In the midst of so much cruelty, we must mention the goodness of the brothers Stankevitsh, Marian and Adolf, from Barsutshine, who aided Jews in their time of trouble. They helped them hide from the German murderers, fed them, and showed them where to flee and hide. With great praise a person named , must be mentioned. He lived in that neighborhood. Statzevitsh simply sacrificed himself in order to rescue Jews. Knowing that at Statzevitsh they could find a refuge, Jews came to him from all over. He hid them wherever he was able - in the shops, in the barns, in the attics and even with his acquaintances, who he was able to trust. He would feed not only those who turned to him, but he would also carry food into the forest into the corn fields, any place he knew where they were hiding. Many Jews, thanks to him, were saved at the time. This most generous man, savior of Jews, Statzevitsh, became too popular in the region, as a protector of Jews, and that wasn't good. As was mentioned, the vast majority of peasants in the region, helped the Germans in their extermination of Jews. And because of this, the local well-known peasants, decided to get Statzevitsh out of the way. These "good neighbors" discovering that seven Jews are hidden in Statzevitsh's bath, and two more in his attic. They traveled to Sharkavshtzine and told the Police there. The Police, accompanied by the Gendarmes, immediately came to the scene of the "crime", and set fire to the bath-house on all sides. the seven hidden Jews were burned alive, it was so horrible, no one was able to identify their bones. They also went to Statzevitsh's house, looking for Jews. Statzevitsh, whose name must truly be engraved in the memoirs of our bloody pages with golden letters, displayed an extraordinary moral character and self-sacrifice. Instead of fleeing from the murderers, to save himself, he occupied himself with saving those Jews whom he had hidden. He speedily let them out of the windows, and he himself, unfortunately, was captured by the bandits. They led him away to Glubokie, where he was shot.....
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- Saturday, February 19, 2005 at 16:55:14 (EST)
On Friday, 16 of December 2004, two boys from Belarus (Pastavy and Furki) arrived at our house, for 8 weeks stay with our family. The reason the boys stayed with us, is the health of the boys. On Friday, 11 February, 2005 they left our home. Thats why I am interested in a contact in Belarus that can write English. (my Russian isn't that good, I cant write Russian) If you like , it could be nice to send emails to each other some times .----- With friendly regards, Koert Thalen kthalen@planet.nl
Koert Thalen <kthalen@planet.nl>
Holland - Friday, February 18, 2005 at 10:55:26 (EST)
I am Laura Steiman from Rosario city, Argentina. I am looking for more information about my four grandparents that came here 1912 and 1920. In their Argentine documents there are wrong or missing information. I have just the death papers and a marriage documents of Argentina and their Number of Indentity documents (NO passsport!!) after their arrival. At this moment in the documents just said RUSSIAN citizenship. From my mother: David Bendersky, born in Ribniza in 1896, near of Dnieper river, son of Modje Bendersky and Feige Strilky. Married in Argentina with Celia Israelevich, born in Minsk in 1901, daugther of Elena Golob or Goloff and Moises Israelevich.From my father; Salomon Steiman, born in Bersuenata (Russia) in 1901. son of Isaac Steiman and Ana Mastinsky. Married in Argentina with Fanny Guendler, born in Ukrania (Odessa??) in 1902 daughter of Lea Svatetz and Isaac Guendler. All died in Argentina, Rosario city. ------------------------ I am looking for more accuracy in my genealogical tree dates, in order to know about my roots and start "some" citizenship. I made a reserchh at the CEMLA (Centers of Inmigrants in Latin America) I did not find any passenger information in their database of my ancestors. Please let my know if you can help or advice me in this hard research. Thank you. Laura Steiman kalak@ciudad.com.ar
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- Thursday, February 17, 2005 at 18:13:13 (EST)
Today I talked with Yakov Slavin in Jerusalem. Yaakov was born a 100 years ago in Vabolnik, Lithuania. He is the son of Shimon Slavin and he had one brother who perished in the Holocaust. His wife was Masha nee Yazkan, the daughter of Yosef Mendel Yatzkan. She was also born in Vabolnilk. Yosef Mendel Yatzkan was the brother of Shmuel Yaakov Yatzkan the publisher of the Haynt (born in Vabalnikas in 1874, died in Paris in 1936)Shmuel Yaakov Yatzkan and wife ; Rivka nee Bloch ( a dentist) had five daughters. The middle daughter; Oma, perished in the holocaust with her mother, Rivka. The four other daughters lived and died in Paris.1. Ada (Hadasa) was the eldest born c 1900, passed away lately in her 100 year in Paris----- 2. Yadwiga was the 2nd and died in 1978 near Paris----- 3. Oma---- 4.Rachel and her son Yves made a trip to Israel. They both made painted scarves and ties. They were living in Paris were Rachel had studied medicine in the pre-war period. Rachel died in 1998 and Yves Jackan died recently. ---------------- 5. Tchyjo Kendall , his last and youngest daughter, was born in 1919 she died in 2004. Some time in May of 2005 an exhibition of her paintings will take place in Paris were she had been living since the 50ties-------------- Another well known person who came from Vabolnik was Rabbi Shach ( his mother was Bat Sheva nee Levitan) Yaakov knew the family very well. Yaakov said that his wife Masha had a sister; Chyena ( Kushnir) who perished in the holocaust. her daughter; Sonia Lahav lives in Kibbutz Mizra, A sister Yehudit, lived in Kfar Varburg, Israel ( had two sons) Children of Yosef and Fruma Yatzkan from the Yad Vashem report Cheina Kushnir nee Yatzkan was born in Subacius, Lithuania in 1906 daughter Sonia survived as well as a son who now lives in London (daughter perished at age 10) 2. Moshe Yatzkan born in Vabolnik 3. Avraham Yatzkan born in Vabolnik ( wife Masha , one child Children of Feive Ytzkan ( a brother to Yosef Mendel and Shmuel Yaakov Ytzkan); > 1. Avraham Yazkan came to Israel in 1923 (father of Shoshana Mernin born > 1928) > 2. Cheina married Yerachmiel Hofenberg and came to Israel. had > Shoshana in 1924 and Shraga in 1927 > 3. Zelda Shulman Yazkan came to Israel in 1922 she had a daughter Ahuva ( born 1928 who married Prof. Yigal Henis. They live in Rehovot, Israel. They have two sons ( one named Ilan) > 4. Tuvia or Tevel Yatzkan came to Chicago and had a son that was > killed in the Korean war > 5. Chana Yatzkan came to America she had children that met Shraga and > Shoshana > 6. Taube? Yatzkan came to America she had children that met Shraga and > Shoshana > 7. daughter Yatzkan came to America > 8. daughter Yatzkan came to America (maybe last name Shmidt) > 9. son Yatzkan came to America never married >-------------------------------------------- > HaRav Elozor Menachem Mann Shach ztvk"l--- HaRav Shach was born to Rav Ezriel zt"l and Bat Sheva of the Levitan family, a family of talmidei chachomim who served as rabbonim in important Lithuanian communities. Her brother was HaRav Nisan Levitan zt"l, who became one of the most senior figures in Agudas HaRabbonim of America. HaRav Shach was born in Vabolnik, Lithuania on erev Rosh Chodesh Shvat 5655 (1895) .... "I remember how I was educated in my parents' home: when my yarmulke fell off my head, I was taught that you had to cry from distress. They were guided by a concern for the punctilious observance of mitzvos. Once I woke up after the zman Krias Shema according to the Mogen Avrohom and I burst out crying and continued to cry about it all day long."... Although there was a yeshiva ketana in his hometown, he begged his parents to let him go to Ponevezh Yeshiva in order to fulfill the directive, "Exile yourself to a place of Torah." When they saw how persistent he was they agreed to his request, and he set out for Ponevezh Yeshiva. He was never to see his parents again. He pursued his studies diligently together with the other talmidim. His great rov was HaRav Itzele Blazer zt"l and he also had the merit of sleeping in the Ba'al Hamitzvos' House. Already in his youth those characteristics, which were to make him admired by the whole Jewish world, stood out: his amazing hasmodoh, wonderful talents, a shining mussar personality, respect for his fellow man, and a cheerful countenance. He acquired his learning during his youth from Slobodka Yeshiva in Lithuania, where he quickly became one of its outstanding students. During the years 5673-74 (1913-14) he absorbed Torah and mussar from his great rov, the Alter of Slobodka, HaRav Nosson Zvi Finkel zt"l, from his son- in-law, HaRav Yitzchok Eisik Sher zt"l and HaRav Moshe Mordechai Epstein zt"l. Throughout his life HaRav Shach considered himself to be a talmid of Slobodka and he often praised that great institution of Torah and mussar. Once he said that all the Torah in Eretz Yisroel and America today originates from Slobodka, the "mother of Yeshivas," for all the roshei yeshiva of the last generation learned there. The Slobodka mussar outlook and the Alter's approach to the depths of ma'amorei Chazal guided the Rosh Yeshiva in his avodas Hashem in general and in his mussar shmuessen in particular. In 5614 (1914) HaRav Shach was forced to leave Slobodka due to the outbreak of war and he returned to his hometown of Vabolnik, where he joined the yeshiva of HaRav Yechezkel Bernstein zt"l, the author of the Divrei Yechezkel, who had opened a yeshiva in the town in which his father- in-law lived..... Rav Shach writes about this period in the introduction to the new Avi Ezri edition published in 5753 (1993): "How can I repay Hashem for all His mercies? Starting from the days of my youth, when I went through periods when I had nothing at all. I cannot adequately describe this period from the beginning of the First World War in 5674 (1914) when all the Jews were exiled from the Lithuanian towns and I did not know where my parents were, for I was alone in Slutsk and I had no contact with them. That was how I spent several years, suffering much." The Rosh Yeshiva spent these years fleeing the terrors of the First World War. He wandered from town to town, but fulfilled the posuk, "Had Your Torah not been my delight, I should then have perished in my affliction." He learned in shuls and botei medrash, washing his face, hands and feet in the sinks at the entrance of the botei medrash. Every fiber of his being was immersed only in Torah, and he could say about himself, "The Torah which I learned in the period of wrath, endured." ....... After a while HaRav Shach joined the HaRav Isser Zalman Meltzer zt"l who had founded a yeshiva in Slutsk in 5657 (1897). He developed a close relationship with HaRav Isser Zalman, whom he considered his rov with respect to everything, and he had the merit of absorbing Torah from HaRav Isser Zalman in his house in Slutsk. ....... In the introduction to his great work Avi Ezri on Haflo'o-Zeroim HaRav Shach writes: "It is my duty to mention my uncle, HaRav Isser Zalman Meltzer ztv"l and my aunt . . . who were like parents to me already in my youth . . . I received much from them, and whatever is mine -- is from them."..... Throughout his life HaRav Shach related to his uncle HaRav Isser Zalman like a son to a father and a talmid to his eminent rov. In his shiurim he often cites divrei Torah of Rav Isser Zalman on sugyos of Shas. In a letter on the occasion of the establishment of Even Ho'ezel Yeshiva in Netivot, HaRav Shach wrote, "Rav Isser Zalman disseminated Torah throughout his life, and I, although unworthy of it, had the merit of becoming close to him and he taught me like a father teaches a son.".... ..... .Rav Isser Zalman also treated HaRav Shach like his son, remaining very attached to him throughout his life and showering him with an abundance of Torah and yir'oh. Rav Isser Zalman praised Rav Shach's chiddushei Torah greatly, and due to his great admiration of them he published some in his book Even Ho'ezel. Rav Isser Zalman also encouraged the Rosh Yeshiva to publish his sefer Avi Ezri. When Rav Shach was about to publish his first sefer in 5708 (1948) there was a shortage of paper because of the war and Rav Isser Zalman took pains to obtain sufficient paper for the printing of the book. ..... On 16th Av 5683 (1923) HaRav Shach was engaged to Rav Isser Zalman's niece, Guttel, the daughter of Rav Ben-Zion Gilmovsky z"l, who was a descendant of the Ponim Meiros. The book Shimusho shel Torah contains her lineage as recorded by Rav Isser Zalman. They were married between Yom Kippur and Succos 5684 (1923), Rav Isser Zalman being mesader kiddushin. Over the years the Rosh Yeshiva would speak about the Rebbetzin's mesirus nefesh, which allowed him to toil in Torah undisturbed. She took upon herself the yoke of supporting the family, working as a pharmacist in the town. "After my marriage too I would travel [to yeshiva to learn] from Pesach to Succos and from Succos to Pesach to devote myself undisturbed to my studies, and my whole Torah is to be credited to her." For five consecutive years he devoted himself to his studies with amazing hasmodoh acquiring a mastery of all parts of the Torah. His soul yearned for Torah, and during those years he overwhelmed his inclination and purified his body, submitting it totally to Torah with his elevated yiras Shomayim. He did not cease his studies day or night; he did not take leave of his books or interrupt his studies. He afflicted his body and purified his soul until he had acquired a vast knowledge of the Talmudic waters. In 5789 (1929) he was asked by HaRav Aharon Kotler zt"l to assist him by becoming a maggid shiur in Kletsk Yeshiva. He disseminated Torah there for five years, leaving his mark on many talmidei chachomim. During this period he developed a close relationship with HaRav Yechezkel Levenstein zt"l, the future mashgiach of Ponevezh, who was the mashgiach of Kletsk at the time. At this time HaRav Shach was asked by the Brisker Rov to accept the position of rosh yeshiva of Toras Chaim in Brisk to replace the Imrei Moshe, HaRav Moshe Soloveitchik, but for various reasons HaRav Shach did not take up this position. After the sudden passing of HaRav Meir Shapira zt"l on 7th Cheshvan 5694 (1933), HaRav Shach was asked by Rav Chaim Ozer Grodzensky zt"l to become the rosh yeshiva of Lublin and he stayed there for a while. He then served as maggid shiur in Novardok Yeshiva, where he taught Torah to young students for two years. In a letter written by HaRav Aharon Kotler to HaRav Chaim Ozer Grodzensky he asks Rav Chaim Ozer "to use his influence to support Novardok Yeshiva since my relative, the Gaon Rav Eliezer Shach shlita joined the yeshiva as a maggid shiur, and I have it on reliable information from members of that Yeshiva that the learning is on a superior level especially now that my above relative has been accepted there, for he is great in Torah and influencing others in Torah . . . " In 5696 (1936) the Rosh Yeshiva became a maggid shiur in Karlin Yeshiva in Luninetz, which was headed by the Rebbe Rav Avrohom Elimelech Perlow zt"l. For the entire article go to; ........http://chareidi.shemayisrael.com/archives5762/chayesara/CS62aravshachbio.htm
http://chareidi.shemayisrael.com/archives5762/chayesara/CS62aravshachbio.htm
- Thursday, February 17, 2005 at 14:35:03 (EST)
Message: I tried to contact Stanley Levine, but som spamkillerprogram wont let me trough, so I continue writing here.Dear Stanley please contact me ,Perhaps we are family I have Lewin and Brown between my ancesters.all the best from Pheya Yair. Pheya@actcom.co.il
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- Thursday, February 17, 2005 at 01:52:06 (EST)
Message: My last name is Creeger. My grandfather was Shmuel Kriger from Krekenava, Lithuania. He arrived in Baltimore in 1904 with his brother Louie. I believe we are probably related in some way. Very interesting site. -- Mache Creeger mache@creeger.com
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- Thursday, February 17, 2005 at 01:48:35 (EST)
Yafe Ber* Ber Yafe was born in Poland in 1890 to Nakhman and Tzipora. He was a merchant. During the war was in Dolhinow, Poland. Ber died in 1942 in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his sister Briena Katz in Kibbutz Dafna ---------------------------------------------------------- Lea Yafe was born in Poland in 1900 to Zalman and Chaia. She was a housewife and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war was in Dolhinow, Poland. Lea died in 1942 in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her sister-in-law Briena Katz in Kibbutz Dafna ---------------------------------------------------------- Presman Nakhum Nakhum Presman was born in Dolhinov, Poland in 1892 to Yermiyahu and Chyena. He was a glazier and married to Eshka nee yafe. Prior to WWII he lived in Dolhinov, Poland. During the war was in Dolhinov, Poland. Nakhum died in 1942 in Dolhinov, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 13/05/1955 by his sister in law Briena Katz in Kibbutz Dafna ---------------------------------------------------------- Presman Eshka* Eshka Presman nee Yafe was born in Tsupre, Poland in 1883 to Nakhman and Tzipora. She was a housewife and married. During the war was in Dolhinow, Poland. Eshka died in 1942 in Dolhinow. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 13/05/1955 by her sister. Briena Katz in Kibbutz Dafna ---------------------------------------------------------- Pesia Sosenski nee Katz was born in Slubica, Poland in 1900 to Yehuda and Briena . She was a seamstress and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Gleboka, Poland. During the war was in Gleboka, Poland. Pesia died in 1943 in Gleboka, Poland with her 3 years old daughter; Eidit. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1956 by her mother Briena Katz in Kibbutz Dafna ---------------- Lea Yafe was born in Poland in 1900. She was a housewife and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war was in Dolhinow, Poland. Lea died in 1942 in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her sister-in-law Briena Katz in Kibbutz Dafna.------------------------ Presman Khaim Khaim Presman was born in Dolhinov, Poland in 1912 to Nakhum and Eshka. He was a glazier and married to Rakhel Dimenshtein. Prior to WWII he lived in Dolhinov, Poland and was a glass maker. During the war was in Dolhinov, Poland. Khaim died in 1942 in Dolhinov, Poland with 1 year old daughter Mushka. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 13/05/1955 by his aunt Briena Katz in Kibbutz Dafna--------------------------------- Presman Rakhel Rakhel Presman was born in Dolhinov, Poland in 1922 to Moshe and Sara Dimenstein. She was a housewife and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinov, Poland. During the war was in Dolhinov, Poland. Rakhel died in 1942 in Dolhinov, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 13/05/1955 by her aunt Briena Katz in Kibbutz Dafna ---------------------------------------------------------- Perlmuter Yerakhmiel Yerakhmiel Perlmuter was born in Dolhinow, Poland in 1892 to Arie Leib and Reyzel. He was a merchant and married to Ester nee Katz. During the war was in Dolhinow, Poland. Yerakhmiel died in 1942 in Dolhinow, Poland With son Arie Leib age 15 and daughter; Zipora age 7 . This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his mother-in-law Briena Katz in Kibbutz Dafna ---------------------------------------------------------- Ester Perlmuter nee Katz was born in 1902 in Sloboda to Yehuda and Breina. She was a seamstress and married to Yerachmiel. Ester died in 1942 in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her mother; Briena Katz in Kibbutz Dafna ---------------------------------------------------------- Khevlin* Nakhman Nakhman Khevlin was born in Dolginov, Poland in 1923 to Arie Leib and Besha. During the war was in Lesniki, Poland as a partisan. Nakhman died in 1942 in Lesniki, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1955 by his grandmother Briena Katz in Kibbutz Dafna ---------------------------------------------------------- Markman Laja Laja Markman nee Khevlin was born in Dolhinov, Poland in 1897 to Moshe and Rivka. She was a housewife and married to Mendel. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinov, Poland. During the war was in Dolhinov, Poland. Laja died in 1942 in Dolhinov, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 14/01/1957 by her relative Bracha Gitelzon---------------------------------------- Markman Mendl Mendl Markman was born in Dolhinov, Poland in 1894. He was a grain merchant and married to Lea. Prior to WWII he lived in Dolhinov, Poland. During the war was in Dolhinov, Poland. Mendl died in 1942 in Dolhinov, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 23/05/1957 by his acquaintance Sara Eizenberg ---------------------------------------- Liba Gitlic nee Katz was born to Dwosia and Mota. She was married to Aba. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinow, Poland. Liba died in 1942 in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/06/1999 by her niece Chaia Barzam, a Shoah survivor ---------------------------------------- Katz Gutman Gutman Katz was born in Dolhinow, Poland in 1915 to Avraham and Gela. He was a áåâø éùéáä. Prior to WWII he lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war was in Dolhinow, Poland. Gutman died in 1942 in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his cousin ---------------------------------------- Katz Masha Masha Katz nee Aigess was born in Dolhinov, Poland in 1903 to Mordekhai and Dvora. She was married to Zalman Katz and had two children ( Arie and Michal). Prior to WWII she lived in Gluboke, Poland. During the war was in Gluboke, Poland. Masha died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her sister Hadasa Gotlib Even Gvirol Street, Tel Aviv---------------------------------------- Frydman Chaja Chaja Frydman nee Katz was born in Dolinow, Poland in 1883 to Moshe. She was a housewife and married to Shmuel. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolinow, Poland. During the war was in Dolinow, Poland. Chaja died in 1942 in Dolinow, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 30/12/1956 by her son, Fridman Mordechai of Haifa, a Shoah survivor ---------------------------------------- Frydman Ester Ester Frydman nee Einbinder was born in Dolhinow, Poland in 1907. She was a housewife and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war was in Dolhinow, Poland. Ester died in 1942 in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 30/12/1956 by Mordekhai Fridman ---------------------------------------- Blinder Abraham Abraham Blinder was born in Kurzeniec, Poland in 1908. He was a tailor and married to Bluma nee Fridman. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Abraham died in 1942 in Kurzeniec, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 30/12/1956 by his brother in law; Mordekhai Fridman ---------------------------------------- Blinder Bluma Bluma Blinder nee Fridman was born in Dolhinow, Poland in 1910 to Shmuel and Khaia. She was a housewife and married to Fridman. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Bluma died in 1942 in Kurzeniec, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1957 by her brother; Mordekhai Fridman ---------------------------------------- Rubin Cywja Cywja Rubin was born in Dolhinow, Poland in 1909. She was a housewife and married to Pinkhas. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war was in Dolhinow, Poland. Cywja died in 1942 in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 30/12/1956 by her relative ---------------------------------------- Rubin Gitel Gitel Rubin was born in Dolhinow, Poland in 1880. She was a housewife and married to Avraham. Prior to WWII she lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war was in Dolhinow, Poland. Gitel died in 1942 in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 30/12/1956 by Mordekhai Fridman ---------------------------------------- Shachne Rubin was born in Dolhinow, Poland in 1911 to Avraham and Gitel. He was a tailor and single. Prior to WWII he lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war was in Dolhinow, Poland. Shachne died in 1942 in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 31/12/1956 by his relative ----------------------------------------
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- Thursday, February 17, 2005 at 01:38:08 (EST)
Dayna Chalif (zoeys_mom@yahoo.com) 43 --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Dear Eilat and everyone who has contributed to this site, THANK YOU!!! i just found out today what my grandfather's original surname was (LEMELMAN) and that he and his family were from Olshansky. PLEASE, can somebody post translations of the Hebrew subtext under the wonderful pictures on this site?? And if anyone has information on ISREAL (great grandfather), ELIAH (grandfather), NACHUM (father), NATAN (son) LEMELMAN or ELIAH RABINOWITZ, ROSE KAPLAN (his wife), CHASHA & JACOB RABINOWITZ (their children), also HANNAH LEMELMAN KOSLOWSKY (w/o ISAAC) and BENJAMIN LEMELMAN and wife BAYLA. please email me. thanks again!!
Dayna Chalif <zoeys_mom@yahoo.com>
USA - Tuesday, February 15, 2005 at 20:52:13 (EST)
Carlton Brooks (carltonb@carltonbrooks.net) In the OLD GUEST BOOK I found a message that I would like to follow up on but I do not know who the sender was. If you search for the following text .... (One of these, Louis/Leybl RAPAPORT, b. in SMORGON, changed his surname to ETSCOVITZ.) .... Can someone tell me who sent the original message. I am related to the ETSCOVITZ family. Elka (Mrs Yitzchok) RAPAPORT (prob d. young in KRASNE) The RAPAPORTs in BANGOR,MAINE are probably related to Elka's HUSBAND, & NOT to Elka.) (One of these, Louis/Leybl RAPAPORT, b. in SMORGON, changed his surname to ETSCOVITZ.) I would like to find out who posted it so that I can track down the Etscovitz and Rapaport family
Carlton Brooks <carltonb@carltonbrooks.net>
USA - Tuesday, February 15, 2005 at 20:44:05 (EST)
Hello, I encountered by coincidence your site. I make here an entry, in hope that you help me koennen. In Moloddeczno my family on the paternal side came from beginning of the 20's to end . I unfortunately none Russian , my English is moderate school English, I must use for translator side interest whether you couldstill, find whether in the region Molodeczno live /Vilna/Minsk member of the families Balinski and/or Ryndcziewicz, above all a great aunt of me live in the area Molodeczno /Minsk . Their name is born Viktoria born Ryndcziewicz, around 1895? in Vilnius. If you could help me, I would be you much verbunden.Ich add for better contact my fax number in addition:0049/69/61994519 with kind regards Christoph Mueller Balinski son of the Alfred and Janina Balinski grandchild of the Alexander and the Konstanzia Balinski geb. Ryndcziewicz Christoph Müller-Balinski (racheengel999@yahoo.de)
Christoph Müller-Balinski <racheengel999@yahoo.de>
- Tuesday, February 15, 2005 at 20:33:33 (EST)
Good news for all Vilna researchers! Of the hundreds of Litvak shtetlach that our ancestors once inhabited, vital records have survived from only 101 towns. Vilna, the capital of present-day Lithuania is one of these. It is further distinguished by having the largest number of vital records spanning the greatest period of time. The Vilna birth records available for indexing begin in 1837 and continue through 1915 (consecutive); marriage records available for indexing - 1837-1915; divorce records available for indexing - 1837-1915; death records available for indexing -1837-1915. Both the number of records and the years they span comprise a goldmine of data for your family trees. The vast number of records for Vilna, which is estimated to exceed 150,000, are in the hands of the LitvakSIG. Due to the events of history and the 80 year time span these records cover, these records are written in many languages - Old Cyrillic Russian, Hebrew, Polish, German and Lithuanian. The records are here; the translators are waiting. All we need are the funds. There are over 2000 individuals researching surnames in Vilna. In addition there are a good number of researchers whose ancestors lived in Vilna at one period or another even if it wasn't their primary ancestral town. We have reason to feel proud of our connections to Vilna. It was the home of the Vilna Gaon and the Misnagdic movement, Mark Antokolsky, Sholem Asch, Max Weinreich, Matisyahu Strashun, Avenir Griliches [medalist to the Czar], Isaac Kowalski [ran the printing press in the Vilna Ghetto] among others. It was the original home of YIVO, the Strashun library and the Ramailes Yeshiva. If all of us Vilners support this vital records translation effort, we can give the project a proper start. We have all experienced the agony of waiting long periods for results -- whether for documents and information from archives, hired researchers abroad, or postings on the All-Lithuania Database [ALD]. Only through a unified, timely response can we achieve the results each one of us craves. I am launching this important drive in the hope that it will spark the project into action. Donations can be made by scrolling down to the end of this Digest and clicking on http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak/donor.htm Donations of $100 or more create eligibility to receive the Excel spreadsheets produced by the translators for the city of Vilna. Click on "Become a Contributor" and fill in Vilna under Vital Records Indexing Project. Please e-mail me with any questions or comments. I shall also contact all Vilna researchers personally as the project gains momentum. In addition, we are looking for ways to amass funding for these massive record sets in a timely manner. If anyone knows of individuals or organizations who might be willing to match donations, please let me know who they might be and their contact information. Joel Ratner Interim Coordinator, Vilna Vital Records Newton, Mass.
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- Sunday, February 13, 2005 at 15:53:54 (EST)
From the Director's Desk (November 2004); http://www.fjc.ru/AboutUs/leader.asp?AID=224854 ------------------------------------------------------------ ....She didn't know if he was Jewish, but would the rabbi stop in and see him, too? And that's how Rabbi Schvedik met Yuri. The elderly man was touched that the rabbi would take the time to visit him and offer him food. His face brightened when the young boys and girls sang Jewish songs for him. Finally, the rabbi pulled out his last menorah. "Yuri, have you ever seen one of these?" The elderly man was overcome. He reached out to touch the little menorah, speechless, tears rolling down his cheeks. "My name is Yaakov," he whispered. "I studied in a Jewish school when I was a child. The last time I lit a menorah was in a cellar in the ghetto of Glubokoye - my home town. I was only fourteen. It was the last Chanukah I spent with my parents. "After that, there was an uprising in the ghetto. My entire family and almost everybody else the Nazis killed them all. "I managed to escape, living in the forest with a group of partisans. Years later, I met and married a woman who also survived the Glubokoye ghetto. I locked my Jewish life away in the past. I never thought I'd ever see a rabbi here in Kaliningrad I never thought I'd light a menorah again." Trembling with emotion, Yaakov placed the candles in the menorah and struck a match. Then he said the blessings in perfect Hebrew! The flames flickered, then burned steadily reflected in the wide eyes of the youths, and the eyes of the old man who never imagined his Jewish soul would ever be rekindled. "Nes Gadol Haya Sham." Rabbi Schvedik will tell anyone who asks. "Yaakov himself is a Chanukah miracle. But it doesn't end there. Now he comes to the Jewish day school to tell the children about his past. "He has a grandson who would have been lost to the Jewish people forever, G-d forbid, who is now one of our students preparing for his bar mitzvah."......
http://www.fjc.ru/AboutUs/leader.asp?AID=224854
USA - Friday, February 11, 2005 at 20:36:08 (EST)
Hello all. I'm Larry Kotz. I have received many emails thanking me for this site. ALL the credit goes to Eilat. All I have done is send her an English translation of the Yiskor book that hopefully will be able to be scanned and put up on the site. If anyone has that capability please contact Eilat. She has graciously put my name on the site and I would like to dedicate this in Memory of my mother Luba Kotz 1921-1972, my father Zalman Ber (Sol) 1921-1994, brother Efriam David 1944-1944 , brother Sheldon 1951-1969 my granparents Ephriam Dov and Ethel and my aunt Frada and uncles Arkie and Label all killed by the nazis. My mothers parents Shlomo and Esther Brojde also murderd, my aunt Sylvia and Uncle Jack now also gone and finally to my children, Lindsey, Jacob and Shelby Kotz. May this be a legacy that they never forget their heritage and finally for the six million. May the world never forget! Tucson Arizona
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- Wednesday, February 09, 2005 at 02:22:28 (EST)
I´ve found your page by chance, I imagine the Katzowitz you have are the same family of mine. The elder I know is the father of my grandfather (great grandfather), Naum Katzowicz, who is from the area you wrote ( Krivichi), and he went to Argentina during 1920´s (he was born around 1900). He had many brothers (I think 10), the only one I know of is Moshé, who went to Israel after the WWII and died some years ago. Do you know anything about this? Thanks. A.K. -------------------------------- Alexander Katzowicz (fiestasycontactos@yahoo.com
Alexander Katzowicz <fiestasycontactos@yahoo.com>
USA - Wednesday, February 09, 2005 at 02:19:23 (EST)
My mother's name was Zeldin (became to Seldin in US). Her Father's Father was Hirschl Seldin. His father was Daniel Zeldin. Daniel's other children are Nakhum, Hinda, and Schmeryl. Daniel's brother was Reuben ( who was married to Esther) and had a son Mendl (married to Basia Zeldin). Mendl and Basia's children are Harry, Nakhum, Esther, Reuben and Daniel (as you indicated). I was over Harry's house, visited with Reuben many times, saw esther at famly affairs, and know Esther's children (in their 70's now).There are about 600 members of this family now. I should also tell you that I attended the Glubokie Society meetings in lower Manhattan in the 1950's with my grandfather--about 50 people. As you probably know, these were all people in the NY City area who came from Glubokie. I wish i had their names now. Gone forever.... ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DIRECTORY OF LANDMANSCHAFTEN ORGANIZATIONS in Israel; Glubokie. Y. Radzili, 30 Yehudit, Tel Aviv 67016. Glubokle. A. Rubin, 25 Reines, Givatayim.
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- Tuesday, February 01, 2005 at 15:12:09 (EST)
I am part of the surviving family ( Zeldin of Glubokeye) that Alte Arsh-Sudarsky wrote about in the chapter "Glubokoje", Lite -- I am related to Mendl, Basia, Harry, Nakhum,Esther, Daniel, Reuben, Samuel Zeldin . I am also related to the Malawer family which i do not know if the old country name was (shmuel) Mohilover or not ....... Jay Barrett (JBJBarr@aol.com) --------------------------------------------------------------- Glubokoye ; Photograph with caption: Mendl and Basia Zeldin and their children: Harry, Nakhum, Esther, Reuben and Daniel. (Arrived in New York 45 years ago)
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- Monday, January 31, 2005 at 03:07:52 (EST)
My Father, Joseph Levine was born in 1907 in Molodechno, which is near Vileka and Horodok. His father was Zalman Levine, who was born in Vilejka. He married Chivia (Sylvia) Brown, who was the daugher of Mendel Brown, who was a blacksmith in Molodechno. The last group of the family of 7 boys and 2 girls emigrated to U.S. and arrived in Feb. 1917. I do not know anything about my grandfather's family, other than he may have had a brother Harry. The family settled in New Haven, conn. If anyone knows anything about the Levine family, in vileka, please contact me at salevi@earthlink.net or 5117 Larekit Lane, Fort Wayne, Indiana 46804 Zalman probably came to the US in about 1912 or so.He was a bookbinder by trade.I would like to know if there is any record of the Levine family in the Vileka cemetery. ------------------------------------------ My name is Stanley Levine and I am a judge in Fort Wayne. salevi@earthlink.net 
Stanley Levine
- Saturday, January 29, 2005 at 22:01:51 (EST)
Bob Becker bob@becker-ks.com I am writing to tell you about the Haynt Tsaytung bey Yiddn website and to solicit your comment. This website about a book by Chaim Finklestein, the last editor of Haynt, a Jewish Daily newspaper in Warsaw, Poland before the Holocaust. His book, Haynt: a Tsaytung bey Yiddn 1908-1939, contains 31 years of pre-holocaust polish history and was published only in Yiddish. Chaim Finklestien's widow, Yadviga Finklestein, gave permission to reproduce Haynt and display it on the website: www.becker-ks.com/haynt, which makes Haynt available to Yiddish readers and coordinates volunteer translators working on translating Haynt into English. There is no business connected with this project. It is not for profit and all translations will be in the public domain. Sincerely, Bob Becker
www.becker-ks.com/haynt
- Wednesday, January 26, 2005 at 14:37:36 (EST)
Poszukuje wszelkich danych o losie mojego Dziadka Wlodzimierz Hajmana przywiezionego do obozu z getta w Wilnie moja Mama Elzbieta Eysymontt z domu Hajman widziala swojego Ojca po raz ostatni w punkcie zbornym w Wilnie skad Dziadka wywieziono do obozu w Stutthofie.....widziano go podobno wsród wiezniów podczas ewakuacji obozu/chorowal na tyfus ,mial odmrozone nogi-podobno dobity w drodze przez zaloge obozu.....swiadek .....Rubinowicz Ze wzgledu na pamiec o moim Dziadku zwracam sie z prosba o jakakolwiek informacje o jego pobycie lub dalszych losach z powazaniem Andrzej Eysymontt 27-400 Ostrowiec ul Radwana 13 /24 English from Polish;search for any (every) data My mum; elizabeth Eysymontt searches info about the fate of my grandfather taken for camp from ghetto in vilnius from house in rallying point in vilnius for camp in (to) among during evacuation of camp /sicken with typhoid supposedly ..... Andrzej Eysymontt 
Andrzej Eysymontt <eysymontt@wp.pl>
Poland - Tuesday, January 25, 2005 at 20:17:35 (EST)
Rechki Revision list of 1850; 2 ALPEROVICH Freida Shimon Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 3 ALPEROVICH Shimon Ovzer Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 4 ALPEROVICH Tsypa Gershen Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 5 ALTMAN Gershon Iosel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 6 ALTMAN Iosel Gershon Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 7 ALTMAN Itsko Mordukh Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 8 ALTMAN Mordukh Gershon Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 9 ALTMAN Movsha Gershon Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 10 ALTMAN Zusko Movsha Rechki Vileika 10 DYKSHTEIN Aizik Perets Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 11 DYKSHTEIN Basia Mordukh Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 12 DYKSHTEIN Beilia Nosel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 13 DYKSHTEIN Gendel Shlioma Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 14 DYKSHTEIN Gertsel Perets Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 15 DYKSHTEIN Gets Mordukh Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 16 DYKSHTEIN Gets Perets Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 17 DYKSHTEIN Gets Vulf Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 18 DYKSHTEIN Iankel Shlioma Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 19 DYKSHTEIN Leiba Shepshel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 20 DYKSHTEIN Leizer Zelik Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 21 DYKSHTEIN Mariasia Gets Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 22 DYKSHTEIN Matus Vulf Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 23 DYKSHTEIN Movsha Gets Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 24 DYKSHTEIN Movsha Shepshel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 25 DYKSHTEIN Nota Eizer Gets Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 26 DYKSHTEIN Perets Peisakh Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 27 DYKSHTEIN Resia Srol Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 28 DYKSHTEIN Rokha Girsha Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 29 DYKSHTEIN Rokha Shmuila Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 30 DYKSHTEIN Rokha Dveira Meier Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 31 DYKSHTEIN Shepshel Leiba Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 32 DYKSHTEIN Srol Shlioma Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 33 DYKSHTEIN Vulf Matus Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 34 DYKSHTEIN Zelik Leizer Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 35 DYNERSHTEIN Abram Afroim Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 36 DYNERSHTEIN Abram Girsha Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 37 DYNERSHTEIN Abram Iokhel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 38 DYNERSHTEIN Abram Iosel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 39 DYNERSHTEIN Abram Neukh Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 40 DYNERSHTEIN Abram Nosel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 41 DYNERSHTEIN Abram Iuda Berko Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 42 DYNERSHTEIN Afroim Iosel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 43 DYNERSHTEIN Aizik Berko Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 44 DYNERSHTEIN Aron Girsha Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 45 DYNERSHTEIN Aron Iankel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 46 DYNERSHTEIN Berko Aizik Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 47 DYNERSHTEIN Berko Leizer Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 48 DYNERSHTEIN Borukh Girsha Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 49 DYNERSHTEIN Braina Abram Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 50 DYNERSHTEIN Doba Abram Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. Page 51 DYNERSHTEIN Dovid Iosel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 52 DYNERSHTEIN Dovid Khaim Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 53 DYNERSHTEIN Faibish Movsha Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 54 DYNERSHTEIN Gendel Borukh Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 55 DYNERSHTEIN Gilel Abram Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 56 DYNERSHTEIN Ginda Shmuila Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 57 DYNERSHTEIN Girsha Iosel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 58 DYNERSHTEIN Girsha Iosel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 59 DYNERSHTEIN Gotlib Iankel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 60 DYNERSHTEIN Iokhel Itska Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 61 DYNERSHTEIN Iosel Abram Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 62 DYNERSHTEIN Iosel Sholom Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 63 DYNERSHTEIN Itsko Afroim Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 64 DYNERSHTEIN Khaika Berko Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 65 DYNERSHTEIN Khaika Gotlib Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 66 DYNERSHTEIN Khaika Meier Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 67 DYNERSHTEIN Khaim Borukh Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 68 DYNERSHTEIN Khaim Sholom Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 69 DYNERSHTEIN Khana Zelik Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 70 DYNERSHTEIN Khasia Abram Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 71 DYNERSHTEIN Khonon Gerts Girsha Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 72 DYNERSHTEIN Leia Iosel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 73 DYNERSHTEIN Leiba Aron Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 74 DYNERSHTEIN Leiba Gotlib Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 75 DYNERSHTEIN Leiba Iosel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 76 DYNERSHTEIN Leiba Nosel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 77 DYNERSHTEIN Liba Abram Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 78 DYNERSHTEIN Malka Itsko Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 79 DYNERSHTEIN Mariasia Girsha Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 80 DYNERSHTEIN Masia Iankel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 81 DYNERSHTEIN Meita Abram Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 82 DYNERSHTEIN Mendel Iokhel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 83 DYNERSHTEIN Merka Abel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 84 DYNERSHTEIN Mina Mendel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 85 DYNERSHTEIN Mnukha Shimon Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 86 DYNERSHTEIN Mordukh Leiba Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 87 DYNERSHTEIN Movsha Abram Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 88 DYNERSHTEIN Movsha Aizik Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 89 DYNERSHTEIN Movsha Dovid Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 90 DYNERSHTEIN Movsha Leiba Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 91 DYNERSHTEIN Neukh Iosel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 92 DYNERSHTEIN Nosel Girsha Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 93 DYNERSHTEIN Reiza Srol Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 94 DYNERSHTEIN Rokha Iankel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 95 DYNERSHTEIN Sosia Gerts Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 96 DYNERSHTEIN Tana Iosel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 97 DYNERSHTEIN Tauba Iosel Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 98 DYNERSHTEIN Uria Itska Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 99 FELDMAN Evzer Ovsei Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 100 FELDMAN Khaika Vulf Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 102 FELDMAN Sifra Zalman Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 103 FELDMAN Sorka Dovid Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 104 FELDMAN Zalman Evzer Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 105 FELDMAN Zalman Movsha Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 106 GOLUB Faibish Movsha Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 107 GOLUB Malka Shmuila Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 108 GOLUB Nakhemia Nokhum Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 109 KHODOS Khaim Shmuila Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 110 KHODOS Rokha Meier Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 111 KOPELIOVICH Leiva Girsha Dovid Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 112 KOPELIOVICH Perlia Dovid Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database. 113 REITSHTEIN SHULMAN Eilia Mikhel Meier Rechki Vileika Vilnius Year: 1850 Look in the REVISION LIST DATABASE section of the the All Belarus Database.
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- Monday, January 24, 2005 at 18:43:48 (EST)
Yad Vashem Data for Rzeczki; --------------------------------------------------------- Tikhok Khaim Rzeczki Wilno Poland 1919 Page of Testimony Alperovich Yehuda ( daughter; Fanny Silver in Brooklyn) Rzeczki Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Alperovich Yosef Rzeczki Wilno Poland 1904 Page of Testimony Alperovich David Rzeczki Wilno Poland 1929 Page of Testimony Alperovich Khana Rzeczki Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Tikhok Khaim Khaim Tikhok was born in Rzeczki, Poland in 1919 to Etta. He was an accountant and single. Prior to WWII he lived in Rzeczki, Poland. During the war was in Army, Ussr. Khaim died in 1943 in Belorussia. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 31/05/1999 by his sister, a Shoah survivor Source Pages of Testimony Last Name TIKHOK First Name KHAIM First Name YEFIM Mother's First Name ETTA Mother's First Name LIBA Gender MALE Date of Birth 1919 Place of Birth RZECZKI,WILNO,POLAND Marital Status SINGLE Place of Permanent Residence RZECZKI,WILNO,POLAND Profession ACCOUNTANT Place During Wartime ARMY,USSR Place of Death BELORUSSIA Date of Death 1943 Type of Material Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name KARP Submitter's First Name SARA Relationship to victim SISTER Date of Registration 31/05/1999 Is the Submitter a Survivor? YES Language RUSSIAN Alperovich Yehuda Yehuda Alperovich was born in Rzeczki, Poland to Pesakh and Liba. He was a businessman and married to Khana. Prior to WWII he lived in Rzeczki, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Yehuda died in 1942 in Kurzeniec, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1968 by his daughter from United states Pages of Testimony Last Name ALPEROVICH Last Name ALPEROVITZ First Name YEHUDA First Name KHAIM Father's First Name PESAKH Mother's First Name LIBA Mother's First Name LIBA Mother's First Name SHIFRA Gender MALE Place of Birth RZECZKI,WILNO,POLAND Nationality POLAND Marital Status MARRIED Spouse's First Name KHANA Spouse's First Name PESIA Place of Permanent Residence RZECZKI,WILNO,POLAND Profession BUSINESSMAN Place During Wartime KURZENIEC,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Place of Death KURZENIEC,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Date of Death 1942 Type of Material Page of Testimony Submitter's First Name FANNY Silver Submitter's Country UNITED STATES Alperovich Yosef Yosef Alperovich was born in Rzeczki, Poland in 1904 to Yehuda and Pesia. He was a merchant and married to Rivka. Prior to WWII he lived in Rzeczki, Poland. During the war was in Wilejka, Poland. Yosef died in 1942 in Wilejka, Poland at the age of 38. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1968 by his sister from United states Pages of Testimony Last Name ALPEROVICH Last Name ALPEROVITZ First Name YOSEF Father's First Name YEHUDA Mother's First Name PESIA Mother's First Name KHANA Gender MALE Date of Birth 1904 Age 38 Place of Birth RZECZKI,WILNO,POLAND Nationality POLAND Marital Status MARRIED Spouse's First Name RIVKA Place of Permanent Residence RZECZKI,WILNO,POLAND Profession MERCHANT Place During Wartime WILEJKA,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Place of Death WILEJKA,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Date of Death 1942 Type of Material Page of Testimony Submitter's First Name FANNY Submitter's Country UNITED STATES Alperovich David David Alperovich was born in 1929 to Yosef and Rivka Zlatopolski. He was a pupil and a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Rzeczki, Poland. During the war was in Wilejka, Poland. David died in 1942 in Wilejka, Poland at the age of 13. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1968 by his aunt; Fanny Silver from United states Alperovich Khana Khana Alperovich nee Ginzburg was born in Olchowce, Poland to Ytzkhak and Khaia. She was married to Khaim. Prior to WWII she lived in Rzeczki, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Khana died in Kurzeniec, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her daughter from United states Pages of Testimony Last Name ALPEROVICH Last Name ALPEROVITZ First Name KHANA First Name PESIA Maiden Name GINZBURG Maiden Name GINSBURG Father's First Name YTZKHAK Father's First Name YITZKHAK Mother's First Name KHAIA Mother's First Name ROZA Gender FEMALE Place of Birth OLCHOWCE,SANOK,LWOW,POLAND Marital Status MARRIED Spouse's First Name KHAIM Spouse's First Name YEHUDA Place of Permanent Residence RZECZKI,WILNO,POLAND Place During Wartime KURZENIEC,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Place of Death KURZENIEC,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Type of Material Page of Testimony Submitter's First Name FANNY Submitter's Country UNITED STATES Relationship to victim DAUGHTER
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- Monday, January 24, 2005 at 18:32:38 (EST)
Louis to Belarus Show options Jan 23 (16 hours ago) I am wondering if anyone knows the family from Novogrudok or Lyubcha (Lubtch) with the surname BOLDO/BOLDA/BOLDE? This is a rare surname, but is found in some Jewish people from the Novogrudok area. If you do, I would be greatful if you could let me know, as I would like to make contact with them. I know there was a Mordekhai BOLDE from Novogrudok, born in 1925 and living in Israel, who submitted his family names to the "Yad Vashem" Holocaust Memorial database. Would anyone know how I might contact him, assuiming he is still alive? Any information on this family would be greatly appreciated, as I want to record the history of this family. Sincerely, Louis Loccisano P.S. One Boldo family who came the the USA, settled in Connecticut and changed their name to "Goldberg" around the late 1800s. The father was named "Morris Goldberg". If anyone thinks they may be part of this family, please contact me.
Louis <loulocc@pacbell.net>
USA - Monday, January 24, 2005 at 11:59:55 (EST)
From: Leon Rubin Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2005 5:39 PM To: rdeutsch@cohn-goldberg-deutsch.com Subject: Re: [jfra] Fwd: 100,000 names for 100,000 lives saved by Wallenberg ----------- Hi Ron, About Timchok. I as a little boy being, after escaping Dolhinov Ghetto, in the partisan unit called "Pobeda" ( Victory ) which was affiliated to the well known "otryad" "Mstitel" ( Revenge ) heard a lot about Timchok who was its chief famous commander. Timchok's personal assistant was Avraham Friedman who passed away about three years ago. Timchok after the war was a Minister in the Belarus government, I don't think he is still a live. I don't know whether Timchok was ever nominated for Yad Vshem's righteous Christians and I wonder whether he would like to accept such a nomination because after all he was a communist nominated by the party to organize partisan resistance and saw his duty to fight the Germans. It is true that he surrounded him self with many Jews and very favorably related himself to Jews as a whole. Many Jews remember him with grate gratitude. As for the Taitz family in Dolhinov I can't add anything more to what I have already written to you previously. If I find any additional information I'll definitely let you know. What about organizing a Heritage tour to Dolhinov next August? Take care, Leon Would love to organize a trip to Dolhinov and to Israel afterwards. Are you thinking August 2005 or 2006? Maybe Eilat knows what happened to Timchok. The testimonials I read seem to credit him not only with organizing resistance forces but with saving their lives from the Nazis and he would seem to be deserving of a nomination as a righteous Christian for Yad Vashem. Perhaps, Timchock would be a good project for a investigative story????? Avraham Friedman was probably related to everyone on our family tree as we are all descended from Friedmans. Do you know who Avraham Friedman's parents and grand parents were? My great grandmother was Chai Sora Friedman from Dolhinov.
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- Sunday, January 23, 2005 at 22:01:13 (EST)
Attention Minsk Researchers: There are now 2275 researchers listed for Minsk in the JewishGen Family Finder. On November 19, 2004,, Joyce Field posted the following message to this discussion group: > Sadly, Jonina Duker will no longer be able to coordinate the > translation of the Minsk yizkor book. See > http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/minsk/minsk.html. We are, therefore, > looking for a volunteer to take over this important task. Initially > this person will work with Jonina, who has already selected the order > of chapters to be translated. We have a new excellent translator for > this book, but the coordinator will still review each translation for > spelling of proper names and consistency of tone. Jonina is > currently reviewing some recent translations, which will go online > shortly. > > There are 2250 researchers listed in the JGFF for Minsk, and it seems > likely, I hope, that some researchers in this very large group will > volunteer. If interested, please contact me or Dave Fox. > > Obviously, we will select only one of the 2250 researchers to > coordinate this book. So that leaves 2249 who do not need to feel > left out. To be a part of this great effort, you can donate money > for the translation. As you can see at > http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/projectdesc/yb_minsk.html, > over $41,000 is needed to translate the entire book. If every one of > the 2250 researchers donated Chai, we would have all the funds > needed to translate the book. > > If your heritage is meaningful to you, help us preserve it by > volunteering to coordinate the yizkor book translation and by > donating money to the translation project. > > Our thanks to Jonina for the wonderful work she has done. She will > graciously work with the new coordinator to make a smooth transition. > > Joyce Field > Yizkor Book Project Manager > jfield@jewishgen.org No one has come forth to take over from Jonina and assume the role as the translation coordinator for the two volume Minsk Yizkor Book. There are many surnames mentioned in these volumes and they have been translated from the book's name index . In addition, the table of contents for both volumes, as well as several chapters have already been translated . The rich history of your Minsk ancestors will be lost to the English speaking world if the Minsk Yizkor Book is not translated. Some of the articles in these books may give some of you leads to your own genealogy research, but as a minimum, it will provide some insight as to how your ancestors coped with like in Minsk. No Russian language skills are need to be the coordinator of the Minsk YB translation. The message from Joyce indicates what you need to do and it should not be terribly time consuming. Besides reviewing the translations from the paid translator, you will need to post an occasion message on the SIG discussion group to let everyone know about the progress on the project and also solicit donations to pay the translator. While we only need one coordinator, I hope that the rest of the people with ancestors from Minsk will show their support by making a generous donation and go to and designate your donation for the Minsk YB project. Thanks in advance for your support. Dave --
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/minsk/minsk.html
- Sunday, January 23, 2005 at 21:47:07 (EST)
Dear Eilat: I just noticed the list of partisans on your vishnevo website which includes my parents, Noah and Mina podberesky. where did the list come from? ....Sam Podberesky ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I found the names by searching the partisans site; http://www.gfh.org.il/partizan/EPD_Query.htm I checked the site again and had difficulties finding the data- Originally I used "Tshapayev" unit to find it .
http://www.gfh.org.il/partizan/EPD_Query.htm
- Sunday, January 23, 2005 at 02:22:59 (EST)
The Jewish Genealogy Society of Great Britain is honouring National Holocaust Memorial Day by holding a talk and the film ( Harkavy) on Novogrudok by Jack Kagan on the 23 January in a location in Edgeware, London at 3 pm, Sunday 23 January 2005. This is for members of JGSGB and for details of the venue please contact me privately. Jack was born in Novogrudok, escaped from the Ghetto and joined the Bielski partisans . Jack Kagan and Dov Cohen's account of Novogrudok and the Bielski Partisans "Surviving the Holocaust with the Russian Jewish Partisans". Kagan, J. & Cohen, D., London: Vallentine Mitchell, 1998. 275 p.). He has also recently compiled an English translation of the Novogrudok Yizkor Book (Pinkas Navredok) with additional material, eyewitness accounts and details of a Holocaust denier from the town (Novogrudok. The History of a shtetl, Jack Kagan with forward by Sir Martin Gilbert, London:Jack Kagan, 2004). Yhis has been privately published but he is planning on another edition which will be more widely available. Jack gave the first JGSGB talk about 7/8 years ago on Holocaust Memorial Day. His story is very enlightening and moving. The full programme of Holcaust Memorial Day meetings around the UK is onwww.holocaustmemorialday.gov.uk. General enquiries and information on local activities is available from localactivities@holocaustmemorialday.gov.co.uk or tel. 08702401180. Note also the programs on TV the History Channel : From the Auschwitz Chronicle from Monday 24-Friday 28 January at 10 pm, narrated by our JGSGB member Miriam Margolyes and Kenneth Brannagh see www.thehistorychannel.co.uk ( Sky sattelite channel 561, NTL 504/138 and Telewest channel 234. Saul Issroff ( London, United Kingdom
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- Saturday, January 22, 2005 at 15:05:23 (EST)
Thank you for you recent additions to the site. They are incredible. I cannot access the Gitlitz pictures. Can you email them to me. I am also in contact with members of the Gitlitz family in Binghamton NY. There is a large group of Gitlitzs living there. They are looking at your site and would also like to see the Gitlitz pictures. Thank you again. Best wishes for a Happy New Year. Bernard Gitlitz
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USA - Wednesday, January 19, 2005 at 23:46:01 (EST)
In Memoriam. ------------------------------------------ It is with sorrow that I announce the passing of Schlomo Schamgar ( Smorgonski ) on the twelfth of January 2005.---------------------- Schlomo was born in Dolhinov and was the only survivor of his family during the Holocaust. He made Aliya to Israel in 1948 and since served the Country and the Community with devotion. Schlomo was a man of great integrity, loved and respected by all who knew him, renowned for his good deeds and friendly human relations. He was one of the oldest and most venerated men of Dolhinov and played a central role in preserving the Memory of the perished Dolhinov Community. His death is a great loss to all of us. We extend our deep sincere condolences to his bereaved family.--- May his Memory be blessed.
Leon Rubin
Israel - Monday, January 17, 2005 at 23:11:39 (EST)
Many years ago David Tomback gave 9 pictures of the Popel family of Kovno to Yivo. He must have not known that one family member in the pictures survived the holocaust. I am posting here the original email that I received after posting the pictures on my site; My father, Popel Aron, son of Ezra from Kowno, had his first family :wife Rivka and sons Ezra, Itsik, Noah ( born in 1939-40). On June, 22 1941 my father was not in Kowno and has not had time to return before the arrival of the Nazies to the city. His family has been killed during the first action in the Kovno ghetto in November, 1941. Father was a soldier at war and in 1946 he married the second time to Lea (Leya) Bick, daughter of Dovid from Kriukai (near Jonishky). In 1946 I was born and in 1948 my sister Riva. In 1991 my family came to Israel from Kovno. My daddy has died on 10.10.1983 .He had no any photo of the first family. Due to you I could see them (kovno-portraits-# 12,13,14 www.eilatgordinlevitan.com) .Believe me when I have seen them I cried in front of the screen. It is one of the strongest impressions in my life. I do not have words which can express my gratitude. Besides in the list of emigrants in the USA from Kowno I have found Popel Josef. In Kowno there was only one family Popel, therefore it, probably, the brother of my grandfather Ezra. The name of father is incorrectly written to photos kov-p-# 14. His name Aron (Aharon), instead of Yitskhok. Father of my cousins was familiar with the daddy before war and has recognized them in the photo. I very much ask to be informed where these photos came from. Very much I hope, that someone from the family of Rivka (nee Tombak) has survived and I want to find them. Once again thanks with all my heart. My e-mail:popel@bezeqint.net Daniel Popel I wrote to Yivo and Daniel received an email; Mr. Popel, Your letter was forwarded to me by Eilat Gordin Levitan and I will try to provide you with the most information that I have. Unfortunately I do not have much. I am including with this email the 9 photos in our collection that feature members of the Popel family. They are available along with the majority of our pre-War Eastern European photos on our online catalog - http://yivo1000towns.cjh.org. These photos were donated many years ago to the YIVO Institute by David and Leah Tomback. Unfortunately, I have no other information about the donors. Before the 1970's, YIVO kept very little in the way of donor information except for in the case of large collections. I can tell you that there is a stamp on the back of each photograph that reads: David Tomback. 101-57 108th Street. Richmond Hill 19. Long Island, NY. This is an old stamp, and I have no information as to whether or not this person still lives there. I hope that this information is useful, I wish that I could offer more. Best, Jesse Cohen Assistant Photo and Film Archivist YIVO Institute for Jewish Research 15 West 16th Street New York, NY 10011 ---------------- Daniel forwarded to me the email he received from Yivo. I check on Ancestry.com and found out that David died in 1963 and Leah died in 1990. --------------------- I checked Jewishgen family finders for Tomback- I was happy to see; Searching for Surname TOMBACK - Number of hits: 8 ( 4 Researchers ) all looking for Tombacks fro Kovno or Jonava and one looking for Tomback from both places ( made me sure that they all must be related)----- I wrote them and on the same day received two answers; ....My mother's family were the Tomback's. At first I didn't remember any David Tomback from Richmond Hills, but now I do. I remember he was married to Leah, who I have met (she is now deceased, as is most of my mother's family). And they did live in Richmond Hills. I think we was my mother's uncle which would have made him my great-uncle. I so wish my mother were still around to ask her. I don't remember if they had any children, but I don't think so. I do know that my mother's parents came from Lithuania. My mother's maiden name was Kroshinsky, but her mother's name was Zelda Tomback Kroshinsky.... Adelle ----------------- I received an email from Dr. Tomback and I am pasting some of it here; "Thank you for your E mail. David Tomback was my second cousin. He passed away many years ago. His wife, Leah Tomback, has also died. I believe that she passed away at least 15 years ago.....
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- Wednesday, January 12, 2005 at 21:51:40 (EST)
Eilat, You have created an excellent web site. My Schulman family was from Dolginovo. I know of one Schulman, my great uncle Abraham, and four Gitlin's, Abraham's brother in law and his family, who arrived in New York from Dolginovo around 1900. I did not find any of them on the page http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/dolhinov/d_pages/d_ellisisland2.html. Are you interested in these additional names? If so I will send you the information that I have. My mothers family, while having roots in Dolginovo, her father Raphael Schulman, Abraham's brother, was also born in Dolginovo, but lived in Minsk after he was married. How often they returned to live in Dolginovo I do not know. If you consider them to be from Dolginovo is up to you. If you are interested in Raphael Schulman's family I can pass their Ellis Island information on as well. All of the Schulman's form the above arrivals are buried in the "Congregation Beith Abraham Anshet Dolhinow" section of Washington Cemetery in Brooklyn, NY.
Barry Chernick
Bellevue, , WA - Wednesday, January 12, 2005 at 10:57:05 (EST)
To: All Vishnive Families and Descendents ----------- From: Dvora Helberg ------- Modiin Israel Phone: 011-972-8-9700407 Fax: 011-972-8-9700503 e-mail: helberg@netvision.net.il ------------------------------------------------ Date: December 12, 2004 -------------------- Documentation of the Jewish Cemetery in Vishnive (near Volozin, Belarus) on the Internet ----------------------- Dear Friends, ------ I would like to notify you that we have built a new Internet site documenting the Jewish Cemetery in Vishnive. In this site, the following can be found: A photograph of each tombstone which remains in the cemetery. A list of the names of the deceased and dates of death as marked on the tombstones. A map of the cemetery with the exact location and numerical ID of each tombstone. The site address is: http://www.geocities.com/biography1915/projeng.html The cemetery renovation project has been done under the devoted supervision of Mr. Yuri Dorn, President of The Religious Jewish Communities in Belarus, and his dedicated crew. The work that has been done so far: 1. Clearing and removal of the wild vegetation of trees, thorny bushes and grass which has grown uninterruptedly in the cemetery for more than 60 years. ------- 2. Preventative treatment of vegetation to suppress regrowth. ----------- 3. Removal of waste which had been dumped in the cemetery for many years.---------- 4. Erection of most toppled tombstones.------------ 5. Cleaning the tombstones as much as possible.-------- 6. Photographing each tombstone.-------- 7. Mapping the cemetery and the location of each tombstone. ---------- 8. Preparation of a list of the names of the deceased and dates of death as written on the tombstones. Reading some of the stones required special effort because they had greatly deteriorated during the years, and their markings became almost illegible. ------------ Yuval Helberg and Yoav Rogovin volunteered and built the internet site and inserted all the cemetery information which had been collected. ------------- What else is left to be done: I. Building of a new Memorial marker at the site of the mass grave in the cemetery where the first group of Jewish victims was gunned down in 1941. We were promised that the work will begin this coming spring. ------------------- II. An addition to the existing Krave Street Memorial. The memorial will now state clearly that all the two thousand victims were Jews who were murdered by the Nazis and their local collaborators. In addition, the area around the memorial will be gardened. ----------------- III. Continuation of the preventative treatment to suppress vegetation regrowth. Such treatment takes about two years to become permanently effective. ----------------- IV. The building of a fence around the Jewish cemetery. ------------ Sincerely yours, Dvora Helberg ------------------- --------------------------------------------------------------------- Dear Friends of Vishnevo, Hello. Here is something truly wonderful. I thought you would want to log on to the newly created website for the restoration of the Vishnevo Cemetery. The stones have been read, the graves mapped, and here are photos of the gravestones and lists of names also other points of interest. The project is still underway, and your contributions are making an incredible difference. I remember well crawling through the underbrush in 2001 to discover some old Jewish graves....and now, the cemetery is almost totally restored! Heres wishing you all a healthy, happy, peaceful 2005! Best regards, Zane Buzby Dvora Helberg from Israel sends her love and regards. http://www.geocities.com/biography1915/projeng.html
http://www.geocities.com/biography1915/projeng.html
USA - Monday, January 10, 2005 at 10:45:11 (EST)
The Jewish Genealogy Society of Washington (JGSGW) will host a full day of discussion of interest to Belarus researchers. -----Join Us! ------- Date: Sunday, January 16, 2005 ----- Location: B'nai Israel Congregation, Rockville, MD ------- (For driving directions see our website: http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw/ --------- Workshop---- Time: 11:00 AM ----- Topic: NEW ENTRIES INTO THE ALL BELARUS dBAND HOW TO ACCESS THEM ------ Dave Fox, Coordinator of the Belarus SIG (Special Interest Group) will lead a lively discussion of the SIG, its website, and research projects. Whether or not you are a member of the Belarus SIG , if you have ancestors from Belarus, this workshop will include interesting data and research techniques. The presentation will include an introduction to new translations of the 1850 Revision List for the following shtetls: Dunilovichi, Molodechno, Iliya, Rushitsi, Vasiliev (Folvark), Myshlevichi, Poreviche, and Udranka. A discussion of the Vital Records Project will focus on Brest and Brest uyezd and information regarding business directories for some shtelts in Vitebsk Gubernia. ------- JGSGW Meeting ----------------- Time: 2:00 PM (Schmooze Session starts at 1:30 PM) ----- Topic: PRESERVING JEWISH HISTORIC SITES IN BELARUS. Speaker: Yuri Dorn, President of the Board of the Union of Religious Jewish Congregations in the Republic of Belarus. --------------- In 1412 for the first time several Jewish families were mentioned in the chronicles of the city of Brest-Litovsk (Brisk, Brest) - a city at the extreme western border of Belarus. During the next 100 years, Jews settled in Grodno (1436), Novogrudok (1445), Kobrin (1456), Minsk (1489), and Pinsk (1506). In 1766 the adult population of the Jewish community of Belarus reached 62,800 persons; the largest number of whom lived in Minsk and Pinsk. By 1896, there were about 750,000 Jews in Belarus, but this number decreased by half over the next next twenty-five years. In 1941, the Jewish population of Belarus had increased to nearly 800,000 people. With the demise of the Soviet Union, many Jews immigrated to Israel and the United States. Today, there are about 55,000 Jews in the area, most of who live in the capital city of Minsk. Find out what is being done to preserve the historic sites of this community. -------------------------- For more information, check out our website at http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw/ Regards, Marlene Bishow------------ Vice President - Programs JGSGW Rockville, MD
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw/
- Saturday, January 08, 2005 at 14:38:37 (EST)
I must admit that I found this site by mistake but this is a great site!!! I wish more people will invest their time to build sites like this one. Thank you. All contact lens information which allows you to easily buy contact lens. Even find free contact lens in just a click of a button in contact lens online. Find discount contact lens and cheap contact lens, go ahead and order contact lens. You can use it even if you just need contact lens case for your contact lenses. Information is also available on color contact lens, coloured contact lens, toric contact lens, bifocal contact lens, soft contact lens, disposable contact lens, ciba contact lens, focus contact lens, crazy contact lens, freshlook contact lens, contact lens canada, cosmetic contact lens and many more...
Mike Feyler <mike@contact-lens-central.com>
USA, USA USA - Wednesday, January 05, 2005 at 22:22:01 (EST)
Andi Alpert Ziegelman (zieg_exp@netvision.net.il) wrote;---------------------------------------------------------------------------Message:... In the 1850 Kurenecs Revision List I found my Alperovich great grandparents, after conducting a stab-in-the-dark search.I was searching in the dark because my grandparents, the last generation about which I had any information, were from Postawy and Vileika, not Kurenecs. My research was helped by a Vilnius Archives search of the 1875 Postawy Voters' List, where I hoped I might find my grandfather, and I did.I also learned that my grandfather was from Kurenecs. To make a long story short, I now know that I am descended from two different Kurenecs Alperovich families, who lived in Kurenecs in Houses Number 128 and 139. In House Nummber 128 lived the family of my paternal grandmother,Simcha/Celia bat Meir nee Alperovich Alperovich, while in House Number 139 lived the family of my paternal grandfather, Dov Ber/Barnett ben Zalman Alperovich. Simcha's father moved from Kurenecs to Vileika, while Ber's father moved from Kurenecs to Postawy. Simcha and Ber are said to be first cousins, but I now know that they are not related - at least not closely related - through their Alperovich fathers. I believe, but am not 100% sure, that Simcha's Alperovich line is: Simcha (1885-1971) bat Meir (1847-1924) ben Nakhem Sholom (b. 1827) ben Meir (b. 1793) ben Abel/Aba (b. about 1770). The piece de resistance of THIS story is that through Jewishgen I received from Californian Ronnie Greenberg some odd photocopied pages from an 1847 Kurenecs Revision List, one of which was signed by the head of the kahal (community) by MY great great great grandfather, Meir ben Abel/Aba alperovich, IN HEBREW! What a momento to have! When I saw it I almost jumped out of my skin! The line of Ber Alperovich, my paternal grandfather is: Ber (1885-1952) ben Zalman (1858(?)-1894) ben Nota/Nathan (b. 1825) ben Menka/Benjamin (b. 1805) ben Nota (born about 1785-died probably before 1825). When Revision Lists for 1834 and earlier soon become available I will be able to take my tree back farther. It appears that the 1700's Alperoviches of Kurenecs may not have been related. I've heard that Alperoviches were excommunicated from Vilna, maybe in 1782, and moved to Kurenecs. I've also heard that before the excommunication, our name was Heilprin. I've also heard that the mitnaged Heilprin family excommunicated its chasidic members. AND - I've read that the surname of the Baal Shem Tov, founder of the hasidic movement, was - Heilprin. So I have great incentive, as if I needed any - for continuing this genealogical "work." MOST IMPORTANT: I want to tell everyone how much I enjoyed working with the 1850 Kurenecs Revision List in EXCEL format. I got the Excel format after contributing $100 to the 1850 Kurenecs Revision List Project.Though cash is tight with me, this $100 was extraordinarily well spent. I intend to contribute to the projects to purchse and translate earlier Kurenecs Revision Lists, and I highly reccomend that all researchers investigating their roots contribute to the projects to purchase and translate the records of their ancestral towns.
Andi Alpert Ziegelman <zieg_exp@netvision.net.il>
Israel - Tuesday, January 04, 2005 at 18:33:05 (EST)
Klaus Klein (klein.ns@att.net) ; Message: During the second world war, my uncle, Paul Bohm, was injured in the battle of the Urel. From dubious sources I have heard that he was sent to a hospital at which he never arrived and he is missing, and most likely dead, since that time. With the new information I am trying to research more about that battle.
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- Saturday, January 01, 2005 at 15:28:59 (EST)
am pleased to announce that the Belarus Surname Index has been updated with records from the 1850 Vileika uyezd (district) Revision list for the following towns: Dunilovichi (410) Molodechno (275) Iliya (856) Rushitsi vil. (138) Vasiliev vil.(Folvark) (17) Myshlevichi vil. (10) Poreviche vil. (15) Udranka vil. (12) There are a total of 1733 entries. These records will be added to the All Belarus Database (ABD) during the next quarterly update. In the meantime, you can view the data from the Belarus Surname Index . This phase completes the 1850 Vileika uyezd Revision List. The previous phases are already on the ABD. Work has begun on the 1834 Vileika uyezd Revision List. However, additional funds are needed to complete the project. Please show your appreciation for the 1850 Revision List by making a donation to JewishGenerosity/Belarus to complete the 1834 Vileika Revision List. While you are at it, consider a donation to the Belarus SIG General Fund and to JewishGen as well. Dave
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- Friday, December 31, 2004 at 10:50:54 (EST)
Am interested in the Borisov, Bela rus, GUREVITCH family history. Three of the boys emmigrated to Canada via Latvia and England c 1900, two to England, two remaining in the Borisov region. Rose GUREVITCH-FLAVELL (dennis@fflavell.freeserve.co.uk)
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- Wednesday, December 29, 2004 at 04:21:14 (EST)
Late this summer, I made a two-week research trip to the National Historical Archives of Belarus in Minsk. As with my first visit to the Archives in 2001, it was a terrific experience and highly rewarding from a research point of view - my biggest breakthrough coming on the second last day when, with the help of an 1800 register of "Supplementary Revisions", I was able to push my documented Family Tree back to about 1730 and, in the process, discover how a collateral branch of my family, also going back to the mid-1700's, fitted on to the main trunk. In the hope that it may be of help to other Belarus researchers, I have prepared a lengthy report on getting to, and working in, the Archives in Minsk, which will be published shortly in the SIG's Online Newsletter. My main conclusion from 2001 stands - a visit to the Archives is very worthwhile, but only if and provided that you come extremely well prepared and that you are aware of the formidable difficulties in locating relevant material. As a pre-requisite, your own research should have reached a fair degree of maturity and you should have scoured in advance every available guide and reference tool to the files in the Archives. Otherwise, you are liable to put out a lot of money for a very small return. But if you can do it, nothing beats the thrill of working through the primary sources yourself and having your ancestors jump out at you, sometimes seeing their actual signatures and taking part, albeit vicariously, in their real-life experiences, as they interacted for better or worse with the Czarist Russian bureaucracy. Neville LAMDAN
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- Tuesday, December 21, 2004 at 16:32:55 (EST)
My grandfather on his Certificate of Naturalization dated 19 Oct 1896,gives the following information: Jacob Levine Formerly of Rupian, County of Vilna, Russia. I believe that should be Pumpian. Jacob was born Feb 1859 (1900 US Census), he died in Los Angeles, CA 9 april 1910 age 52 years 2 mo. Given on the certificate was the names of his father Barnei/Benjamin and mother Fannie (Levine). Jacob's wife was Rachel Lena Abramson, b 9 April 1863, possibly in Smargone? in now Belarus. Rachel parents were Osher Abramson born c1831, who died 1900 Kervo (near Vilna) and Tamar Abram. This family is fairly well docutmented. Jacob and Rachel were married 9 April 1882 at Vilna, Grbernia, Russia, the marriage was witnessed by her brother Samuel Abramson. He family was said to have owned a brewery. Jacob had a sister, was said to have owned a bakery. Two known brothers Morris and Harrison b Jan 1865, possibly others. The name was changed from Zusmanovich/Zusanamoweitz ! or possibly variation of spellings, to Levine when they came to America. A traditional story is that the "uncle" as he was called of Jacob, was a secetary/poet to Alexander II, and that Alexander sent the "uncle" to Queen Victoria to act in that capacity. I hope that someone out there can connect to this information. Gloria Padach Laguna Beach, CA seamore2@cox.net
Gloria Padach
- Sunday, December 19, 2004 at 05:16:30 (EST)
Aside from Lucy Dawidowicz's memoir, how many memoirs/histories/studies are there of Vilna in the late 30s? > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Hirsz Abramowicz , Profiles of a Lost World -- "rare eyewitness account of the Vilna Jews between the two world wars. There are numerous portaits of leading figures of the time. There are accurate and detailed descriptions of daily life, the rise of various social movements, and educational systems. One of the most interesting chapters describes their care of mental patients." Esther Hautzig, Remember Who You Are -- born in Vilna in 1930, deported to Siberia just before start of WWII Daniel Charney, Wilno (Memorias) Argentina, 1951 Ephim Jeshurin, ed. Wilno: a book dedicated to the city of Wilno, 1935 Celia Heller, On the Edge of Destruction: The Jews of Poland Between the Two World Wars Joseph Buloff, From the Old Marketplace born in Vilna in 1900; describes an earlier period since he left in 1927, but a wonderful book Herman Kruk, The Last Days of Jerusalem of Lithuania (1939-1944)--began diary in Sept 1939 when he arrived in Vilna from Warsaw Leyzer Ran, Jerusalem of Lithuania (3 vols--hard to find) lots of photographs taken by Ran, also some text--I don't think it exists in translation. AJHS Manuscript Catalog: Vilna in Pictures ORG. NAME: Federation of Jews from Vilna in USA ORG. LOCATION: New York, NY NOTES: Advertising booklet for photo album showing Jewish way of life in Vilna between the two World Wars. Issued in 1955. http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/Lita.html Baal Dimion (Nahum Shtiff), Vilna and Lita (written in 1921) -- recently translated, soon to be available on-line after I finish editing. Dr. Mordecai Kossover, Vilna - Jerusalem of Lita -- not yet translated There is an excellent book, in french, " Lituanie juive 1918-1940 Message d'un monde englouti" , editors Plasseraud & Minczeles in the collection " Memoires" Editions Autrement, sept 1996 ISSN 1157-4488-130F
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- Wednesday, December 15, 2004 at 22:34:22 (EST)
Today I received an email about Dolhinov from Leon Rubin.... I talked to my brothers trying to find out more about the Taitz family in Dolhinov. Hirshel Taitz's wife Lifsha was a cousin of my father, they had 4 children Mote, Malka, Zalman, Mates, all of them perished in Dolhinov in the Holocaust. Hirshel's father was called Motke and his mother Malke. He had a sister Mera who also perished in Dolhinov. They were the only Taitz family in Dolhinov. My brothers don't know whether they had any family connection to the Deutch, Gitlitz, Siniuk and other related families. If I manage to find out some more
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- Tuesday, December 14, 2004 at 13:35:50 (EST)
On Sat, 11 Dec 2004 18:18:05 +0200, popel wrote: > > > > Many thanks for such necessary and excellent work. > > My father, Popel Aron, son of Ezra from Kowno, had his first > family :wife Rivka and sons Ezra, Itsik, Noah ( born in 1939-40). On > June, 22 1941 my father was not in Kowno and has not had time to return before the arrival of the Nazies to the city. His family has been killed during the first action in the Kovno ghetto in November, 1941. > > Father was a soldier at war and in 1946 he married the second time to Lea (Leya) Bick, > daughter of Dovid from Kriukai (near Jonishky). In 1946 I was born and in 1948 my sister Riva. In 1991 my family came to Israel from the Soviet Union. My > daddy has died on 10.10.1983 .He had no any photo of the first family. > > Due to you I could see them (kov-p-# 12,13,14) .Believe me when I have seen > them I cried in front of the screen. It is one of the strongest impressions > in my life. I do not have words which can express my gratitude. > > Besides in the list of emigrants in the USA from Kowno I have found Popel > Josef. In Kowno there was only one family Popel, therefore it, probably, the > brother of my grandfather Ezra. > > The name of father is incorrectly written to photos kov-p-# 14. His name > Aron (Aharon), instead of Yitskhok. Father of my cousins was familiar with > the daddy before war and has recognized them in the photo. > > I very much ask to be informed where these photos came from. Very much I hope, that > someone from the family of Rivka has survived and I want to find them. > > Once again thanks with all my heart. My e-mail:popel@bezeqint.net > > Daniel Popel. > > P.S. I badly know English language and have transferred this letter by means > of the electronic translator from the Internet. If something is not clear, > please write to me. > > I thank you in advance for the answer to very important question for me. > > Daniel Popel. The pictures are from the Yivo site "1000 towns." They have a search engine where you can find tens of thousands of pictures.
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- Saturday, December 11, 2004 at 15:22:45 (EST)
Dear Eilat: Just the other day I signed up for the digest from the Belarus SIG. I have not been able to go very far with the ancestors of my Sussman family, who lived in Ivje. I have previously concentrated on other parts of the family and in Poland. It is the first time I have seen the town spelled in Hebrew and in Yiddish, something so simple yet compelling. When I found your web site and went to the Ivie section, I was very touched and I am sure my mother will be. She is 87 and now lives in Sefat. This is her father's family who came from this area. I just sent her the link. I have a precious picture of my mother's grand parents on their farm in Botsford, Conn, sponsored I figure, by the Baron de Hirsch foundation--somewhere around 1910. This man was Israel Sussman (son of David) and his wife Anna, who may have been a Schwartzberg. She was an only child. We do not know anything about Israel's family. On their death certificates (in 1925 and 1926) it says Israel's mother was Leah Soper and Anna's parents were Jacob Schwartzberg and Sarah Silver. My great grand parents were born around 1850, He was a teacher (religious school). They (the family) came here around 1895-1900, with all their children and the first grandchildren. Susmann was the name at Ellis Island and Sussman the name in America for the whole family, but I have no way of knowing if it was Zusman originally. I would need to check special resources of names in particular places to make any better guess Thank you for your efforts!!!! Ann Harris Los Angeles
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- Wednesday, December 08, 2004 at 19:27:07 (EST)
DNA Clears the Fog Over Latino Links to Judaism in New Mexico Tests confirm what tradition and whispers have alluded to -- a Sephardic community often unbeknownst to many of its members. By David Kelly Times Staff Writer December 5, 2004 Los Angeles Times http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-heritage5dec05,1,3173654.story ALBUQUERQUE - As a boy, Father William Sanchez sensed he was different. His Catholic family spun tops on Christmas, shunned pork and whispered of a past in medieval Spain. If anyone knew the secret, they weren't telling, and Sanchez stopped asking. Then three years ago, after watching a program on genealogy, Sanchez sent for a DNA kit that could help track a person's background through genetic footprinting. He soon got a call from Bennett Greenspan, owner of the Houston-based testing company. "He said, 'Did you know you were Jewish?' " Sanchez, 53, recalled. "He told me I was a Cohanim, a member of the priestly class descended from Aaron, the brother of Moses." With the revelation that Sanchez was almost certainly one of New Mexico's hidden or crypto-Jews, his family traditions made sense to him. He launched a DNA project to test his relatives, along with some of the parishioners at Albuquerque's St. Edwin's Church, where he works. As word got out, others in the community began contacting him. So Sanchez expanded the effort to include Latinos throughout the state. Of the 78 people tested, 30 are positive for the marker of the Cohanim, whose genetic line remains strong because they rarely married non-Jews throughout a history spanning up to 4,000 years. Michael Hammer, a research professor at the University of Arizona and an expert on Jewish genetics, said that fewer than 1% of non-Jews possessed this marker. That fact - along with the traditions in many of these families - makes it likely that they are Jewish, he said. "It makes their stories more consistent and believable," Hammer said. It also explained practices that had baffled many folks here for years: the special knives used to butcher sheep in line with Jewish kosher tradition, the refusal to work on Saturdays to honor the Sabbath, the menorahs that had been hidden away. In some families, isolated rituals are all that remain of a once-vibrant religious tradition diluted by time and fears of persecution. Norbert Sanchez, 66, recalled the "service of lights" on Friday nights in his hometown of Jareles, N.M., where some families would dine by candlelight. "We always thought there was a Jewish background in our family, but we didn't know for sure," he said. "When I found out, it was like coming home for me." In 1492, Jews in Spain were given the choice of conversion to Catholicism or expulsion. Many fled, but others faked conversions while practicing their faith in secret. These crypto-Jews were hounded throughout the Spanish Inquisition. "In the 1530s and 1540s, you began to see converted Jews coming to Mexico City, where some converted back to Judaism," said Moshe Lazar, a professor of comparative literature at USC and an expert on Sephardic Jews, or those from Spain and Portugal. "The women preserved their tradition. They taught their daughters the religion. People began rediscovering their Jewishness, but remained Catholics." But in 1571, the Inquisition came to Mexico. Authorities were given lists to help identify crypto-Jews, Lazar said. People who didn't eat pork, knelt imperfectly in church, rubbed water quickly off newly baptized babies or didn't work on Saturday were suspect. If arrested, they were sometimes burned at the stake. Many fled to what is now northern New Mexico, and remained secretive even after the U.S. gained control of the area in 1848. "Still, no one would come out and say: 'I am a Jew.' That didn't happen until the 1970s," said Stanley Hordes, a professor at the Latin American and Iberian Institute of the University of New Mexico who is writing a book on crypto-Jews. "The first few generations kept the secret because of danger of physical harm, and later they kept it because that was just what they did. The $64,000 question is: Why the secrecy today? Why are people keeping this information from their kids and grandkids?" Some haven't. "I found out when I was 13," said Keith Chaves, 47, an engineer in Albuquerque. "My great-grandmother told me that we were Sepharditos." The family matriarch was a repository of knowledge - and the keeper of secrets. "She kept a kosher knife rolled up in a piece of leather that she would only use for killing," Chaves said. "And she would kill the animal by cutting its throat in one motion. She abhorred the ways others killed animals." Born a Catholic, Chaves now attends an Orthodox synagogue in Albuquerque. He has made four documentaries on crypto-Jews and is working on a movie about his family history. "When I found out about my roots, I went to the library and my world opened up. I started peeling what turned out to be a 500-year-old onion," he said. "I have reclaimed my life. I live a Jewish life now. I think my great-grandmother told me because she expected me to do something fruitful with the information." Others have sought the truth on their own. Elisea Garcia was raised by a strong-willed grandmother with strange habits. "We would have a big dinner on Friday night with candles," said Garcia, 66, who is awaiting the results of a DNA test done on her son to see if he has the Cohanim marker, which is found only in the Y chromosome. "She would butcher the animals then examine them inside out for any sign of impurity. On Saturday we weren't even allowed to wash our hair." When her grandmother died, Garcia found a silver menorah hidden in her room. "I'm a curious person, but my uncle told me not to dig into things because they weren't important," she said. Garcia, a Catholic, attends both synagogue and church. "It makes me aware of the whole concept of God," she said. Greenspan, whose Family Tree DNA does the testing for Sanchez's project, said there had been a surge of interest in genealogy among Latinos looking for Jewish connections. "We believe a fairly high percentage of first families [arriving] in New Mexico were nominally Catholic, but their secret religion was Judaism," he said. "We are finding between 10% and 15% of men living in New Mexico or south Texas or northern Mexico have a Y chromosome that tracks back to the Middle East." They are not all Cohanim, and there's a slight chance some could be of African Muslim descent. But Greenspan said the DNA of the men is typical of Jews from the eastern Mediterranean. Test participants scrape cells from the inside of their cheeks and mail samples to Greenspan, who has them analyzed by researchers at the University of Arizona. The process takes about a month, with costs ranging from $100 to $350 depending on the detail requested. Women, who do not possess the Y chromosome, must have a male relative take the test in order to participate. Since discovering his past, Father Sanchez - who wears a Star of David around his neck - has traveled throughout the state giving talks on the history and genealogy of New Mexico. He also runs the Nuevo Mexico DNA Project and website that tells how people can take part. Sanchez describes his Jewish history as "a beautiful thing" complementing, not conflicting with, his priestly life. "I have always known I was Jewish; I can't explain it, but it was woven into who I was," he said. After Mass one recent morning, a group of parishioners filed out of St. Edwin's. None had a problem with their priest's dueling religious traditions. "He has taken us back to our roots," Robert Montoya said. And Theresa Villagas smiled. "We are all children of God," she said. "I think this just adds richness to our lives." Copyright 2004 Los Angeles Times
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- Monday, December 06, 2004 at 11:21:38 (EST)
I found our family name under Krivichi Martyrs-Anshlevitz. Any info would be appreciated. Jamie Levitz Jamie Levitz (dorlev@rogers .com) -------------------- http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/vileyka/vil_pix/111001vp10_b.gif There was a family Anshlevitz in Vileika- The daughter; Riva married to the well known Chabad family Shneirson. Her husband (Liona Shneirson was well educated Kurenets, Belarus ... Shneorson (the pharmacist) his wife, their son Liyona, the son's wife, Riva nee Anshlevitz and their daughter, were murdered in 1943, ten months after the day of slaughter (9-9-1942) when all the Jews in the area were killed. Since the German needed a pharmacist they kept the family alive. The family helped many Jews with their escape. They were in touch with the Russian partisans and gave them information about the German army. They wanted to escape to the forest and hide but They were told by the partisans to stay in Kurenitz for a little longer and then they would be helped with their escape... The German found out that they are helping the Jews who escaped and were hiding in the forests and giving information to the partisans and killed them. One son survived http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/schneerson.html
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/schneerson.html
- Sunday, December 05, 2004 at 12:37:29 (EST)
Alpirowicz Ela ------------   Ela Alpirowicz was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1921 to Izrael and Sara. She was single. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Ela died in 1942 in Kurenets, Poland at the age of 21. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1957 by her sister, a Shoah survivor ========== Rodnitzki Rivka nee Alperovitz------------   Rivka Rodnitzki was born in Korzhenitz, Poland in 1900 to Khaim and Khana. She was married. Prior to WWII she lived in Korzhenitz, Poland. During the war was in Korzhenitz, Poland. Rivka died in 1942 in Korzhenitz, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 12/12/1988 by Fanny ========= Dimenstin Riwka ---------   Riwka Dimenstin nee Alperovitz was born in Korzeniec, Poland in 1905 to Khone and Khana. She was a household and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Korzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Poland. Riwka died in 1942 in Kobylnik, Poland with her daughter Asnat Feiga age 13. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 05/12/1955 by her acquaintance Alperovitz from Haifa========= Tzimerman Frida*   Frida Tzimerman nee Alperovitz was born in Kurzeniec, Poland in 1903 to Michael Icie and Nekhama. She was a farmer and married to Hela. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. Frida died in 1944 in the Shoah at the age of 41. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 16/04/1999 by her son, Shimon Zimerman, a Shoah survivor ========= Szapiro Dwora---------   Dwora Szapiro nee Alperovitz was born in Kurzeniec, Poland. She was a shop owner and married to David. Prior to WWII she lived in Glubokie, Poland. During the war was in Glubokie, Poland. Dwora died in 1943 in Glubokie, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 08/01/1959 by her nephew Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      ALPEROVITZ Submitter's First Name      PINKHAS in Hadar Yosef Relationship to victim      NEPHEW (the son of her sister) Date of Registration      08/01/1959 =================== Alperowicz Rywka----------   Rywka Alperowicz was born in Kurzeniec, Poland in 1918. She was single. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Rywka died in 1942 in Kurzeniec, Poland at the age of 24. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1957 by her acquaintance, a Shoah survivor =============== Alperowicz Rywka-------------   Rywka Alperowicz nee Khodesh was born in Dolhinow, Poland in 1897 to Eli Meir and Feiga. She was a baker and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Rywka died in 1942 in Kurenets, Poland at the age of 45. Also a son Yechiel age 13 and a daughter Feiga Lea age 15 perished. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1955 by her son Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      ALPEROVITZ Submitter's First Name      NATAN ============== Zendel Ichak--------------   Ichak Zendel was born in Korzeniec, Poland. He was a shoemaker and married to Rivka. Prior to WWII he lived in Korzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Korzeniec, Poland. Ichak died in 1941 in Korzeniec, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 10/07/1955 by his cousin ============= Alperowicz Yekhiel--------------   Yekhiel Alperowicz was born in 1929 to Rywka Khodesh. He was a pupil and a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Yekhiel died in 1942 in Kurenets, Poland at the age of 13. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1955 by his brother Natan =========== Alperovicz Ichyl---------------   Ichyl Alperovicz was born in Korzeniec, Poland in 1918 to Zusha (son of Shimon) and Basha Chana. He was a merchant and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Korzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Kurnik, Poland. Ichyl died in 1941 in Kurnik, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 15/07/1957 by his neighbour ============ Alperowicz Yekhiel-------------   Yekhiel Alperowicz was born in Kurzeniec, Poland to Zisha and Batia. He was a pupil and single. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Yekhiel died in Kurzeniec, Poland at the age of 20. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1957 by his relative ============= Alperovitz* Yekhiel-------   Yekhiel Alperovitz was born in Miadel, Poland in 1934 to Shmuel and Lea. He was a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Miadel, Poland. During the war was in Miadel, Poland. Yekhiel died in 1942 in Miadel, Poland at the age of 8. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 13/09/1999 by Arie Geskin, a Shoah survivor ========= Alperowicz Abram   Abram Alperowicz was born in Kurnic, Poland in 1923 to Meir and Rakhel. He was single. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurnic, Poland. During the war was in Kurnic, Poland. Abram died in 1941 in Kurnic, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 15/07/1957 by his neighbour. Lajkind Sara   Sara Lajkind nee Alprowicz was born in Wilno, Poland. She was a housewife and married to Avraham. Prior to WWII she lived in Wilno, Poland. During the war was in Minsk, Belorussia. Sara died in Minsk at the age of 48. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her brother-in-law Alpirovich Leizer   Leizer Alpirovich was born in Dolhinow, Poland in 1895 to Shmuel and Dina. He was a butcher shop owner and married to Kheina. Prior to WWII he lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war was in Dolhinow, Poland. Leizer died in Dolhinow, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his friend   PLANET Submitter's First Name      ELIAHU Alperowicz Elejzer   Elejzer Alperowicz was born in Dolhinow, Poland in 1920 to Kalmen and Chaja Tzirolin. He was a worker and single. Prior to WWII he lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war was in Dolhinow, Poland. Elejzer died in 1942 in Dolhinow, Poland at the age of 22. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his relative Alperovich Ele   Ele Alperovich was born in Borisov, Belorussia in 1915 to Khaim and Leshe Mebel. He was an accountant and single. Prior to WWII he lived in Borisov, Belorussia. During the war was in Borisov, Belorussia. Ele died in 1941 in Borisov, Belorussia at the age of 26. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his brother from Russia ALPEROVICH Submitter's First Name      ESFIR Submitter's Country      RUSSIA Relationship to victim      BROTHER Alperovic Lolek   Lolek Alperovic was born in Wilno, Poland in 1912 to Meir and Chasel. He was an agronomist and single. Prior to WWII he lived in Wilno, Poland. During the war was in Wilno, Poland. Lolek died in 1943 in Wilno, Poland at the age of 31. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his relative Alperowicz Genia/ Hinda   Genia Alperowicz was born in Kurzeniec, Poland to Meir and Rakhel Lea. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Genia died in 1944 in Kurzeniec, Poland at the age of 30. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1957 by her cousin BELINSKI Submitter's First Name      KHANA Relationship to victim      COUSIN Furman Chana   Chana Furman nee Alperovitz was born in Kurzeniec, Poland in 1901 to Avraham and Liba. She was a housewife and married to Avraham. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Chana died in 1942 in Kurzeniec, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 22/11/1956 by her sister MARRIED Spouse's First Name      AVRAHAM Spouse's First Name      MOSHE Name of 1st Child*      LIBA Name of 1st Child*      YITZKHAK Age of 1st Child      14 Name of 2nd Child      LIBA Age of 2nd Child      12 Name of 3rd Child      TZIPORA Age of 3rd Child      10 Place of Permanent Residence      KURZENIEC,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Profession      HOUSEWIFE Place During Wartime      KURZENIEC,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Place of Death      KURZENIEC,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Date of Death      1942 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      TZUKERMAN Submitter's First Name      SARA Relationship to victim      SISTER Date of Registration      22/11/1956 Gurewicz Yehuda   Yehuda Gurewicz was born in Ilja, Poland in 1883 to David and Khana. He was married to Frida nee Levin. During the war was in Wiszniew, Poland. Yehuda died in 1942 in Wiszniew, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 22/11/1956 by his niece Gurewicz Frida   Frida Gurewicz was born in Wiszniewo, Poland. She was married. Prior to WWII she lived in Wiszniewo, Poland. During the war was in Wiszniewo, Poland. Frida died in 1942 in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 22/11/1956 by her niece Lewin Gitel   Gitel Lewin nee Alperovitz was born in Kurzeniec, Poland in 1908 to Avraham and Liba. She was married to Yosef Leib Levin. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Gitel died in 1942 in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 22/11/1956 by her sister Alperovich Khana   Khana Alperovich nee Ginzburg was born in Olchowce, Poland to Ytzkhak and Khaia. She was married to Khaim. Prior to WWII she lived in Reczki, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Khana died in Kurzeniec, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her daughter from United states Page of Testimony Submitter's Name      FANNY Silver Submitter's Country      UNITED STATES Relationship to victim      DAUGHTER Alperovich Lipa   Lipa Alperovich was born in Poland to Mendel and Malka Iofe. Prior to WWII he lived in Olshiye Sittsy, Poland. During the war was in Olshiye Sittsy, Poland. Lipa died in the Shoah at the age of 35. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his nephew from Russia
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- Saturday, December 04, 2004 at 11:46:24 (EST)
Shpringer Ytzkhak--   Ytzkhak Shpringer was born in Zawiercie, Poland in 1885. He was a farmer and married to Shifra. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Ytzkhak died in 1943 in Horodok, Poland at the age of 58. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1990 by his son Shpringer Shifra--   Shifra Shpringer nee Winer was born in Russia in 1897 to Gutl and Hinda. She was a housewife and married to Ytzkhak. Prior to WWII she lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Shifra died in 1943 in Horodok, Poland at the age of 46. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1990 by her son Shpringer Yaakov ---   Yaakov Shpringer was born in Horodok, Poland in 1915. He was a farmer. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Army, Ussr. Yaakov died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1990 by his brother Pages of Testimony Last Name      SHPRINGER First Name      YAAKOV Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1915 Place of Birth      HORODOK,POLAND Place of Permanent Residence      HORODOK,POLAND Profession      FARMER Place During Wartime      ARMY,USSR Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      SHPRINGER Submitter's First Name      SHABTAI (Shepsel) Relationship to victim      BROTHER in Petach Tikva Shpringer Faive---   Faive Shpringer was born in Horodok, Poland in 1918 to Ytzkhak and Shifra Winer. He was a farmer. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Army, Ussr. Faive died in 1941 in the Shoah at the age of 23. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1990 by his brother Shpringer Dodel --- Shpringer was born in Horodok, Poland in 1921 to Ytzkhak and Shifra nee Winer. He was a pupil. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Army, Ussr. Henek died in 1944 in the Shoah at the age of 23. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1990 by his brother Shpringer Henek---   Henek Shpringer was born in Horodok, Poland in 1922 to Ytzkhak and Shifra Winer. He was a pupil. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Army, Ussr. Henek died in 1944 in the Shoah at the age of 22. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1990 by his brother Shpringer Gotel---   Gotel Shpringer was born in Horodok, Poland in 1932. She was a child. Prior to WWII she lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Gotel died in 1942 in Horodok, Poland at the age of 10. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1990 by her brother Shpringer Hinde---   Hinde Shpringer was born in Horodok, Poland in 1936 to Ytzkhak and Shifra Winer. She was a pupil and a child. Prior to WWII she lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Hinde died in Horodok, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1990 by her brother; Shabtai Shpringer of petach Tikva Shpringer Zalman---   Zalman Shpringer was born in Horodok, Poland in 1938 to Ytzkhak and Shifra Winer. He was a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Zalman died in Horodok, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1990 by his brother Shabtai Shpringer of petach Tikva Kur Mordhai----   Mordhai Kur was born in Wilejka, Poland in 1890 to Yehoshua and Sara. He was a merchant and married to Rivka. Prior to WWII he lived in Wilejka, Poland. During the war was in Grodek, Poland. Mordhai died in Krasne, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 16/05/1955 by his daughter Kur Rywka nee VOLOZINSKI----   Rywka Kur was born in Grodek, Poland in 1895 to Eliezer. She was a merchant and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Molodeczno, Poland. During the war was in Grodek. Rywka died in Krasne, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1957 by her daughter      Pages of Testimony Last Name      KUR First Name      RYWKA First Name*      RIVKA Maiden Name*      VOLOZINSKI Father's First Name      ELIEZER Gender      FEMALE Date of Birth      1895 Place of Birth      GRODEK,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Marital Status      MARRIED Place of Permanent Residence      MOLODECZNO,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Profession      MERCHANT Place During Wartime      GRODEK,GHETTO Place of Death      KRASNE,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      LEBTZELTER Submitter's First Name      LEA Relationship to victim      DAUGHTER Date of Registration      01/01/1957 Kur Abram ----   Abram Kur was born in Grodek, Poland in 1910 to Mordekhai. He was a merchant and married to Frida. Prior to WWII he lived in Grodek, Poland. During the war was in Grodek. Abram died in Krosno, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his sister   Pages of Testimony Last Name      KUR First Name      AVRAHAM First Name      ABRAM Father's First Name      MORDEKHAI Mother's First Name*      RIVKA Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1910 Place of Birth      GRODEK,POLAND Marital Status      MARRIED Spouse's First Name      FRIDA Spouse's Maiden Name*      DRISVIATZKI Name of 1st Child*      NAKHMAN Age of 1st Child      8 Place of Permanent Residence      GRODEK,POLAND Profession      MERCHANT Place During Wartime      GRODEK,GHETTO Place of Death      KROSNO,KROSNO,LWOW,POLAND Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      LEBTZELTER Submitter's First Name      LEA Relationship to victim      SISTER Kur Benyamin ----   Benyamin Kur was born in Kleck, Poland in 1937 to Abraham and Frida. He was a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Baranowicze, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Benyamin died in 1943 in Krasne, Poland at the age of 6. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1987 by his aunt Kur Frida ----   Frida Kur nee Kashetzki was born in Sokolka, Poland. She was a teacher and married to Abraham. Prior to WWII she lived in Baranowicze, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Frida died in 1943 in Krasne, Poland at the age of 40. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1987 by her sister-in-law   Frida Kur was born in 1911 to Mordekhai. She was a merchant and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Grodek, Poland. During the war was in Grodek, Poland. Frida died in Krasna. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her relative Kur Lazar ----   Lazar Kur was born in Grodek, Poland in 1918 to Mordekhai. He was a yeshiva student and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Grodek, Poland. During the war was in Grodek. Lazar died in Krasne, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1957 by his sister Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      KUR First Name      ELIEZER First Name      LAZAR Father's First Name      MORDEKHAI Mother's First Name*      RIVKA Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1918 Place of Birth      GRODEK,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Marital Status      MARRIED Place of Permanent Residence      GRODEK,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Profession      YESHIVA STUDENT Place During Wartime      GRODEK,GHETTO Place of Death      KRASNE,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      LEBTZELTER Submitter's First Name      LEA Relationship to victim      SISTER Date of Registration      01/01/1957 Kur Eliezer----   Eliezer Kur was born in Horodok, Poland in 1915 to Mordekhai and Rivka. He was a torah scholar and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Eliezer died in 1943 in Krasne, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1987 by his sister Pages of Testimony Last Name      KUR First Name      ELIEZER Father's First Name      MORDEKHAI Mother's First Name      RIVKA Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1915 Place of Birth      HORODOK,POLAND Marital Status      MARRIED Place of Permanent Residence      HORODOK,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Profession      TORAH SCHOLAR Place During Wartime      HORODOK,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Place of Death      KRASNE,WILNO,POLAND Date of Death      1943 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      RABINOVITZ
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- Thursday, December 02, 2004 at 14:59:10 (EST)
Horodok data from Yad Vashem; Gerber Eliyahu Bentzion Eliyahu Gerber was born in Rassa, Ukraine to Mordekhai and Hadasa. He was a rabbi and married to Rakhel. Prior to WWII he lived in Gorodok, Poland. Elihyau died in Wilno, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony Gerber Rachel nee LEIBOWITZ Rachel was born to David. She was married to Eliyahu Bentzion. Prior to WWII she lived in Horodok, Poland. Rachel died in Wilno at the age of 60. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/07/2003 by her great-grandson from United states Pages of Testimony Last Name GARBER First Name RACHEL Maiden Name LEIBOWITZ Father's First Name DAVID SHMUEL Gender FEMALE Age 60 Marital Status MARRIED Spouse's First Name BENTZION ELIAHU Place of Permanent Residence HORODOK, Place of Death WILNO,GHETTO Cause of Death KILLING Type of Material Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name LEWITTES Submitter's First Name MEIR Submitter's Country UNITED STATES Relationship to victim GREAT-GRANDSON Date of Registration 20/07/2003 Garber Jakow Jakow Garber was born to Reuven and Sheina. He was a tailor and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Jakow died in the Shoah at the age of 46. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 10/03/1957 by Ester Blit Source Pages of Testimony Last Name GRABER First Name YAAKOV Father's First Name REUVEN Mother's First Name SHEINA Gender MALE Age 46 Marital Status MARRIED Spouse's First Name* RAKHEL Spouse's Maiden Name STARINSKI Name of 1st Child REUVEN Age of 1st Child 12 Name of 2nd Child SHEINA Age of 2nd Child 8 Place of Permanent Residence HORODOK,POLAND Profession TAILOR Place During Wartime HORODOK,POLAND Type of Material Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name BLIT Submitter's First Name ESTER Date of Registration 10/03/1957 Garber Rishke Rishke Garber nee Starinski was born in Horodok, Poland. She was married to Yaakov. Prior to WWII she lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Rishke died in the Shoah at the age of 43. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 10/03/1957 by Ester Blit Novik Ester Ester Novik nee Rabinovich was born in Gorodok, Belorussia in 1885 to Eliahu. She was a housewife and married to Zalman. Prior to WWII she lived in Riga, Latvia. During the war was in Riga, Latvia. Ester died in Rumbula, Latvia. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1994 by her son Pages of Testimony Last Name NOVIK First Name ESTER Maiden Name RABINOVICH Maiden Name RABINOVITZ Father's First Name ELIAHU Gender FEMALE Date of Birth 1885 Place of Birth GORODOK,BELORUSSIA Marital Status MARRIED Spouse's First Name ZALMAN Place of Permanent Residence RIGA,RIGAS,VIDZEME,LATVIA Profession HOUSEWIFE Place During Wartime RIGA,RIGAS,VIDZEME,LATVIA Place of Death RUMBULA,RIGAS,VIDZEME,LATVIA Type of Material Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name NOVIK Submitter's First Name YAAKOV Rabinovitz Yehuda* Yehuda Rabinovitz was born to Yaakov and Khana. He was married. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Yehuda died in 1942 in Horodok, Poland at the age of 50. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/07/1999 by Bronia nee Kur Rabinovitz from Israel, a Shoah survivor Rabinovitz Tzvia* Tzvia Rabinovitz. She was married to Yudel and had 3 children. Prior to WWII she lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Tzvia died in 1942 in Horodok, Poland at the age of 40. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/07/1999 by her family from Israel, a Shoah survivor Source Pages of Testimony Last Name RABINOVITZ First Name* TZVIA Gender FEMALE Age 40 Marital Status MARRIED Place of Permanent Residence HORODOK,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Place During Wartime HORODOK,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Place of Death HORODOK,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Date of Death 1942 Type of Material Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name RABINOVITZ Submitter's Country ISRAEL Relationship to victim FAMILY Date of Registration 20/07/1999 Is the Submitter a Survivor? YES Rabinovitz Shima Shima Rabinovitz was born in Horodok, Poland to Zvia and Yudel. She was a pupil and single. Prior to WWII she lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Shima died in 1942 in Horodok, Poland at the age of 17. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/07/1999 by her family from Israel, a Shoah survivor Pages of Testimony Last Name RABINOVITZ First Name SHIMA Mother's First Name* TZVIA Gender FEMALE Age 17 Place of Birth HORODOK,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Marital Status SINGLE Place of Permanent Residence HORODOK,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Profession PUPIL Place During Wartime HORODOK,POLAND Place of Death HORODOK,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Date of Death 1942 Type of Material Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name RABINOVITZ Submitter's First Name* BREINA Submitter's Country ISRAEL Relationship to victim FAMILY Date of Registration 20/07/1999 Is the Submitter a Survivor? YES Rabinovitz Ozer* was a partisan and died fighting the Germans. Ozer Rabinovitz was born in Horodok, Poland to Tama and Yankel. He was a pupil and single. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Ozer died in 1942 in the Shoah at the age of 25. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/07/1999 by his family from Israel, a Shoah survivor Pages of Testimony Last Name RABINOVITZ First Name* OZER Mother's First Name* Tama and father; Yankel Gender MALE Age 25 Place of Birth HORODOK,POLAND Marital Status SINGLE Place of Permanent Residence HORODOK,POLAND Profession PUPIL Place During Wartime HORODOK,POLAND Date of Death 1942 Type of Material Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name RABINOVITZ Submitter's First Name* BREINA Submitter's Country ISRAEL Relationship to victim FAMILY Date of Registration 20/07/1999 Is the Submitter a Survivor? YES Rabinoviz Shalom Shalom Rabinoviz was born in Poland. He was married to Froma. During the war was in Ghetto. Shalom died in 1942 in the Shoah at the age of 68. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 12/04/1999 by his neighbour in Horodok Bronia nee Kur Rabinovitz from Petach Tikva, Israel, a Shoah survivor RABINOVITZ First Name SHALOM Gender MALE Age 68 Place of Birth POLAND Marital Status MARRIED Spouse's First Name FROMA Place of Permanent Residence POLAND Place During Wartime GHETTO Date of Death 1942 Type of Material Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name RABINOVITZ Submitter's First Name BRONISLAVA Submitter's Country ISRAEL Felig Itzhak Itzhak Felig was born in Warszawa, Poland. He was single. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. Itzhak died in 1942 in the Shoah at the age of 9. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 12/04/1999 by his neighbour, a Shoah survivor Pages of Testimony Last Name FELIG First Name ITZHAK First Name YITZKHAK Gender MALE Age 9 Place of Birth WARSZAWA,WARSZAWA,WARSZAWA,POLAND Marital Status SINGLE Place of Permanent Residence HORODOK,POLAND Date of Death 1942 Type of Material Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name RABINOVITZ Submitter's First Name BRONISLAVA Relationship to victim NEIGHBOUR Date of Registration 12/04/1999 Is the Submitter a Survivor? YES Lifszitz Sima Sima Lifszitz nee Rabinovicz was born in Horodok, Poland in 1914 to Tzvia. She was a baker and married to Yaakov. Prior to WWII she lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Sima died in 1942 in the Shoah at the age of 28. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her sister-in-law Pages of Testimony Last Name LIFSZITZ Last Name LIFSHITZ First Name SIMA Maiden Name RABINOVICZ Maiden Name RABINOVITZ Mother's First Name TZVIA Gender FEMALE Date of Birth 1914 Age 28 Place of Birth HORODOK,POLAND Marital Status MARRIED Spouse's First Name YAAKOV Place of Permanent Residence HORODOK,POLAND Profession BAKER Place During Wartime HORODOK,POLAND Date of Death 1942 Type of Material Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name SHTIL Submitter's Last Name SHTIL Submitter's First Name SHOSHANA Relationship to victim SISTER-IN-LAW Lifshiz Ytzkhak Ytzkhak Lifshiz was born in Wolozyn, Poland in 1881 to Hoshea. He was a blacksmith and married to Khasia. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Ytzkhak died in 1942 in Horodok, Poland at the age of 61. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his daughter Pages of Testimony Last Name LIFSHIZ Last Name LIFSHITZ First Name YTZKHAK First Name YITZKHAK Father's First Name HOSHEA Mother's First Name* SLAVA Gender MALE Date of Birth 1881 Age 61 Place of Birth WOLOZYN,WOLOZYN,NOWOGRODEK,POLAND Marital Status MARRIED Spouse's First Name KHASIA Spouse's First Name CHESIAH Place of Permanent Residence HORODOK,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Profession BLACKSMITH Place During Wartime HORODOK,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Place of Death HORODOK,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Date of Death 1942 Type of Material Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name SHTIL Submitter's Last Name SHTIL Submitter's First Name SHOSHANA Podbereski Slava Slava Podbereski was born in Horodok, Poland to Khaim and Sarah nee Lifshitz. She was a child. Prior to WWII she lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Slava died in Horodok, Poland at the age of 10. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her aunt Podberezki Mr. Podberezki was born in Horodok, Poland to Khaim and Sarah Lifshitz. He was a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. He died in Horodok, Poland at the age of 4. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his aunt Podbereski Lejb Lejb Podbereski was born in Horodok, Poland in 1939 to Khaim and Sara. He was a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Lejb died in 1942 in Horodok, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 14/10/1955 by his aunt Chashesman Chava Chava Chashesman nee Lifshitz was born in Horodok, Poland to Ytzkhak and Khasia. She was an accountant and married to Yasha. Prior to WWII she lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Krasne, Poland. Chava died in Krasne, Poland at the age of 24. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her sister Submitter's Last Name SHTIL Submitter's First Name SHOSHANA Chashesman Yasha Yasha Chashesman was born in Molodeczno, Poland. He was an engineer and married to Chava. Prior to WWII he lived in Molodeczno, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Yasha died in Krasne, Poland at the age of 30. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his sister in law; Submitter's Last Name SHTIL Submitter's First Name SHOSHANA in Kibutz Ruchama in the Negev. Fredkin Sara Sara Fredkin was born in Rubiezewicze, Poland in 1900. Prior to WWII she lived in Molodeczno, Poland. During the war was in Grodek, Poland. Sara died in 1943 in Krasne, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 26/06/1984 by her nephew Source Pages of Testimony Last Name FREDKIN First Name SARA Gender FEMALE Date of Birth 1900 Place of Birth RUBIEZEWICZE,STOLPCE,NOWOGRODEK,POLAND Place of Permanent Residence MOLODECZNO,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Place During Wartime GRODEK,MOLODECZNO,WILNO,POLAND Place of Death KRASNE,WILNO,POLAND Date of Death 1943 Type of Material Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name FREDKIN Submitter's First Name HIRSH Relationship to victim NEPHEW Date of Registration 26/06/1984 Averbukh Freida Gorodok Belorussia 1878 Page of Testimony Rabinowitch Khaim Horodok Poland Page of Testimony Rabinowitch Yakov Horodok Poland Page of Testimony Szepsenwol Chiena Stolpce Stolpce Nowogrodek Poland 1911 Page of Testimony Lifszitz Sima Horodok Poland 1914 Page of Testimony Rabinowitch Bluma Horodok Poland Page of Testimony Rabinovitz Ozer* Horodok Poland Page of Testimony Rabinovitz Yehuda* Horodok Poland Page of Testimony Rabinovitz Tehila* Horodok Poland Page of Testimony Rabinovitz Tzvia* Horodok Molodeczno Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Rabinovitz Shima Horodok Molodeczno Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Fidelhop Frumet* Horodok Molodeczno Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Rabinovitz Shima Horodok Poland Page of Testimony Rabinovitz Frumet* Grodek Molodeczno Wilno Poland 1914 Page of Testimony Rabinovitz Shalom* Grodek Molodeczno Wilno Poland 1906 Page of Testimony Novik Ester Riga Rigas Vidzeme Latvia 1885 Page of Testimony Rabinowicz Tzipe Antipolye Kobryn Polesie Poland Page of Testimony Unknown Ester Baranowicz Baranowicze Nowogrodek Poland Page of Testimony Fredkin Sara Molodeczno Molodeczno Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony
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- Thursday, December 02, 2004 at 13:46:00 (EST)
Taibe (related to the Kristal/Kantor family of Shavli) and Dov Rabinovitz of Shavli, Lithuania were the parents of Dr. Ada Yeta Levitan (my husbands' grandmother). Taibe died in 1939 of overian cancer. Dov rabinovitz died in 1936 of cancer. Their son Gershon was killed during explosion caused by primus in South Africa in the 1920s Son Reuven was a soldier in the Rusian army during the first world war. he came to take care of his mother who was sick with typhus. She recovered and he contracted typhus and died. Tankel Sarah   Sarah Tankel nee Krystal was born in Zagare, Lithuania to Shmuel Fayvel. She was married to Beryl. Prior to WWII she lived in Zagare, Lithuania. Sarah died in 1941 in Riga, Latvia. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 07/04/2002 by her son TANKEL Submitter's First Name      DAVID Relationship to victim      SON in New York Date of Registration      07/04/2002 Kristal Arie   Arie Kristal was born in Trishik, Lithuania in 1870 to Natan. He was a merchant. Arie died in 1941 in Trishik, Lithuania. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 13/05/1955 by his relative Pages of Testimony Last Name      KRISTAL First Name      ARIE First Name      URIA First Name*      LEIB Father's First Name      NATAN Mother's First Name*      FRUMET Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1870 Place of Birth      TRISHIK,SIAULIAI,LITHUANIA Profession      MERCHANT Place of Death      TRISHIK,SIAULIAI,LITHUANIA Date of Death      1941 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Name      KHAIM Eliashev Relationship to victim      RELATIVE Date of Registration      13/05/1955 Tel Aviv Testimony  Rabinovitz Yitzkhak  Siauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania  1906  Page of Testimony  Rabinovitz  Shawli  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Rabinovitz Baile  Radwiliszki  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Rabinovitz Dawid  Radvili  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Leibenson Golda  Radiviliskis  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Rabinovich Jeta  Zagare  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Lifshitz Ester*  Shavli  Siauliai    Lithuania  1900  Page of Testimony  Rabinowitz Itzhak  Riga  Rigas  Vidzeme  Latvia  1865  Page of Testimony  Mentz  Siauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania  1899  Page of Testimony  Rabinoviciute Sifra  Lithuania        1918  Page of Testimony  Rabinovich Avraham  Zager  Siauliai    Lithuania  1923  Page of Testimony  Rabinovici Aizik  Telz  Telsiai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Rabinowitz Yetta  Shiauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania  1899  Page of Testimony  Rabinowitz Frieda  Sauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania  1927  Page of Testimony  Rabinowitz Yetta   Yetta Rabinowitz was born in Kretinga, Lithuania in 1899 to Chaim and Sarah. Frieda. She was married to Zwi Hirsh Rabinovitz. Prior to WWII she lived in Shiauliai, Lithuania. During the war was in Stutthof. Yetta died in 1944 in Stutthof.Name of 1st Child;  FREIDA SARAH Age 17 also perished. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 03/05/1973 by her daughter LOVE nee RABINOWITZ Submitter's First Name      DORA Relationship to victim      DAUGHTER Date of Registration      03/05/1973 lived in South Africa Moses Rabinowitz was born in Kretinga, Lithuania in 1919 to Zwi and Yetta. Prior to WWII he lived in Kaunas, Lithuania. During the war was in Stutthof, Danzig. Moses died in 1944 in Stutthof, Danzig. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his sister Grinbergiene Batia          1876  Page of Testimony  Rabinovitz Yitzkhak  Siauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania  1906  Page of Testimony  Rabinovitz  Shawli  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Rabinovitz Baile  Radwiliszki  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Rabinovitz Dawid  Radvili  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Leibenson Golda  Radiviliskis  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Rabinovich Jeta  Zagare  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Lifshitz Ester*  Shavli  Siauliai    Lithuania  1900  Page of Testimony  Rabinowitz Itzhak  Riga  Rigas  Vidzeme  Latvia  1865  Page of Testimony  Mentz  Siauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania  1899  Page of Testimony  Rabinoviciute Sifra  Lithuania        1918  Page of Testimony  Rabinovich Avraham  Zager  Siauliai    Lithuania  1923  Page of Testimony  Rabinovici Aizik  Telz  Telsiai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Rabinowitz Yetta  Shiauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania  1899  Page of Testimony  Rabinowitz Frieda  Sauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania  1927  Page of Testimony  Rabinovici Aviva  Telschi  Telsiai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Ordman Eta  Siauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania  1876  Page of Testimony  Eisenstat Pesia  Zagare  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Rabinovich Lev  Minsk  Minsk City  Minsk  Belorussia  1908  Page of Testimony  Leibius Sifra  Siauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania  1911  Page of Testimony  Rabinaviciene Reise  Radviliskis  Siauliai    Lithuania  1877  Page of Testimony  Rubinovicz Szmuel  Lodz  Lodz  Lodz  Poland  1916  Page of Testimony  Rubinovich Dow  Lida  Lida  Nowogrodek  Poland  1918  Page of Testimony  Rubinovicius Isroel  Gudel  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Shmuel Shara  Shavel  Siauliai    Lithuania  1904  Page of Testimony  Rabinovitz Smuel  Mazeikiai  Mazeikiai    Lithuania  1884  Page of Testimony  Rabinovitz Slata  Popilan  Siauliai    Lithuania  1890  Page of Testimony  Rabinovitz Yenta  Zagare  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Lebiush Shifra  Savli  Siauliai    Lithuania  1909  Page of Testimony  Eizenshtat* Pesia  Zagare  Siauliai    Lithuania  1906  Page of Testimony  Source   Rabinovitz  Siauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Rabinovitz  Siauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania  1935  Page of Testimony  Rabinovitz Yaakov  Siauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Rabinovich Joseph  Siauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania  1890  Page of Testimony  Rabinovich Chana  Siauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania  1890  Page of Testimony  Kaplan Batia  Kaunas  Kaunas    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Rabinowicz Hanna  Joniskis Siauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania  1880  Page of Testimony  Rabinavicius Schlomas  Radviliskis  Siauliai    Lithuania  1875  Page of Testimony  Rabinowicz Gizela*  Paris  Seine - Seine Et Oise    France  1896  Page of Testimony  Rabinoviciene Dora  Zager  Siauliai    Lithuania  1896  Page of Testimony  Kotliar Mina  Papile  Siauliai    Lithuania  1888  Page of Testimony  Rabinovici Beila  Savli  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Rabinowicz Szmuel  Mazeiki  Mazeikiai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Danilin Dina  Riga  Rigas  Vidzeme  Latvia  1904  Page of Testimony  Landsman Masha  Riga  Rigas  Vidzeme  Latvia  1907  Page of Testimony  Rabinovitz Yosef  Siauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania  1905  Page of Testimony  Rabinovitz  Siauliai  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Kaplan Batia  Radwiliszki  Siauliai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Rabinovitz Yitzkhak*            Page of Testimony  Rabinaviciene Reise   Reise Rabinaviciene was born in Posvol, Lithuania in 1877. She was a housewife and married to Schlomo. Prior to WWII she lived in Radviliskis, Lithuania. During the war was in Lithuania. Reise died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1955 by her sister-in-law Grinbergiene Batia nee Rabinovitz   Batia Grinbergiene was born in Siauliai, Lithuania in 1876 to Mordekhai and Ita Rabinovitz. She was a housewife. Batia died in 1941 in Panevezhis, Lithuania. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 24/05/1955 by her son Meir Givati Greenberg in Nezer Cireni Rabinowitz Itzhak   Itzhak Rabinowitz was born in Janischki, Lithuania in 1865 to Eliezer. He was a merchant and a widower of Sara. Prior to WWII he lived in Riga, Latvia. During the war was in Riga, Latvia. Itzhak died in 1941 in Riga, Latvia. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 13/03/1956 by his son
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- Wednesday, December 01, 2004 at 23:39:02 (EST)
Kramnik Frejda nee Veisbord   Frejda Kramnik was born in Wolozyn, Poland in 1892 to Yaakov Veisbord and Matka nee Dolgov. She was a grocer and married to Mikhael Kramnik from Kurenets. Prior to WWII she lived in Wolozyn, Poland. During the war was in Wolozyn, Poland. Frejda died in 1942 in Wolozyn, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 18/12/1955 by her daughter Bela nee Kramnik Salitarnik ----- Fania Zelazo nee Kramnik was born in Wolozyn, Poland in 1917 to Mikhael and Frida. She was a housewife and married to Shlomo. Prior to WWII she lived in Wolozyn, Poland. During the war was in Wolozyn, Poland. Fania died in 1942 in Wolozyn, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 18/12/1955 by her sister Bela nee Kramnik Salitarnik in Haifa Rakhel Kramnik was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1900 to Barukh and Gita. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Rakhel died in 1941 in Kurenets, Poland at the age of 22. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1990 by her cousin Bela nee Kramnik Salitarnik in Haifa Gita Kramnik was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1893. She was a housewife and married to Barukh. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Gita died in 1941 in Kurenets, Poland at the age of 48. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1990 by her niece Bela nee Kramnik Salitarnik in Haifa Shimon YOSEF Kramnik son of Hilel was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1893. He was a bank manager and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Shimon died in 1941 in Kurenets, Poland at the age of 48. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1990 by his relative Bela Salitarnik (her father was his first cousin)- About five years ago I spoke with the son of Shimons' brother. He told me that all the other children of Hilel Kramnik came to America. There were many daughters- most lived in the north part of New York state and changed their last name to Kramer. Kramnik Baroch   Baroch Kramnik was born in Kurzeniec, Poland in 1887 to Yoel Aharon and Rivka. He was a grocer and married to Gita- They had four children; daghters who perished; Rachel at age 17, Yta age 15 and Rivka age 13. He had a son Michael ( who was able to escape and joined the Red Army. unknown to his cousin Bela he survived , married and had two children in the Soviet Union- in the 1990s his widow and children immigrated to Israel and found Bela!) Prior to WWII he lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Baroch died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 18/12/1955 by his niece. Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      KRAMNIK Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      KRAMNIK First Name      BARUKH Father's First Name      YOEL Mother's First Name      RIVKA Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1891 Age      50 Place of Birth      KURENETS,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Marital Status      MARRIED Spouse's First Name      GITA Place of Permanent Residence      KURENETS,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Profession      SHOP OWNER Place During Wartime      KURENETS,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Place of Death      KURENETS,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Date of Death      1941 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      SALITERNIK Submitter's First Name      BELA Relationship of victim      UNCLE (brother of her father) Date of Registration      01/01/1990 Kramnik Mikhel (He survived)   Mikhel Kramnik was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1921 to Barukh and Gita. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Mikhele died in 1941 in Kurenets, Poland at the age of 20. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his cousin Bela Salitarnik Kramnik Itke  Kurenets  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1924  Page of Testimony  Kramnik Rivka  Kurenets  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1928  Page of Testimony  Kramnik Rakhel  Kurenets  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1900  Page of Testimony  Kramnik Gisha (unknown married name)   Gisha nee Kramnik was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1889 to Yoel and Rivka. She was a housewife and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Gisha died in 1941 in Kurenets, Poland at the age of 52. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1990 by her niece Bela Salitarnik ---------------- Kramnik Yudel  Belostok  Bialystok  Bialystok  Poland  born in 1896  Page of Testimony  Kramnik Sara  Bialystok  Bialystok  Bialystok  Poland born in 1898  Page of Testimony  Rysya Kramnik was born in Belostok, Poland in 1925 to Yudel and Sara. She was a pupil and single. Prior to WWII she lived in Belostok, Poland. During the war was in Belostok, Poland. Rysya died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 18/04/1997 by her sister Mrs. Kramnik was born in Belostok, Poland in 1923 to Yudel and Sara. She was single. Prior to WWII she lived in Belostok, Poland. During the war was in Belostok, Poland. She died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 18/04/1997 by her sister Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      KRAMNIK Father's First Name      YUDEL Mother's First Name      SARA Gender      FEMALE Date of Birth      1923 Place of Birth      BELOSTOK,BIALYSTOK,BIALYSTOK,POLAND Marital Status      SINGLE Place of Permanent Residence      BELOSTOK,BIALYSTOK,BIALYSTOK,POLAND Place During Wartime      BELOSTOK,BIALYSTOK,BIALYSTOK,POLAND Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      KRAMNIK Submitter's First Name      LYUBOV Relationship to victim      SISTER Date of Registration      18/04/1997 Language      RUSSIAN   Yenta Kramnik was born in Belostok, Poland in 1929 to Yudel and Sara was a pupil and a child. Prior to WWII lived in Belostok, Poland. During the war was in Belostok, Poland. Yenta died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 18/04/1997 by the victim's sister Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      KRAMNIK First Name      YENTA Father's First Name      YUDEL Mother's First Name      SARA Date of Birth      1929 Place of Birth      BELOSTOK,BIALYSTOK,BIALYSTOK,POLAND Marital Status      CHILD Place of Permanent Residence      BELOSTOK,BIALYSTOK,BIALYSTOK,POLAND Profession      PUPIL Place During Wartime      BELOSTOK,BIALYSTOK,BIALYSTOK,POLAND Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      KRAMNIK Submitter's First Name      LYUBOV Relationship to victim      SISTER Date of Registration      18/04/1997 Language      RUSSIAN   Kramnik Shosha  Belostok  Bialystok  Bialystok  Poland  1923  Page of Testimony   Kramnik Genrikh   Genrikh Kramnik was born in Minsk, Belorussia in 1921 to Moisei and Roza nee Zlotnik. He was a student and single. Prior to WWII he lived in Leningrad, Russia. During the war was in Army, Ussr. Genrikh died in 1941 in Petergof, Russia at the age of 20. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his brother from Netherlands KRAMNIK Submitter's First Name      SAMUIL Submitter's Country      NETHERLANDS Relationship to victim      BROTHER Kramnik Moisei  Leningrad  Leningrad  Leningrad  Russia  1894  Page of Testimony  from Netherlands KRAMNIK Submitter's First Name      SAMUIL Submitter's Country      NETHERLANDS Relationship to victim son y  Borodkin Ester nee Kramnik   Ester Borodkin nee Kramnik was born in Byten, Poland in 1905 to Berul. She was a worker. Prior to WWII she lived in Minsk, Belorussia. During the war was in Minsk, Belorussia. Ester died in Minsk, Belorussia. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her son; Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      BORODKIN Submitter's First Name      BORIS from Belarus Borodkin Semion   Semion Borodkin was born in Minsk, Belorussia in 1925 to Mordukh and Masha. He was a worker. Prior to WWII he lived in Minsk, Belorussia. During the war was in Minsk, Belorussia. Semion died in Minsk, Belorussia. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his brother from Belarus Submitter's Last Name      BORODKIN Submitter's First Name      BORIS from Belarus Kramnik Arnold   Arnold Kramnik was born in Orel, Russia in 1902 to Elia. He was an economist and married to Rakhil. Prior to WWII he lived in Moskva, Russia. During the war was in Moskva, Russia. Arnold died in 1942 in the Shoah at the age of 40. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his grandson Michael Michalson in Raanana (Brandes Street #4) Kramnik Tzilia   Tzilia nee Kramnik Khapov was born in Dukora, Belorussia in 1915 to Mendul. She was a student and married to Lev. Prior to WWII she lived in Ussuriysk, Russia. During the war was in Dukora, Belorussia. Tzilia died in 1941 in Dukora, Belorussia at the age of 26. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her spouse KHAPOV Submitter's First Name      LEV Relationship to victim      SPOUSE in Russia Khapov Valeri   Valeri Khapov was born in Kharkov, Ukraine in 1940 to Lev and Tzilia nee Kramnik. He was a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Ussuriysk, Russia. During the war was in Dukora, Belorussia. Valeri died in 1941 in Dukora, Belorussia at the age of 1. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his father -------------------------------------- Kramnik Josef   Josef Kramnik was born in Poland in 1874 to Yitzkhak Kramnik. He was a factory owner and married to Rivka nee Trap. Prior to WWII he lived in Wilno, Poland. and owned a factory. Josef died in 1939 in Wilno, Poland as the war started. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 03/01/1957 by his son KRAMNIK Submitter's First Name      YITZKHAK Relationship to victim      SON (Even Gvirol Street, #165 Tel Aviv) Date of Registration      03/01/1957 Kramnik Rywka nee Terep   Rywka Kramnik was born in Wilna, Poland in 1878 to Avigdor. She was a housewife and a widow of Yosef Kramnik. Prior to WWII she lived in Wilna, Poland. During the war was in Wilna. Rywka died in 1942 in Wilna (killed in Ponar). This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 03/01/1957 by her son Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      KRAMNIK Submitter's First Name      YITZKHAK Relationship to victim      SON (Even Gvirol Street, #165 Tel Aviv) Date of Registration      03/01/1957 Kramnik Miriam   Miriam Kramnik was born in Wilno, Poland in 1912 to Yosef and Rivka. She was single. Prior to WWII she lived in Wilno, Poland. During the war was in Wilno. Miriam died in 1942 in Wilno, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 03/01/1957 by her brother     KRAMNIK Submitter's First Name      YITZKHAK (Even Gvirol Street, #165 Tel Aviv) Kramnik Mira  Wilno  Wilno  Wilno  Poland  1915  Page of Testimony  ------------------------------------------------------------------- ---Kramnik Jacob   Jacob Kramnik was born in Swieciany, Poland in 1900 to Yehoshua Meir and Chana. He was married to Rivka. Prior to WWII he lived in Swieciany, Poland. During the war was in Swieciany, Poland. Jacob died in 1943 in Ponary, Poland at the age of 43. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1987 by his daughter from United states HIATT Submitter's maiden Name      KRAMNIK Submitter's First Name      RACHEL Submitter's First Name      FEIGA Submitter's Country     11 Elmwood St. Worcester, Mass. UNITED STATES Kramnik Riva   Riva Kramnik nee Opeskin was born in Swieciany, Poland in 1902 to Yehoshua and Rekha. She was married to Yaakov. Prior to WWII she lived in Swieciany, Poland. During the war was in Swieciany, Poland. Riva died in 1943 in Ponary, Poland at the age of 41. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her daughter from United states Kramnik Chaja   Chaja Kramnik was born in Swieciany, Poland in 1933 to Yaakov and Rivka nee Opeskin. She was a child. Prior to WWII she lived in Swieciany, Poland. During the war was in Swieciany, Poland. Chaja died in 1943 in Ponary, Poland at the age of 10. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1987 by her sister from United states Kramnik Szlome   Szlome Kramnik was born in Swieciany, Poland in 1936 to Yaakov and Rivka Opeskin. He was a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Swieciany, Poland. During the war was in Swieciany, Poland. Szlome died in 1943 in Ponary, Poland at the age of 7. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1987 by his sister from United states other sisters and a brother of HIATT Submitter's maiden Name      KRAMNIK Submitter's First Name      RACHEL FEIGA Submitter's Country     11 Elmwood St. Worcester, Mass. UNITED STATES; Kramnik Hannah  Swieciany  Swieciany  Wilno  Poland  1931  Page of Testimony  Kramnik Joshua  Swieciany  Swieciany  Wilno  Poland  1925  Page of Testimony  Kramnik Yetta  Swieciany  Swieciany  Wilno  Poland  1939  Page of Testimony    -------------------------------------- for more information go to
.http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/kramnik.html
- Wednesday, December 01, 2004 at 12:56:05 (EST)
Dorfand Itzhak   Itzhak Dorfand was born in Vashki, Lithuania. He was a shop owner and married to Hana. Prior to WWII he lived in Vashki, Lithuania. During the war was in Vashki, Lithuania. Itzhak died in Vashki, Lithuania at the age of 90. many of his family members were in israel and survived. He had six children. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/08/1999 by his granddaughter Rivka Vitkin Dorfan Ida nee Trapido   Ida Dorfan was born to Bluma and Noach Trapido. She was married to Nakhman. Prior to WWII she lived in Vashki, Lithuania. During the war was in Vashki, Lithuania. Ida died in the Shoah at the age of 35 with her husband and two children. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 10/03/1957 by her relative Rivka Vitkin of Ben Yehuda street 197, Tel Aviv Dorfan Nachman   Nachman Dorfan was born to Yitzkhak and Khana. He was a merchant and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Vaskai, Lithuania. During the war was in Vaskai, Lithuania. Nachman died in the Shoah at the age of 40 with children; Sara- age 10 and Chona -age 6. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 10/03/1957 by Rivka Vitkin (daughter of Nachman' brother; Moshe) Dorfand Boris   Boris Dorfand was born in Vashki, Lithuania in 1902 to Moshe and Henia. He was a bank manager (a graduate of law school) and married to Hella nee Ramnitz. Prior to WWII he lived in Posvol, Lithuania. Boris died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/08/1999 by his sister Rivka Vitkin (in Vitzo home for the elderly in Tel Aviv phone; 036940401) Hasia Levin   Hasia nee Dorfand Levin was born in Vaskai, Lithuania in 1905 to Moshe and Henia. Prior to WWII she lived in Kovna, Lithuania. During the war was in Kovna, Lithuania. She was married to Moshe Levin and had two children (Mordechai ; age10, Yosef age 5). Hasia died in Kovna, Lithuania. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/08/1999 by her sister from Israel Rivka Vitkin (in a home for the elderly in Tel Aviv) Lewin Moshe   Moshe Lewin was born to David. He was a factory owner and married to Chesiah nee Dorfan. Prior to WWII he lived in Kowno, Lithuania. During the war was in Kowno, Lithuania. Moshe died in the Shoah at the age of 45. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 10/03/1957 by his sister-in-law Dorfan Israel   Israel Dorfan was born to Moshe in 1907.He was a pharmacist and single. Prior to WWII he lived in Kowno, Lithuania. During the war was in Kowno, Lithuania. Israel died in the Shoah at the age of 34 This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 10/03/1957 by his sister Rivka Vitkin other Pages of Testimony by Rivka Vitkin; Trapida Chona  Vashki  Birzai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Trapida Noach  Vashki  Birzai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Trapida Chaim  Kowno  Kaunas    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Trapida Chaim  Kowno  Kaunas    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Dorfan Baruch  Pasvalys  Birzai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Dorfan Nachman  Vaskai  Birzai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Dorfan Ida  Vashki  Birzai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Dorfan Israel  Kowno  Kaunas    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Hasia  Kovna  Kaunas    Lithuania  1905  Page of Testimony  Dorfand Israel          1907  Page of Testimony  Dorfand Boris  Posvol  Birzai    Lithuania  1902  Page of Testimony  Dorfand Itzhak  Vashki  Birzai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Lewin Chasia  Kowno  Kaunas    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Dorfan Ela  Posvol  Birzai    Lithuania    Page of Testimony  Lewin Moshe  Kowno  Kaunas    Lithuania    Page of Testimony 
.
- Tuesday, November 30, 2004 at 22:16:17 (EST)
Today I called the Limon (Shlomo) family of Raanana. I found their phone # on the Yad Vashem site. In my grandparents album I found a picture of Asher Limon and also a picture of a pre- school that in the back said that one of the children was the son of Asher Limon (you could find both pictures on the Kurenets site http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pix/mementos/mem3_big.jpg). Shlomo Limon (born in 1946) is the son of Shmuel (son of Shlomo and Asnat of Kurenets?) Pages of Testimony by Shlomo Limon (and another cousin of Ashers' wife; Chaia Eshka nee Shkolnik). Limon Yehoshua Yehoshua Limon was born in Kornicz, Poland to Shlomo and Asna. He was married. Prior to WWII he lived in Kornicz, Poland. During the war was in Kornitz, Poland. Yehoshua died in 1942 in Kornicz, Poland his wife and daughter died on 9- 9- 1942. his son escaped that day to the forest and was killed in the forest some months later. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/07/2000 by his cousin LIMON Submitter's First Name SHLOMO of Raanana Relationship to victim COUSIN Date of Registration 20/07/2000 Is the Submitter a Survivor? NO Limon Asher Asher Limon was born in Kornic, Poland to Shlomo and Asnat. He was married to Khaia Eshka. Prior to WWII he lived in Kornitz, Poland. During the war was in Kornic, Poland. Asher died in 1942 in Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/07/2000 by his cousin LIMON Submitter's First Name SHLOMO Relationship to victim COUSIN Date of Registration 20/07/2000 Is the Submitter a Survivor? NO Limon Shlomo Shlomo Limon was born in Korenetz, Poland to Asher and Khaia Eshka. He was single. Prior to WWII he lived in Korenetz, Poland. During the war was in Korenetz, Poland. Shlomo died in 1942 in Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/07/2000 by his cousin LIMON Submitter's First Name SHLOMO Relationship to victim COUSIN Date of Registration 20/07/2000 Is the Submitter a Survivor? NO Limon Batia Batia Limon was born in Kornic, Poland to Asher and Khaia. She was single. Prior to WWII she lived in Kornic, Poland. During the war was in Kornic, Poland. Batia died in 1942 in Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/07/2000 by her cousin LIMON Submitter's First Name SHLOMO Relationship to victim COUSIN Date of Registration 20/07/2000 Is the Submitter a Survivor? NO Limon Chaja Eshka nee Shkolnik Chaja nee Shkolnik was born in Dokszyce, Poland in 1902 to Eliezer and Sheina. She was a housewife and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Korenetz, Poland. During the war was in Korenetz, Poland. Chaja died in 1942 in Korenetz, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 25/06/1957 by her cousin of Testimony Last Name nee SHKOLNIK Last Name LIMON First Name CHAJA First Name ESKI First Name KHAVA Father's First Name ELIEZER Mother's First Name SHEINA Mother's First Name* ILA Gender FEMALE Date of Birth 1902 Place of Birth DOKSZYCE,GLEBOKIE,WILNO,POLAND Marital Status MARRIED Name of 1st Child SHLOMO Age of 1st Child 14 Name of 2nd Child BATIA Age of 2nd Child 10 Place of Permanent Residence KORENETZ,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Profession HOUSEWIFE Place During Wartime KORENETZ,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Place of Death KORENETZ,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Date of Death 1942 Type of Material Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name KATZ Submitter's First Name KHAVIVA Relationship to victim COUSIN Date of Registration 25/06/1957 for picture of Shlomo, son of Asher and Chaia Eshke Limon (he is # 5 ) go to http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pix/mementos/mem3_big.jpg
http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pix/mementos/mem3_big.jpg
- Monday, November 29, 2004 at 13:27:14 (EST)
Message: Im a grandson of Benedykt Ra³owiec from Zbrzezie. Im searching for my family from all over the world. If You know something about my family or history, please send my iforamtion or contakt with me. Jakub Jan £ozowski jakub_lozowski@o2.pl
Jakub Jan £ozowski
Poland - Monday, November 29, 2004 at 12:49:50 (EST)
10 November 1850  Revision list Kurenets Vileika Vilnius  DYNERSHTEIN  Itsko son of Abram  Head of Household   born in 1817   DYNERSHTEIN  Seina  daughter of Todres  Wife  born in 1820      DYNERSHTEIN  Beilia  daughter of Itsko and Seina  born in 1843       DYNERSHTEIN  Freida daughter of Itsko and Seina  born in 1845       DYNERSHTEIN  Goda daughter of Itsko and Seina   born in 1849       DYNERSHTEIN  Shimshel Dovid Son of Itsko (and Seina?)  born in 1837     The rest are all from Rechki Vileika Vilnius  DYNERSHTEIN Uria son of Itska Head of Household  born in 1808 died 1836  DYNERSHTEIN  Abram son of Iosel  relation unknown to head of Household  born in 1796 (could he be father of Itsko son of Abram born in 1817 with his first wife?)   DYNERSHTEIN  Masia daughter of Iankel   born in 1810     wife of Abram  DYNERSHTEIN  Meita  daughter of Abram   born in 1831      DYNERSHTEIN  Braina daughter of Abram   born in 1835       DYNERSHTEIN  Doba daughter of Abram   born in 1839       DYNERSHTEIN  Khasia daughter of Abram   born in 1842  DYNERSHTEIN  Movsha son of Abram  born in 1843      DYNERSHTEIN  Liba daughter of Abram      born in 1846  DYNERSHTEIN  Gilel  son of Abram  born in 1828  was missing    DYNERSHTEIN Iosel son of Abram  born in 1819  (must be with the first wife of Abram)  died 1846    DYNERSHTEIN  Girsha son of Iosel   born in 1837 DYNERSHTEIN  Tana son of Iosel  born in 1839       DYNERSHTEIN  Leia  daughter of Iosel    born in 1843            --------------------------------------------------------   DYNERSHTEIN  Borukh son of Girsha  Head of Household   born in 1801      DYNERSHTEIN  Khana  daughter of Zelik  Wife  born in 1810       DYNERSHTEIN  Khaim  son of Borukh  born in 1809 (his father was only 8 years old when he was born?!)      DYNERSHTEIN  Reiza  Srol  Daughter-in-law   born in 1810     wife of Khaim  DYNERSHTEIN  Gendel  son of Borukh  Son  born in 1819 (all dates here must be reported wrong)       DYNERSHTEIN  Rokha daughter of Iankel  Daughter-in-law   born in 1825     wife of Gendel  DYNERSHTEIN  Aron son of Iankel  uncle born in 1767  died 1849     DYNERSHTEIN  Leiba son of Aron  born in 1810   died 1848    -----------------------------------   DYNERSHTEIN  Iokhel  son of Itska  Head of Household  born in 1761   died in 1847    DYNERSHTEIN  Abram son of Iokhel  born in 1811     DYNERSHTEIN  Ginda  daughter of Shmuila  Daughter-in-law    born in 1820     wife of Abram  DYNERSHTEIN  Mendel son of Iokhel  born in 1819      DYNERSHTEIN  Merka  daughter of Abel  Daughter-in-law    born in 1822     wife of Mendel  DYNERSHTEIN  Mina  daughter of Mendel  Grand-daughter    born in 1849 -      DYNERSHTEIN Berko son of Leizer  unknown realation born in 1808   died 1848  --------------------------------------  DYNERSHTEIN  Iosel son of Sholom  Head of Household   born in 1788     DYNERSHTEIN  Dovid  son of Iosel  born in 1824 died 1849    DYNERSHTEIN  Khaim son of Sholom  Brother of   Iosel born in 1803       DYNERSHTEIN  Malka daughter of Itsko  Sister-in-law  born in 1810 Khaims' wife     ---------------------------------------------- Rechki Vileika Vilnius  DYNERSHTEIN  Aizik son of Berko  Head of Household  born in 1796 DYNERSHTEIN  Sosia  daughter of Gerts  Wife  born 1800       DYNERSHTEIN  Berko  son of Aizik  born in 1821     DYNERSHTEIN  Tauba  daughter of Iosel  Daughter-in-law   born in 1825     wife of Berko  DYNERSHTEIN  Khaika daughter of Berko  Grand-daughter   of Aizik born in 1845       DYNERSHTEIN  Movsha son of Aizik  born in 1824   in 1839 was recruited    DYNERSHTEIN  Girsha  son of Iosel  unknown relation born in 1803   died in 1848    DYNERSHTEIN  Abram son of Girsha  born in 1829 died 1848     DYNERSHTEIN  Aron son of Girsha  unknown relation born in 1787       ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Rechki Vileika Vilnius  DYNERSHTEIN  Afroim  son of Iosel Head of Household born in 1792   DYNERSHTEIN  Abram Son of Afroim  born in 1821  unknown where he is since 1840    DYNERSHTEIN  Itsko  Son of Afroim    born in 1834      Brother; DYNERSHTEIN  Neukh Son of Iosel   born in 1792   died 1849  DYNERSHTEIN  Abram Son of Neukh  Nephew  born in 1829  died 1847     DYNERSHTEIN  Dovid son of Khaim  unknown relation born in 1768   died 1836    DYNERSHTEIN  Movsha Son of Dovid  unknown relation to Head of Household born in 1796    died 1846    DYNERSHTEIN  Faibish  Son of Movsha  born in 1825  unknown where he was since 1849   ( Abraham, since it is the same names as your family it might be relation to you)
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- Sunday, November 28, 2004 at 11:43:06 (EST)
Dear Eilat,   Two weeks ago I returned from Poland , the tour cause me to search my roots. Do you have more sources than theYizkor book of Vileyka?   Best regards, Abraham Dinur (Dinershtein) , son of Faywish Dinershtein----------------- Dear Abraham, ....I talked with Yente nee Dinerstein Baranovitz in Cholon and she said about your family "Moshe Natan Dinerstein (First cousin to Yentes' father, Leib  son of Gotlieb Dinerstein) died before the war, his wife Shifra with son Yakov, daughter Gitel, and son Avraham- Leib perished." notes that I have on the Dinersteins.... It seems that all the Dinersteins originated in a little place Rechki near Vileika. In the list of the perished in the Yizkor books of the area we found seven Dinerstein families who perished in Kurenets, Aharon Meirovitch told me of Seven Dinerstein families in Vilejka who perished, one perished in Volozhin (also first cousin of your grandfather), others in Molodechna and Smorgon (also first cousin of your grandfather). most seem to be somehow related. They could have all been descendants of the six Rechki families of a hundred years before, and there should be many more Dinerstein families after such a long period. Vileyka Yizkor book: there are a few pictures of Dinersteins. Noach Dinerstein sister wrote about him page 150 (The partisan) - She lived in Israel when she wrote it, her name is Chana Morberger . Noach parents who perished were Yosef- Leib and Miryam and another son who perished was Yizhak - Chanan. Moshe Natan Dinerstein (First cousin to Yentes' father, Leib Dinerstein) died before the war, his wife Shifra with son Yakov, daughter Gitel, and son Avraham- Leib perished. Also his son Chanan with his wife and children perished. Another Dinerstein family is of Nisan Dinerstein who died before the war, his wife Rivka, their sons; Shalom and Natan their daughters Gitel and Lola perished. Another was Zev Dinerstein with wife and daughter. another Dinerstein was Avraham with his daughter in law Rivka and her son Baruch (Baba) - I would say that most of the Dinersteins in Vileyka were related- they have the same first names. S. Dinerstein wrote on page 33 about the library. I found this on site for Jewish partisans; ...".On our way to the various actions, I had a few bizarre encounters with Jewish women who tried to pass as Christians and might have had to pay for this with their lives. Once I met two Jewish women from Minsk who had been caught by partisans and accused of spying, and only after I had questioned them for a long time, because I suspected they were Jewish, did they admit their identity and thus were saved. On another occasion I met a Jewish girl, Leah Dinerstein who lived in one of the caves under the name of Lydka Baydak and behaved like a real anti-Semite to cover up." http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pinsk/Pin2-05.html The story of David Plotnik http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/dinnerstein.html Your submition; Dinershtein* Shifra   Shifra Dinershtein was born in Vileika, Poland. She was married to Moshe Natan. Shifra died in Vileika, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 15/12/2000 by her grandson DINUR Submitter's Last Name*      DINERSHTEIN Submitter's First Name      AVRAHAM your fathers' Dinershtein* Shifra            Page of Testimony  Szyfra Dinersztein nee Kohen was born in Wilejka, Poland to Avraham and Faya. She was a housewife and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Wilejka, Poland. During the war was in Wilejka, Poland. Szyfra died in 1942 in Wielun, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 05/10/1955 by her son, Dinerstein Feybel who lived in Globokie during the war, a Shoah survivor who Submitted the testement in Kiryat Byalik Dinersztejn Abram Arje   Abram Dinersztejn was born in Wilejka, Poland in 1906 to Moshe Natan and Shifra. He was a tailor and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Wilejka, Poland. During the war was in Wilejka, Poland. Abram died in 1942 in Wilejka, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 05/12/1955 by his brother, a Shoah survivor Submitter's Last Name      DINERSHTEIN Submitter's First Name*      FEIBUSH Relationship to victim      BROTHER 05/12/1955 Dinersztejn Jakow   Jakow Dinersztejn was born in Wilejka, Poland in 1913 to Moshe Natan and Shifra. He was single. Prior to WWII he lived in Wilejka, Poland. During the war was in Wilejka, Poland. Jakow died in 1942 in Wilejka, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 05/12/1955 by his brother, a Shoah survivor Dinersztejn Chone   Chone Dinersztejn was born in Wilejka, Poland in 1911 to Moshe Natan and Shifra. He was a tailor and married to Sharl. Prior to WWII he lived in Wilejka, Poland. During the war was in Wilejka, Poland. Chone died in 1944 in Wilejka, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 05/12/1955 by his brother, a Shoah survivor Dinerstein Feybel who lived in Globokie before the war,  a Shoah survivor in Kiryat Byalik Dinersztejn Gitel  Wilejka  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1923  Page of Testimony  Gitel. Dinersztejn was born in Wilejka, Poland in 1923 to Moshe Nathan and Shifra. She was single. Prior to WWII she lived in Wilejka, Poland. During the war was in Wilejka, Poland. She died in 1942 in Wilejka, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 05/12/1955 by her brother Dinerstein Feybel who lived in Globokie before the war, a Shoah survivor who lived in 1955 Dinersztejn Serel  Kurenets  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Serel Dinersztejn was born in Kurenets, Poland. She was a housewife and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Serel died in 1942 in Kurenets, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 05/12/1955 by her brother-in-law, a Shoah survivor Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      DINERSZTEJN Last Name      DINERSHTEIN First Name      SEREL First Name      SHARL Maiden Name*      ALPEROVITZ Gender      FEMALE Place of Birth      KURENETS,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Marital Status      MARRIED Place of Permanent Residence      KURENETS,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND  Place of Death      KURENETS,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Date of Death      1942 Submitter's       DINERSHTEIN  FEIBUSH Relationship to victim      BROTHER-IN-LAW Date of Registration      05/12/1955 Is the Submitter a Survivor?      YES Dinershtein Leib    ( first cousin of your grandfather)      Leib Dinershtein was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1879 to Gotlib and Yenta. He was a commercial agent. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Leib died in 1942 in Kurenets, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his daughter Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      DINERSHTEIN First Name      LEIB Father's First Name      GOTLIB Mother's First Name      YENTA Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1879 Place of Birth      KURENETS,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Spouse's  Name      SARA Spouse's Maiden Name      GURFINKEL Profession      COMMERCIAL AGENT for Singer Place During Wartime      KURENETS,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Date of Death      1942 Submitter's Last Name*      LEVIN Submitter's First Name      RAKHEL Relationship to victim      DAUGHTER other daughter;Yanta Baranovitz of Cholon and a son Gershon lived in Rehovot. (his son is Ariel Dinur) Gotlib and Yenta two other children; Dinershtein Natan  (another first cousin of your grandfather) Natan Dinershtein was born in Korzeniec, Poland to Gotlib and Yenta. He was a tailor and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Wolozin, Poland. Natan died in Wolozin, Poland at the age of 55. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 25/04/1999 by his niece, a Shoah survivor Ashinobski Khana  (another first cousin of your grandfather) Smorgon  Oszmiana  Wilno  Poland  1884  Page of Testimony  Khana Ashinobski nee Dinershtein was born in Kurenitz, Poland in 1884 to Gotlib and Yenta. She was a farmer and married to Yerakhmiel nee Ashinobski. Prior to WWII she lived in Smorgon, Poland. During the war was in Smorgon, Poland. Khana died in 1943 in Ponarek, Poland at the age of 59. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 25/04/1999 by her daughter, a Shoah survivor Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      ASHINOBSKI First Name      KHANA Maiden Name      DINERSHTEIN Father's First Name      GOTLIB Mother's First Name      YENTA Gender      FEMALE Date of Birth      1884 Age      59 Place of Birth      KORNITZ,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Marital Status      MARRIED Spouse's First Name      YERAKHMIEL Spouse's Maiden Name      ASHINOBSKI Place of Permanent Residence      SMORGON,OSZMIANA,WILNO,POLAND Profession      FARMER Place During Wartime      SMORGON,OSZMIANA,WILNO,POLAND Place of Death      PONAREK,WILNO,WILNO,POLAND Date of Death      04/1943 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      MASHINSKI Submitter's First Name      TZILA Relationship to victim      DAUGHTER Date of Registration      25/04/1999 Is the Submitter a Survivor?      YES Dinershtein Sara (wife of Leib)   Sara Dinershtein nee Gurfinkel was born in Minsk, Belorussia in 1878. She was a housewife and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Minsk, Belorussia. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Sara died in 1942 in Kurzeniec, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her daughter Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name*      LEVIN Submitter's First Name      RAKHEL Relationship to victim      DAUGHTER Dinersztajn Noach   Noach Dinersztajn was born in Poland. Prior to WWII he lived in Wilieka, Poland. Nech died in the Shoah at the age of 25. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 21/06/1957 by Lea Kohen Dynersztejn Pesza  Korzeniec      Poland  1921  Page of Testimony  Pesza Dynersztejn was born in Korzeniec, Poland in 1921 to Leib and Dvora. She was single. Prior to WWII she lived in Korzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Korzeniec, Poland. Pesza died in 1941 in Korzeniec, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 15/07/1957 by her neighbour GELEROVITZ GENYA Markman Chane   Chane Markman nee Dinerstein was born in Kurenets, Poland to Smuel. She was married to Welwl. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Chane died in 1942 in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/01/1978 by her so Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      MARKMAN Submitter's First Name      BORUCH Relationship to victim      SON Date of Registration      28/01/1978 Kantor Sara   Sara Kantor nee Dinershtein was born in Wilno, Poland in 1881 to Gabriel and Dina. She was married. Prior to WWII she lived in Wilno, Poland. During the war was in Kaunas, Lithuania. Sara died in 1941 in Kaunas, Lithuania. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/06/1955 by her daughter Dinersztajn Beniamin   Beniamin Dinersztajn was born in Horodok, Poland in 1907 to Yosef. He was a merchant and married to Dvora nee Kanter. Prior to WWII he lived in Horodok, Poland. During the war was in Horodok, Poland. Beniamin died in 1942 in Horodok, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 25/04/1957 by his sister other notes; On the Ellis Island records list,Gitel Dinerstein from Minsk (#44) is definitely my maternal grandmother.(44. Gitel Dinerstein Minsk, Russia 1907 age-18) I have read the ship's manifest and that is definitely my grandmother. She was actually 14 (not 18) when she arrived, but most certainly lied about her age in order to be able to work,or to just get on the ship. Gitel, who became Gussie Denerstein, and later Gussie Kessler, was on her way to stay with her brother Morris and his wife Rose in Brooklyn. I'm still trying to find out when Morris (Moishe) came to America. Gitel had two other brother who came here before her. In America they were Louis and Isidore. She also had a married sister, Sara Ruchel Rubin, who came to join her husband Nathan in Kansas City. Gitel's father was Yakov Dinerstein, don't know the name of her mother. In addition to her parents, there were at least two sisters (Chaya Riva and Dinke, I believe) who remained in Minsk. There may have been a brother as well. As far as I know, no one knew what became of them, but I believe it was assumed they died in the Holocaust. Steve Rosen and you have me convinced that the family may have originated from one of the shtetls you speak of, perhaps Kurenets. I am anxious to continue reading all the stories on your site. Thanks again for all the hard work on your web site. Karen Blickstein I will look for more ionformation (the revision list for Dinerstein in the year 1850 is on line.... Eilat
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- Sunday, November 28, 2004 at 09:41:09 (EST)
Today I talked with Sara ALPEROVITZ in Haifa. Sara is the widow of Yehoshua of Kurenets who died in 1995. Yehoshua has done much to the memory of Kurenets. He wrote a story in the Yizkor book; Lost Tunes http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurenets/kur095.html I am posting here just a little of it; ..... To this day I have a great love for music. When I walk down the street and hear an instrument played proficiently, my heart widens. I don't just enjoy hearing others play, I play a few instruments myself. It was in you, my little hometown, Kurenets, that I first heard songs and music played, and this was even before I got to know the professional players of Kurenets, the Kleizmers from Smorgon Street. I was about three years old, we lived on Myadel St. across the street from Hillel Kramnik, the father of Yosef Shimon who perished in the Holocaust [and his brother who moved to the US and changed his name to Kramer and lived in northern NY]. Not far from us, in the alley, lived Gotza (Dinerstein?), and from his house you would hear the sound of a violin being played. These tunes had a great pull on me, making me stop over at that house. And one time, when I walked over to the house with my mother, ZL, I stopped her and I started crying and begged her that she should let me see what it is in that house that made that beautiful sounds. At first my mother refused, but finally she could not take my cries. She entered the house and apologized. She said to Gotza's family, A child will stay a child. He doesn't let me continue walking, he demands that we should enter to see what is it in this house that makes that music. We were received graciously. Gotza Dinerstein was a Jew who knew how to entertain children and the old. He sat me on a high chair and started playing music for me. At first I was very embarrassed since all of a sudden I Became the center of attention and all the eyes were upon me, but slowly I got more acquainted with the place and the people who lived there. From that day, I would come every day to listen to the music. One day I sat in Gotza's house for a long time and I fell asleep. During my sleep I somehow fell on the floor under the table and no one paid any attention, so I lay there in this sort of hideout and slept for a long time. Nighttime came and I didn't return home so they started looking for me. They went to Gotza's house but they couldn't find me. Gotza's family said that I was there much earlier but I left without them noticing. There was a great worry in town and they looked for me at all the neighbors' houses. Finally I woke up from under the table and started crying, so they took me out with great excitement and brought me home. When I was about seven or eight, my two much older brothers, Yakov Hirshl and Berl David, came from Harkov, deep in Russia, and brought with them a mandolin. My brothrYakov Hirshl during the First World War was lost and we never heard from him again. Anyway, back to the days before WWI. This was the first mandolin in Kurenets. My brother would play the mandolin and I would listen. Slowly I became more courageous and started playing, and became very proficient, so now other children would come to our windows to listen to my playing and they looked at me with envy. Many children were envious of me, but I envied others. Who? I particularly envied the Kleizmers on Smorgon Street..... go to http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurenets/kur095.html for the rest.... I found the phone number of Sara Alperovitz after looking at the Yad Vashem site - she posted information about her husbands family (he also did and also submitted some pictures- and I am posting it here) Alperowics Moshe Binyamin   Moshe Binyamin Alperowics was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1866 to Khanokh and Reicha Dvora. He was a merchant and married to Chaia Tzipi. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Moshe Binyamin died in 1942 in Kurenets, Poland at the age of 76. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his son Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      ALPEROVITZ Submitter's First Name      YEHOSHUA Relationship to victim      SON Alperovitz Khaim Zalman   Khaim Zalman Alperovitz was born in Korenetz, Poland in 1906 to Moshe Binyamin and Khaia Zipa. He was married to Khana Zipa (the daughter of his brother; Berl David, who left to Argentina before the war). Prior to WWII he lived in Korenetz, Poland. Khaim Zalman his wife and child died in 1941 in Wilejka Chaim Zalman was at the age of 36. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 11/01/2001 by Sara Alperovitz Pages of Testimony Name      ALPEROWICH HAIM ZALMEN Father's Name      MOSHE BENIAMIN     Mother's Name      KHAIA TZIPI Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1903 Age      40 Place of Birth      KURENETS,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Marital Status      MARRIED Spouse's First Name      TZIPI     KHANA Place of Permanent Residence      KURENETS,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Place During Wartime      WILEJKA,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Place of Death      WILEJKA,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Date of Death      18/02/1943 with wife and child Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      ALPEROVITZ Submitter's First Name      YEHOSHUA Relationship to victim      BROTHER Alperowics Chana Tzipi   Chana Tzipi Alperowics was born in Oszmiana, Poland in 1919 to Berl David (brother of Yehoshua who left his family and went to Argentina) and Rivka. She was a shoemaker and married to Chaim Zalman (her uncle). Prior to WWII she lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Tzipi died in 1943 in Wilejka, Poland at the age of 24. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her father ' brother as well as her brother in law. three of her brothers survived and came to Israel after the war; Gershon, Dvorka Katzselgros and Arie (who was born after his father went to Argentina. Alperowics Malca   Malca Alperowics was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1910 as the youngest daughter to Moshe Binyamin and Chaia Tzipi. She was a housewife and single. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Malca died in 1942 in Kurenets, Poland at the age of 32. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her brother; Yehoshua Brother; of Yehoshua by the name of Zvi Hirsh was lost in Russia after the first World war. Alperowich Reuven Zishka   Reuven Alperowich was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1898 to Khanokh and Reicha Dvora. He was a merchant and married to Merka nee Shkolnik (sister of Meir Shkolnik). Prior to WWII he lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Reuven died in 1943 in the forests in the eastern part of Belarus/ Poland at the age of 45. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his nephew Pages of Testimony Last Name      ALPEROWICH Last Name      ALPEROVITZ First Name      REUVEN First Name      ZISKIND Father's First Name      KHANOKH Mother's First Name      REICHA Mother's First Name      RAIKHA Mother's First Name      DVORA Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1898 Age      45 Place of Birth      KURENETS,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Marital Status      MARRIED Spouse's First Name      MERKA Place of Permanent Residence      KURENETS,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Profession      MERCHANT Place During Wartime      KURENETS,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Place of Death      KURENETS,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Date of Death      1943 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      ALPEROVITZ Submitter's First Name      YEHOSHUA Relationship to victim      NEPHEW His children; Alperowics Eliahu (Elik)  Oszmiana  Oszmiana  Wilno  Poland  1922 Alperowich Eliahu   Eliahu Alperowich was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1925 to Reuven Zishka and Merka nee Shkolnik. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Eliahu died in 1942 nearn Kurenets, Poland at the age of 18 while fighting as a partisan in the forest. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his cousin Yehoshua Alperowich Avraham  Kurenets  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1929  Alperowich Avraham   Avraham Alperowich was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1929 to Reuven and Merka Shkolnik. He was a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Avraham died in 1943 near Kurenets, Poland at the age of 14 (he was hiding with his parents in the forest in eastern Belarus). This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his cousin Alperowich Mordekhai (Motik)  Kurenets  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1927  Alperowich Mordekhai   Mordekhai Alperowich was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1927 to Reuven and Merka Shkolnik. He was a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Mordekhai died in 1943 near Kurenets, Poland at the age of 16 he was fighting as a member of the partisans in Eastern Belarus. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his cousin Alperowics Marisha Ester   Marisha Ester Alperowics was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1897 to Khanokh and Reicha Dvora. She was single. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Marisha died in 1942 in Kurenets, Poland at the age of 45. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted bySubmitter's Last Name      ALPEROVITZ Submitter's First Name      YEHOSHUA Relationship to victim      NEPHEW Perec Israel   Israel Perec was born in Warszawa, Poland in 1882 to Avraham and Sara. He was a waggoner and married to Beila the daughter of Khanokh and Reicha Dvora.Alperovitz. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Israel died in 1942 in Kurenets, Poland at the age of 60. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1985 by his nephew Last Name      ALPEROVITZ Submitter's First Name      YEHOSHUA Relationship to victim      NEPHEW (his wife was the sister of my father, Moshe Binyamin) Perec Moshe  Kurenets  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1920  Page of Perec Beila Ytka   Beila Perec nee Alperovich was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1892 to Khanokh and Raikha Dvora. She was a waggoner and married to Israel. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Beila died in 1942 in Kurenets, Poland at the age of 50. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her brothers' son Yehoshua. Perec Moshe   Moshe Perec was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1920 to Israel and Beila Ytka Alperovich. He was single. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Moshe died in 1942 in Kurenets, Poland at the age of 22. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his cousin Region   Country   Birth Date   Source   Perec Zevulun  Kurenets  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1922  Page of Testimony Perec Zevulun   Zevulun Perec was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1922 to Israel and Beila Alperovich. He was single. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Zevulun died in 1942 in Kurenets, Poland at the age of 20. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1985 by his cousin Perec Rakhel  Kurenets  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1924  Page of Testimony  Perec Rakhel   Rakhel Perec was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1924 to Israel and Beila nee Alperovich. She was single. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Rakhel died in 1942 in Kurenets, Poland at the age of 18. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1985 by her cousin Yehoshua Perec David  Kurenets  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1923  Page of Testimony  Perec David   David Perec was born in Kurenets, Poland in 1923 to Israel and Beila Alperovich. He was single. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurenets, Poland. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. David died in 1942 in Kurenets, Poland at the age of 19. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1985 by his cousin For Yehoshua story;
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurenets/kur095.html
- Saturday, November 27, 2004 at 18:00:34 (EST)
Some notes that I received today...................-Was doing a search on the internet when I saw this.  My father and his family were from Wiljeka Poland.  His name was Kopelovitz, not sure how they spelled it in English.  However, I would like to have a copy of this book, can you tell me how to get it and if I could get the English translation, I would appreciate reading about it.  All I remember was my father said it was 7 years Poland, 7 years Russia.  They came in the morning to pick up the dead and put them in carts.  Any help would be appreciated.  Thank you so much Judy Lieff --------------Dear Eilat, Thank you very much for this (Szepsenwol in the Vilna area in Yad Vashem ) , and for the Dinersteins.  It is am amazing tool (Yad Vashem site).  How are you? The only geneaology I am doing at the moment is research on the jewish history of Nicholas Sarkozy, who may become the President of France.  His family origin is Salonika and then Paris. --Steve Rosen ------------ came across your web site and have been trying to trace my ancestors who came form "somewhere near Minsk". My Greatgrandfather was Avrum Chodos he had ten children: Shepsel (died in Russia),Shia, Velvil, Dora, Max (my grandfather),Morris, Anna, Jennie, Joseph, Rusha (Rose). The first five were by first wife Zisha Portnick; second five by second wife (don't know name). I'm trying to find out when they came to USA. I believe it was around the turn of the century. In your list for the Chadash family I can identify Fay (my mother), Max (grandfather), Morris (his brother), Nathan (my dad), Sarah (an aunt), Greenfield (a cousin-Dora's daughter). On page 9 the Family starting with Max is mine. "Mannie" should be "Mammie", "Katha" should be "Nathan". Any help would be appreaciated. I think your site is great. Steven Chodos--------------------- I was advised to contact you regarding shtetl of ILYA.  My father was born in Gorodok, at least that's what he told me.  His father was Chaim Rabinowitz and his mother was Feige Gitlin.  I have no clue which shtetl he was from.  My GGF, Israel Gitlin was a rabbi or at least very learned, as I have a picturs of him sitting next to a desk, garbed in black with a high-top yarmulke with a book in front of him.  I was told he was a rabbi.  He may be been from Vilna, but I'm not sure. Any help you could give me or I could you, please contact me. My grandfather Chaim Rabinowitz can to American in decembe 1906 on the PETERSBERG from Libau.  My grandma and the 4 children came to the U.S. in Oct. 1911 on the Sirma also brom Libau.   I have their inspection cards from their ships. They are also in the Ellis Island listing.  There was an entire group from their shtetl including another name of Adelman and they all settled in Canton, Ohio. Thanking you in advance . Leslie(Robbins) Wohl-----------
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- Friday, November 26, 2004 at 21:35:48 (EST)
Meer Dudman was born in Wiszniew, Poland to Beniamin and Galia. He was a barber and a widower. Prior to WWII he lived in Wiszniew, Poland. During the war was in Wiszniew, Poland. Meer died in 1942 in Wiszniew, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 19/10/1956 by his sister' son Submitter's Last Name      ABRAMSON Submitter's First Name      KHAIM Relationship to victim      RELATIVE Date of Registration      19/10/1956 Josef Dudman was born in Wiszniew, Poland in 1900 to Meir and Khava. He was a barber and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Wiszniew, Poland. During the war was in Wiszniew, Poland. Josef died in 1942 in Wiszniew, Poland. he was married and had 3 children. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 19/07/1956 by his cousin Eljaszkewicz Tajbl nee Dudman   Tajbl Eljaszkewicz was born in Wiszniew, Poland in 1898 to Meir and Khava. She was a housewife and married to Yaakov Hirsh Eljaszkewicz and had two sons. . Prior to WWII she lived in Wiszniew, Poland. During the war was in Wiszniew, Poland. Tajbl died in 1942 in Wiszniew, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 19/10/1956 by her cousin Sziszko Szima   Szima Sziszko was born in Wiszniew, Poland in 1890 to Tzvi Ytzhak and Ester Rosa nee Dudman. She was a housewife and married to David. Prior to WWII she lived in Borysowka, Poland. During the war was in Iwie, Poland. Szima died in 1942 in Iwie, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 12/10/1956 by her brotherSubmitter's Last Name      ABRAMSON Submitter's First Name      KHAIM Relationship to victim      brother Date of Registration      19/10/1956 Sziszko Dawid   Dawid Sziszko was born in Trabi, Poland. He was a farmer and married to Szima/ Sara nee Abramson. Prior to WWII he lived in Borysowka, Poland. During the war was in Iwje, Poland. Dawid died in 1942 in Iwje, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 19/05/1956 by his brother-in-law Manusewicz Nechama   Nechama Manusewicz was born in Rakow, Poland in 1912 to Avraham and Gita. She was a housewife and married to Menashe and had one child. Prior to WWII she lived in Rakow, Poland. During the war was in Rakow, Poland. Nechama died in 1942 in Rakow, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 25/10/1956 by her brother-in-law Submitter's Last Name      ABRAMSON Submitter's First Name      KHAIM Relationship to victim      brother-in-law Date of Registration      19/10/1956
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- Tuesday, November 23, 2004 at 23:38:46 (EST)
Shishko Samuel-   Samuel Shishko was born in Wiszniew, Poland in 1885 to Nisan. He was a merchant and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Gomel, Belorussia. During the war was in Gomel, Belorussia. Samuel died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 24/01/1956 by the brother of his wife    Pages of Testimony Last Name      SISKO Last Name*      SHISHKO First Name      SHMUEL First Name      SAMUEL Father's First Name      NISAN Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1885 Place of Birth      WISZNIEW,POLAND Marital Status      MARRIED Spouse's First Name*      ESTER Spouse's Maiden Name      YANUS Place of Permanent Residence      GOMEL,GOMEL,GOMEL,BELORUSSIA Profession      MERCHANT Place During Wartime      GOMEL,GOMEL,GOMEL,BELORUSSIA Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      YANUS Submitter's First Name      MEIR Relationship to victim      the brother in law- lives in Shaar Haemek Street #6 Natania Date of Registration      24/01/1956 Sisko Etul   Etul Sisko was born in Kovno, Lithuania in 1887 to Shlomo. She was a housewife and married to Shmuel. Prior to WWII she lived in Gomel, Belorussia. During the war was in Gomel, Belorussia. Etul died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 29/01/1956 by her brother Submitter's Last Name      YANUS Submitter's First Name      MEIR lives in Shaar Haemek Street #6 Natania ---------------------- Shishko Shmuel   Shmuel Shishko was born in Vishnevo, Poland in 1887. He was married to Batia. Prior to WWII he lived in Minsk, Belorussia. During the war was in Minsk, Belorussia. Shmuel died in 1941 in Minsk at the age of 54. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his son or daughter (also picture submitted) Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      SHISHKO First Name      SHMUEL Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1887 Age      54 Place of Birth      VISHNEVO,WOLOZYN,NOWOGRODEK,POLAND Marital Status      MARRIED Spouse's First Name      BATIA Place of Permanent Residence      MINSK,MINSK CITY,MINSK,BELORUSSIA Place During Wartime      MINSK,MINSK CITY,MINSK,BELORUSSIA Place of Death      MINSK,GHETTO Date of Death      07/11/1941 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      SHISHKO Submitter's First Name      ANA or Yona in Jerusalem in a new immigrant place Shishko Khaia  Minsk  Minsk City  Minsk  Belorussia  1926  Page of Testimony  Shishko Batia  Minsk  Minsk City  Minsk  Belorussia  1892  Page of Testimony  Szyszko Riwa   Riwa Szyszko was born in Poland in 1877. She was a housewife and married. Her husband died before the war. Prior to WWII she lived in Wisznewe, Poland. During the war was in Wisznewe. Riwa died in 1942 in Wisznewe. they had 1 child? This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 24/07/1957 by her community member Ryjer Chaja nee Shishko   Chaja Ryjer was born in Ilja, Poland in 1885 to Yona Shishko from Vishnevo. She was a baker and married. Prior to WWII she lived in Ilja, Poland. During the war was in Ilja, Poland. Chaja died in 1942 in Ilja, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 10/04/1956 by her son, Yona Riar a Shoah survivor.   Submitter's Last Name*      REIER Submitter's First Name      YONA lived in Shikun Zaria in Tel Baruch - I transalated the story of his wife; Bat Sheva on the Ilja site. He also wrote about his family and there are pictures on the Ilja site. Relationship to victim      SON Date of Registration      10/04/1956 Is the Submitter a Survivor?      YES Shishko Menashe   Menashe Shishko was born in Borysowka, Volozhin, Poland in 1932 to Shmuel Gimpel and Khaia. He was a pupil and a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Borysowka, Poland. Menashe died in 1942 in Iwie at the age of 10. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his aunt Rivka Aloni (Shishko ) Karkur Israel   She also gave information on;   Shishko Shmuel Gimpl Shmuel Gimpl Shishko was born in Borysowka, Volozhin Poland in 1896 to Asher and Yokheved nee Brodno. He was a flourmiller and married to Khaia. Prior to WWII he lived in Borysowka, Poland. Gimpl died in 1942 in Iwje, Poland at the age of 46. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his sister Rivka Aloni Karkur/ Kfar Pines     Shishko Ezra   Ezra Shishko was born in Borysowka, Poland in 1925 to Shmuel Gimpel and Khaia. He was a pupil and single. Prior to WWII he lived in Borysowka, Poland. Ezra died in 1942 in Iwje, Poland at the age of 17. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his aunt Shishko Sonia   Sonia Shishko was born in Borysowo, Poland in 1927 to Shmuel Gimpel and Khaia. She was a pupil and a child. Prior to WWII she lived in Borysowo, Poland. Sonia died in 1942 in Iwje, Poland at the age of 15. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her aunt Shishko Asher  Borysowo  Wolozyn  Nowogrodek  Poland  1937  Page of Testimony  Shishko Asher   Asher Shishko was born in Borysowo, Poland in 1937 to Shmuel and Khaia. He was a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Borysowo, Poland. Asher died in 1942 in Iwje, Poland at the age of 5. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1986 by his aunt Shishko Rakhel          1898  Page of Testimony  Shishko Rakhel Chaia   Rakhel Shishko was born in Traby, Poland in 1898. She was a housewife and married to Shmuel Gimpl. Rakhel died in 1942 in Iwje, Poland at the age of 44. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1986 by her sister-in-law Shishko Shalom  Borysowo  Wolozyn  Nowogrodek  Poland  1910  Page of Testimony Shishko Shalom   Shalom Shishko was born in Borysowo, Poland in 1910 to Asher and Yokheved nee Brodno. He was a flourmiller. Prior to WWII he lived in Borysowo, Poland. Shalom died in 1942 in Iwje, Poland at the age of 32. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1986 by his sister Rivka Aloni.   Shishko Shlomo  Borysowo  Wolozyn  Nowogrodek  Poland  1908  Page of Testimony  Shlomo Shishko was born in Borysowo, Poland in 1908 to Asher and Yokheved Brodno. He was a flourmiller. Prior to WWII he lived in Borysowo, Poland. Shlomo died in 1942 in Iwje, Poland at the age of 34. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1986 by his sister; Rivka Aloni Shmidman Ester  Bakszty  Wolozyn  Nowogrodek  Poland    Page of Testimony  Ester Shmidman nee Shishko was born in Borysowka, Poland to Asher and Yokheved. She was married to Aharon. Prior to WWII she lived in Bakszty, Poland. Ester died in 1942 in Iwje, Poland at the age of 34. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1986 by her sister Shmidman Asher  Bakszty  Wolozyn  Nowogrodek  Poland    Page of Testimony     Back        Help        Basic Search   Advanced Search  Shmidman Asher   Asher Shmidman was born in Bakszty, Poland to Aharon and Ester Shishko. He was a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Bakszty, Poland. Asher died in 1942 in Iwje, Poland at the age of 5. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1986 by his aunt. Shmidman Menashe  Bakszty  Wolozyn  Nowogrodek  Poland    Page of Testimony  Shmidman Menashe   Menashe Shmidman was born in Bakszty, Poland to Aharon and Ester Shishko. He was a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Bakszty, Poland. Menashe died in 1942 in Iwje, Poland at the age of 6. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/01/1986 by his aunt. Shishko Yokheved   Yokheved Shishko nee Brodno was born in Swenziany, Poland in 1874 to Menashe and Batia. She was a shop owner and married to Asher. Prior to WWII she lived in Borysowka, Poland. During the war was in Borysowka, Poland. Yokheved died in 1942 in the Ilje ghetto, Poland at the age of 68. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her daughter Rivka Aloni.   Katz Tzirel nee Shishko   Tzirel Katz nee Shishko was born in Wolozyn, Poland in 1899 to Asher and Yokheved. She was a housewife and married to Yosef. Prior to WWII she lived in Bakszty, Poland. During the war was in Bakszty, Poland. Tzirel died in 1942 in Iwje, Poland at the age of 43. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her sister Katz Asher  Bakszty  Wolozyn  Nowogrodek  Poland    Page of Testimony  Katz Asher   Asher Katz was born in Bakszty, Poland to Yosef and Tzirl. He was a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Bakszty, Poland. During the war was in Bakszty, Poland. Asher died in Iwje, Poland at the age of 5. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his aunt   Menashe Katz was born in Bakszty, Poland in 1928 to Yosef and Tzirl. He was a pupil and a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Bakszty, Poland. During the war was in Bakszty, Poland. Menashe died in 1942 in Iwje, Poland at the age of 14. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his aunt Shishko Khaia   Khaia Shishko was born in Borysowo, Poland in 1920 to Asher and Yokheved nee Brodno. She was a pupil and single. Prior to WWII she lived in Borysowo, Poland. During the war was in Borysowo, Poland. Khaia died in 1942 in Iwje, Poland at the age of 22. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her sister Szyszko Bynjamin   Bynjamin Szyszko was born in Borysowka, Poland in 1922 to David. He was single. Prior to WWII he lived in Borysowka, Poland. During the war was in Borysowka, Poland. Bynjamin died in 1943 in Iwje, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his acquaintance Sziszko Dawid   Dawid Sziszko was born in Trabi, Poland. He was a farmer and married to Sara nee Abramson. Prior to WWII he lived in Borysowka, Poland. During the war was in Iwje, Poland. Dawid died in 1942 in Iwje, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 19/05/1956 by his brother-in-law Submitter's Last Name      ABRAMSON Submitter's First Name      KHAIM the editor of the Vishnevo Yizkor book Relationship to victim      BROTHER-IN-LAW Date of Registration      19/05/1956 Sziszko Szima   Szima Sziszko was born in Wiszniew, Poland in 1890 to Tzvi and Ester. She was a housewife and married to David. Prior to WWII she lived in Borysowka, Poland. During the war was in Iwie, Poland. Szima died in 1942 in Iwie, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 12/10/1956 by her brother ubmitter's Last Name      ABRAMSON Submitter's First Name      KHAIM the editor of the Vishnevo Yizkor book Relationship to victim      BROTHER-IN-LAW Date of Registration      19/05/1956 Results of search for victims whose family name (including synonyms) is 'Shishko'  42 names Name   Town   District   Region   Country   Birth Date   Source   Sisko Samuel  Gomel  Gomel  Gomel  Belorussia  1885  Page of Testimony  Shishko Menashe  Borysowka  Szczuczyn  Nowogrodek  Poland  1932  Page of Testimony  Szyszko Fruma  Iwje  Lida  Nowogrodek  Poland  1909  Page of Testimony  Szyszko Syma  Borysowka      Poland  1885  Page of Testimony  Sisko Etul  Gomel  Gomel  Gomel  Belorussia  1887  Page of Testimony  Katz Tzirel  Bakszty  Wolozyn  Nowogrodek  Poland  1899  Page of Testimony  Szyszko Liba  Borisovka  Kobryn  Polesie  Poland  1887  Page of Testimony  Szyszko Aleksander  Warszawa  Warszawa  Warszawa  Poland  1907  Page of Testimony  Szyszko Riwa  Wisznewe      Poland  1877  Page of Testimony  Szyszko Helena  Warszawa  Warszawa  Warszawa  Poland  1884  Page of Testimony  Sisko Alex            list of Theresienstadt camp inmates  Szyszko Bynjamin  Borysowka  Kobryn  Polesie  Poland  1922  Page of Testimony  Szyszko Jakob  Warszawa  Warszawa  Warszawa  Poland  1882  Page of Testimony  Sziszko Dawid  Borysowka  Szczuczyn  Nowogrodek  Poland    Page of Testimony  Ryjer Chaja  Ilja  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1885  Page of Testimony 
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- Tuesday, November 23, 2004 at 23:12:04 (EST)
10 November 1850 --------------------    Revision list for Kurenets. The Alperovitz family; ALPEROVICH  Zusha son of Yudel  Head of the household   born in 1801--   ALPEROVICH  Mirka  daughter of Girsha  Wife of Zusha born in 1802  -- ALPEROVICH  Sifra Rokha daughter of Zusha  and Mirka born in 1832 --   ALPEROVICH  Movsha  son of   Zusha  and Mirka born in 1818 ---      ALPEROVICH  Dveira daughter of Khaim  born in 1818 wife of Movsha  --- ALPEROVICH  Feiga Dvosia  daughter of Movsha and Dveira born in 1837--- ALPEROVICH  Dvesia  daughter of Movsha and Dveira born in 1840 ALPEROVICH  Rokha  daughter of Movsha and Dveira born in 1845    ALPEROVICH  Iudko son of Movsha and Dveira born in 1834         ALPEROVICH  Zalman son of Zusha born in 1822       ALPEROVICH  Khana daughter of Khaim  born in 1820 wife of Zalman  ALPEROVICH  Feiga  daughter of Khana and Zalman  born in 1845     ALPEROVICH  Dvosia daughter of Khana and Zalman   born in 1848      ALPEROVICH  Dovid Movsha son of Khana and Zalman    born in 1838      ALPEROVICH  Abram Yuda son of Khana and Zalman   born in 1840       ALPEROVICH  Yuda son of Zusha  born in 1837 (father of Chaim Zalman, Grand father of Moshe who died of Typhus during the second world war and two sisters who died of Typhus during the first world war and great grandfather of Rivka (Dudik) and Zalman Alperovitz)     ---------------------------------------------------- ALPEROVICH  Zalman son of Girsh  Head of the household   died in 1837 at the age of 55 ALPEROVICH  Girsha  Zalmans'  Son  born in 1797 ALPEROVICH  Guta Beilia daughter of   Abram   born in 1800 wife of Girsha  ALPEROVICH  Khena Sima daughter of Girsha  and Guta Beilia born in 1819 widow  ALPEROVICH  Khaia  daughter of Girsha  and Guta Beilia born in 1832 widow  ALPEROVICH  Abram  son of Girsha  and Guta Beilia born in 1821 ALPEROVICH  Khaia Tsertel  daughter of Kiva  born in 1822 wife of Abram ALPEROVICH  Frada Sima  daughter of Abram and Khaia Tsertel  born in 1849 ALPEROVICH  Donia son of  Girsha and Guta Beilia born in 1823 ALPEROVICH  Tsypa Rokha  daughter of Sholom  born in 1825 wife of Donia  ALPEROVICH  Ryvka Dveira daughter of Tsypa Rokha and Donia born in 1845 ALPEROVICH  Berko  son of Zalman born in 1816 ALPEROVICH  Zyska  son of Zalman born in 1821 ALPEROVICH  Nakhman son of Zalman born in 1822 --------------------------------------------- ALPEROVICH  Borukh son of Itsko  Head of the household  born in 1780 ALPEROVICH  Etka daughter of Movsha --Wife of Borukh- born in 1783    ALPEROVICH  Leiba son of Borukh  Son  born in 1813      ALPEROVICH  Leia daughter of Khaim  born in 1813   wife of Leiba  ALPEROVICH  Zlata daughter of Leia and Leiba born in 1838      ALPEROVICH  Khana daughter of Leia and Leiba born in 1848      ------------------------------ ALPEROVICH  Dovid son of Kopel  Head of the household   born in 1804    ALPEROVICH  Zlata  Girsh  Wife    40  born in 1810      ALPEROVICH  Ryvka daughter of Dovid  Daughter  born in 1835       ALPEROVICH  Itsko son of Dovid   was missing born in 1826       ALPEROVICH  Genia  daughter of Abel  born in 1826    wife of Itsko  ALPEROVICH  Etka  daughter of Itsko   born in 1848 ---------------------------------------------- ALPEROVICH  Leiba son of Notka  Head of the household born in 1796  died in 1845    ALPEROVICH  Khaikel son of Leiba   was missing born in 1818     ALPEROVICH  Baseva daughter of Iankel  born in 18200     wife of Khaikel    ALPEROVICH  Lena daughter of Baseva and Khaikel    born in 1840     ALPEROVICH  Zalman  Leiba  Son  born in 1822       ALPEROVICH  Tsypa daughter of Zalman born in 1825 wife of Zalman  ALPEROVICH  Ginda Khaika  daughter of Zalman and  Tsypa born in 1847  ----------------------------------------------------- ALPEROVICH  Abram son of Leiba Head of the household -born in 1817 died  in 1847    Yitsko son of Gershon Mikhel  Relative   was missing born in 1824        Elka Perla daughter of Mordukh  Relative  born in 1830  wife of YItsko --------------------------------------------------- KAGAN Khaim son of Dovid  Head of the household   born in 1785 died 1848    KAGAN  Shmuila son of Khaim  Son   7 23       KAGAN  Roda  Getsel  Daughter-in-law    20     wife of Shmuila  KAGAN  Itka  Shmuila  Grand-daughter    3       ALPEROVICH  Beniamin Movsha son of Zvulun  Relative   was missing born in 1820       ALPEROVICH  Beilia  Movsha  Relative born in 1820 wife of Beniamin Movsha  KAGAN  Neukh  son of Zvulun  Nephew    born in 1838    ------------------------------------ ZAVODNIK  Itsko son of Peisakh  Head of the household    born in 1806      ZAVODNIK  Sosia daughter of Khaim  Wife     born in 18 30       ZAVODNIK  Minia Rokha daughter of Itsko    born in 1832       ZAVODNIK  Matus son of Eilia  Nephew of ZAVODNIK  Itsko was missing  born in 1826       ZAVODNIK  Khava daughter of Khaim  Niece-in-law  born in 1830    wife of Matus  ALPEROVICH  Iosel son of Eilia was missing  born in 1823     brother-in-law of Matus  ALPEROVICH  Khana daughter of Eilia    born in 1825 wife of Iosel  ALPEROVICH  Elka daughter of Khana and Iosel    born in 1845  ---------------------------------------------- ALPEROVICH  Zelik son of Notka  Head of the household   born in 1784   died 1850    ALPEROVICH  Itka daughter of Movsha  Wife born in 1790       ALPEROVICH  Eilia son of Zelik  born in 1814       ALPEROVICH  Asna daughter of  Todras  born in 1820 wife of Eilia  ALPEROVICH  Ryvka daughter of Asna and Eilia  born in 1836 ------------------------------------------ ALPEROVICH  Vulf  Abram  Head of the household  born in 1798   died 1836     ALPEROVICH  Girsha Son  of Vulf  born in 1816       ALPEROVICH  Frada daughter of Iosel  Daughter-in-law    born in 1820 wife of Girsha  ---------------------------------------------------- ALPEROVICH  Meilakh son of Movsha  Head of the household   born in 1800 ALPEROVICH  Tsyra daughter of Movsha  Wife  born in 1800      ALPEROVICH  Itsko son of Meilakh  born in 1816   unknown in 1849  ALPEROVICH  Nakhama daughter of Berko  born in 1820 wife of Itsko  ALPEROVICH  Paia daughter of Itsko born in 1835       ------------------------------------ ALPEROVICH  Girsha son of Iudka  Head of the household  born in 1817       ALPEROVICH  Khena daughter of Aron  Wife   born in 18200       ALPEROVICH  Feiga daughter of Girsha    6       ALPEROVICH  Pinkhus son of Iudka  Brother of Grisha   born in 1819      ALPEROVICH  Feiga daughter of Aron-Sister-in-law to Grisha -wife of Pinkhus  born in 1820 ALPEROVICH  Grunia daughter of Pinkhus  Girsha' Niece    born in 1840       ALPEROVICH  Sora  daughter of Pinkhus  Girsha' Niece  born in 1841       ALPEROVICH  Sosia daughter of Pinkhus  Girsha' Niece born in 1844       ALPEROVICH  Gita  daughter of Pinkhus  Girsha' Niece  born in 1848  ---------------------------------- STOLIAR  Shimon son of Iosel  Head of the household  1782   died 1840    ALPEROVICH/ STOLIAR  Mordukh son of Sakhno the relation unknown  born in 1801   unknown in 1850   ALPEROVICH  Itsko son of Leiba  unknown  born in 1827 was missing       ALPEROVICH  Sora daughter of Iosel  unknown    born in 1830     wife of Itsko  STOLIAR  Shimon son of Mordukh and Sora  Relative  born in 1841  -------------------------------- ALPEROVICH  Eilia son of Kushel  Head of the household    born in 1832      ------------------------------------------------------------   ALPEROVICH  Mordukh  son of Ansel  Head of the household   born in 1816       ALPEROVICH  Sifra daughter of Zelik  Wife   born in 1825       ALPEROVICH  Paia daughter of Mordukh  born in 1834       ALPEROVICH  Lena daughter of Mordukh   born in 1848  ------------------------------------- A LPEROVICH  Itsko son of Vulf -Head of the household   born in 1810  died 1845    RABINOVICH  Khaim Zelik son of Bedet  Relative   born in 1834  ------------------------------------------------ ALPEROVICH  Iudko  son of Vulf  Head of the household   born in 1773  unknown in 1846     ALPEROVICH  Khaikel son of Meilakh  Relative   was missing born in 1820       ALPEROVICH  Rasia  daughter of Shmuila  Relative   born in 1820     wife of Khaikel  ----------------------------------
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- Tuesday, November 23, 2004 at 16:51:05 (EST)
Tzvi Meltzer was born in Wiszniew, Poland c 1880 . He was married to Rivka nee Potashnik. Prior to WWII he lived in Wiszniew, Poland.He had 8 children. Tzvi died in 1942 in Wiszniew at the age of 62. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 07/04/2002 by his grandson Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      MELTZER First Name      TZVI First Name*      HIRSH Gender      MALE Age      62 Place of Birth      WISZNIEW,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Marital Status      MARRIED Spouse's First Name*      RIVKA Spouse's Maiden Name      POTASHNIK Place of Permanent Residence      WISZNIEW,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Place of Death      WISZNIEW,GHETTO Date of Death      1942 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      PERES Submitter's Last Name      PERSKI Submitter's First Name      GERSHON (BROTHER OF SHIMON PERES Relationship to victim      GRANDSON- lives in Tel Aviv. Date of Registration      07/04/2002 Zwi Melzer was born in Wisznewe, Poland in 1877. He was a ritual slaughterer and married to Alte. Prior to WWII he lived in Wisznewe, Poland. During the war was in Wisznewe. Zwi died in 1942 in Wisznewe. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 07/07/1957 by his community member Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      MELZER Last Name      MELTZER First Name      ZWI First Name      TZVI Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1877 Place of Birth      WISZNEWE,POLAND Marital Status      MARRIED Spouse's First Name      ALTE Place of Permanent Residence      WISZNEWE,POLAND Profession      RITUAL SLAUGHTERER Place During Wartime      WISZNEWE,GHETTO Place of Death      WISZNEWE,GHETTO Date of Death      1942 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      DUDMAN Submitter's First Name*      GEDALIA Cholon, Bialik Street 70. Relationship to victim      COMMUNITY MEMBER Date of Registration      07/07/1957 Mordekhai Dudman was born in Russia to Gedalia. He was a merchant and married to Tzira. Prior to WWII he lived in Wiszniew, Poland. During the war was in Wiszniew, Poland. Mordekhai died in 1942 in Wiszniew, Poland at the age of 70. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 17/04/1999 by his daughter-in-law. Schamai Dudmann was born in Wisznewe, Poland in 1902. He was a tailor and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Wisznewe, Poland. During the war was in Wisznewe. Schamai died in 1942 in Wisznewe. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 21/07/1957 by his community member Meer Dudman was born in Wiszniew, Poland to Beniamin. He was a barber and a widower. Prior to WWII he lived in Wiszniew, Poland. During the war was in Wiszniew, Poland. Meer died in 1942 in Wiszniew, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 19/10/1956 by his relative Joseph Dudman was born in Wiszniew, Poland in 1899 to Mejer. He was a barber and married to Miriam. Prior to WWII he lived in Wiszniew, Poland. During the war was in Wiszniew, Poland. Joseph died in 1942 in Wiszniew, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 26/07/1956 by his cousin, a Shoah survivor. Hayale Gordon was born in Wolozin, Poland to Shalom and Chesiah nee Perski. Prior to WWII she lived in Wolozin, Poland. During the war was in Wolozin, Poland. Hayale died in 1942 in Wolozin, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 24/04/1999 by her cousin from Israel, Sonia nee Perski Poter, Arlozerov Street 11 a, Ramat Gan, a Shoah survivor. Mina Persky was born in Wolozin, Poland to Payvel and Raya. Prior to WWII she lived in Wolozin, Poland. During the war was in Wolozin, Poland. Mina died in 1942 in Wolozin, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 24/04/1999 by her cousin,Sonia nee Perski Poter, Arlozerov Street 11 a, Ramat Gan, a Shoah survivor Hershale Persky was born in Wolozin, Poland to Michael. Prior to WWII he lived in Wolozin, Poland. During the war was in Wolozin, Poland. Hershale died in 1942 in Wolozin, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 24/04/1999 by his cousin, a Shoah survivor Liba Rabinovich nee Shvartz was born in Wolozyn, Poland in 1864. She was married to Yitzkhak. Prior to WWII she lived in Smorgon, Poland. Liba died in 1941 in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 02/05/1999 by her granddaughter, a Shoah survivor who lives in Bat Yam (Haredi 5)Submitter's Last Name      BENUALID RABINOVICH LENA Relationship to victim      GRANDDAUGHTER Date of Registration      02/05/1999 Is the Submitter a Survivor?      YES Language      RUSSIAN  
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- Sunday, November 21, 2004 at 03:42:44 (EST)
Rachel Even was first cousin of My great great grandmother; Gitel Kriger who was born before 1850. I found Pages of Testimony to Yad Vashem given by the grandaughter of Rachel; Batia nee FRIEDMAN KOBLENTZ of Kibutz Yagur; Asne Friedman nee Even was born in Birzai, Lithuania in 1880 to Israel and Rachel Even. She was a shop owner and married to Leib Friedman. Prior to WWII she lived in Birzai, Lithuania. During the war was in Birzai, Lithuania. Asne died in 1941 in Birzai, Lithuania at the age of 61. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her daughter Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      FRIEDMAN Last Name      FRIDMAN First Name      ASNE First Name*      ASNAT Maiden Name      EVEN Father's First Name      ISRAEL Father's First Name      YISRAEL Mother's First Name      RACHEL Mother's First Name      RAKHEL Gender      FEMALE Date of Birth      1880 Age      61 Place of Birth      BIRZAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Marital Status      MARRIED Spouse's First Name      LEIB Place of Permanent Residence      BIRZAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Profession      SHOP OWNER Place During Wartime      BIRZAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Place of Death      BIRZAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Date of Death      1941 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      KOBLENTZ Submitter's First Name      BATIA Relationship to victim      DAUGHTER Leib Friedman was born in Pumpian, Lithuania in 1878 to Yekhezkel and Chana. He was a shop owner and married to Asne. Prior to WWII he lived in Birzai, Lithuania. During the war was in Birzai, Lithuania. Leib died in 1941 in Birzai, Lithuania at the age of 61. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his daughter; Batia KOBLENTZ of kibutz Yagur Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      FRIEDMAN Last Name      FRIDMAN First Name      LEIB Father's First Name      YEKHEZKEL Mother's First Name      CHANA Mother's First Name      KHANA Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1878 Age      61 Place of Birth      PUMPIAN,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Marital Status      MARRIED Spouse's First Name      ASNE Spouse's First Name*      AVNER Place of Permanent Residence      BIRZAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Profession      SHOP OWNER Place During Wartime      BIRZAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Place of Death      BIRZAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Date of Death      1941 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      KOBLENTZ Submitter's First Name      BATIA Yehuda Fridman was born in Pumpenai, Lithuania to Yekhezkel and Khana. He was married. Prior to WWII he lived in Birzai, Lithuania. Yehuda died in 1941 in Birzai, Lithuania at the age of 60. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 14/04/1999 by Batia Koblentz Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      FRIDMAN First Name      YEHUDA First Name      LEIB Father's First Name      YEKHEZKEL Mother's First Name      KHANA Gender      MALE Age      60 Place of Birth      PUMPENAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Marital Status      MARRIED Spouse's First Name*      ASNAT Spouse's Maiden Name      EVEN Place of Permanent Residence      BIRZAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Place of Death      BIRZAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Date of Death      07/1941 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      KOBLENTZ Submitter's Last Name      FRIDMAN Submitter's First Name      BATIA Date of Registration      14/04/1999 Is the Submitter a Survivor?      NO  Rachel Westerman nee Friedman was born in Birzai, Lithuania in 1905 to Leib and Asne Even. She was a clerk and married to Boris. Prior to WWII she lived in Birzai, Lithuania. During the war was in Birzai, Lithuania. Rachel died in 1941 in Birzai, Lithuania at the age of 36. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by her sister Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      WESTERMAN Last Name      VESTERMAN First Name      RACHEL First Name      RAKHEL Maiden Name      FRIEDMAN Maiden Name      FRIDMAN Father's First Name      LEIB Mother's First Name      ASNE Mother's First Name*      ASNAT Mother's Maiden Name      EVEN Gender      FEMALE Date of Birth      1905 Age      36 Place of Birth      BIRZAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Marital Status      MARRIED Spouse's First Name      BORIS Place of Permanent Residence      BIRZAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Profession      CLERK Place During Wartime      BIRZAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Place of Death      BIRZAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Date of Death      1941 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      KOBLENTZ Submitter's First Name      BATIA Relationship to victim      SISTER   Westerman was born in Birzai, Lithuania in 1935 to Boris and Rachel Friedman. He was a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Birzai, Lithuania. During the war was in Birzai, Lithuania. Beniamin died in 1941 in Birzai, Lithuania at the age of 6. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his aunt      Pages of Testimony Last Name      WESTERMAN Last Name      VESTERMAN First Name      BENIAMIN Father's First Name      BORIS Mother's First Name      RACHEL Mother's First Name      RAKHEL Mother's Maiden Name      FRIEDMAN Mother's Maiden Name      FRIDMAN Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1935 Age      6 Place of Birth      BIRZAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Marital Status      CHILD Place of Permanent Residence      BIRZAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Place During Wartime      BIRZAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Place of Death      BIRZAI,BIRZAI,LITHUANIA Date of Death      1941 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      KOBLENTZ Submitter's First Name      BATIA sister of his mother. Boris Westerman was born in Janischki, Lithuania in 1902. He was a merchant and married to Rachel. Prior to WWII he lived in Birzai, Lithuania. During the war was in Birzai, Lithuania. Boris died in 1941 in Birzai, Lithuania at the age of 39. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his sister-in-law Batia
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- Saturday, November 20, 2004 at 23:41:02 (EST)
Hello to everyone, what a fantastic site, I keep finding tressures here! Can anyone help me? I need to know the connection between the Chafetz and all the variations of the name in Belarus and the same family names in Lithuania. All the best and lots of health Pheya Yair Searching; SACK, BLUMBERG, LEWIN, YANKOWSKY, GRUSHLAWSKY, BABUSKIN, KALGUT, BLUMENFELD, TAUBE, ZEITLIN, GOSSHEL, GABRILOWITSH, ABRAHAMS, WILAN, BROWN, TOWBIN all Latvia, Belarus, Ukraina, Lithuania, S. A, USA.Canada, South America, Scandinavia, France.   pheya@actcom.co.il 
Pheya Yair
Israel - Saturday, November 20, 2004 at 22:12:33 (EST)
Hinda Schulman nee Alperovitz was born in Wilejka, Poland in 1860 to Moshe and Dvora Alperovitz. She was married to Meir Shalom Shulman. During the war was in Kurenets, Poland. Hinda died in Kurenets, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 03/06/1956 by her grandchild, a Shoah survivor. Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      SCHULMAN Last Name      SHULMAN First Name      HINDA Maiden Name      ALPEROVITZ Father's First Name      MOSHE Mother's First Name      DVORA Gender      FEMALE Date of Birth      1860 Place of Birth      WILEJKA,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Marital Status      MARRIED Spouse's First Name      MEIR SHALOM Spouse's First Name      SHALOM Place During Wartime      KURENETS,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Place of Death      KURENETS,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      TANTZMAN Submitter's First Name      PESIA Relationship to victim      GRANDCHILD (living in Beer Sheva, Israel in 1956) Date of Registration      03/06/1956 Is the Submitter a Survivor?      YES (was in Russia)  
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- Saturday, November 20, 2004 at 12:28:25 (EST)
Menakhem Shereshevski was born in Lithuania to Shmuel and Cheina nee Levitan. He was single. Prior to WWII he lived in Slobodka, Lithuania. During the war was in Kowna. Menakhem died in the Shoah at the age of 13. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 29/04/1980 by his mother Tzvi Shereshevski was born in Kovno, Lithuania to Shmuel. He was single. Prior to WWII he lived in Kovno, Lithuania. During the war was in Kovno. Tzvi died in Auschwitz? at the age of 10. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 29/04/1980 by his mother Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name*      SHERESHEVSKI First Name      TZVI Father's First Name      SHMUEL Father's First Name      ZAIDEL Mother's Name*      KHIENA nee Levitan ( sister to Nachum and Ben- Zion Levitan and Batia Shapira) Gender      MALE Age      10 Place of Birth      KOVNO,KAUNAS,LITHUANIA Marital Status      SINGLE Place of Permanent Residence      KOVNO,KAUNAS,LITHUANIA Place During Wartime      KOVNO,GHETTO Place of Death      AUSCHWITZ,CAMP Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name*      SHERESHEVSKI Submitter's First Name*      KHIENA Relationship to victim      MOTHER Date of Registration      29/04/1980  
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- Friday, November 19, 2004 at 23:47:01 (EST)
Pages of Testimony to Yad Vashem by Nachum Levitan (Grandfather of My husband; Daniel Levitan Jonina Levitan was born in Kaunas, Lithuania in 1942 to Nakhum and Ada Yeta nee Rabinovitz. During the war was in Kaunas. Jonina died in July of 1944 in Kaunas, Lithuania. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/11/1956 by her father, a Shoah survivor Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      LEVITAN Last Name      LEVIATAN First Name      JONINA First Name*      YANINA Father's First Name      NAKHUM Mother's First Name      ADA Mother's First Name*      YETA Gender      FEMALE Date of Birth      1942 Place of Birth      KAUNAS,KAUNAS,LITHUANIA Place of Permanent Residence      KAUNAS,KAUNAS,LITHUANIA Place During Wartime      KAUNAS,GHETTO Place of Death      KAUNAS,KAUNAS,LITHUANIA Date of Death      July of 1944 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      LEVIATAN Submitter's First Name      NAKHUM Relationship to victim      FATHER Date of Registration      20/11/1956 Is the Submitter a Survivor?      YES   Pages of Testimony by the same submitter ( Levitan Nachum, grandson of Nakhum and Rivka Gerstein) Icchak Gerstein was born in Kowno, Lithuania in 1882 to Nakhum and Rivka. He was a merchant and married to Khana nee Gutman. Prior to WWII he lived in Kowno, Lithuania. During the war was in Vilkomir, Lithuania. Icchak died in 1941 in Vilkomir, Lithuania. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/11/1956 by his nephew . Nachum Gerstein was born in Kaunas, Lithuania in 1909 to Icchak/Yitzkhak and Khana. He was a merchant and married to Ester nee Mishkovski. Prior to WWII he lived in Kaunas, Lithuania. During the war was in Kaunas, Lithuania. Nachum died in 1941 in Kaunas, Lithuania. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/11/1956 by his cousin, a Shoah survivor Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      GERSTEIN Last Name      GERSHTEIN First Name      NACHUM First Name      NAKHUM      MEIR Father's First Name      YITZKHAK Mother's First Name      KHANA    ESTER Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1909 Place of Birth      KAUNAS,KAUNAS,LITHUANIA Marital Status      MARRIED Spouse's First Name      ESTER Spouse's Maiden Name      MISHKOVSKI Age of 1st Child      4 Age of 2nd Child      2 Place of Permanent Residence      KAUNAS,KAUNAS,LITHUANIA Profession      MERCHANT Place During Wartime      KAUNAS,KAUNAS,LITHUANIA Place of Death      KAUNAS,KAUNAS,LITHUANIA Date of Death      09/1941 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      LEVIATAN Submitter's First Name      NAKHUM Relationship to victim      COUSIN Date of Registration      20/11/1956 Is the Submitter a Survivor?      YES all pages; Name   Town   District   Region   Country   Birth Date   Source   Rakhel Mankevic was born in Kaunas, Lithuania in 1877 to Tzvi and Rivka. She was a housewife and a widow. Prior to WWII she lived in Kaunas, Lithuania. During the war was in Kaunas, Lithuania. Rakhel died in 1941 in Kaunas. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/11/1956 by her nephew Pages of Testimony by the same submitter ( Levitan Nachum, grandson of Tzvi Eliezer and Rivka Levitan) Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      MANKEVIC First Name      RAKHEL Father's First Name      TZVI ELIEZER Mother's First Name      RIVKA Gender      FEMALE Date of Birth      1877 Place of Birth      KAUNAS,KAUNAS,LITHUANIA Marital Status      WIDOW Place of Permanent Residence      KAUNAS,KAUNAS,LITHUANIA Profession      HOUSEWIFE Place During Wartime      KAUNAS,KAUNAS,LITHUANIA Place of Death      KAUNAS,GHETTO Date of Death      08/1941 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      LEVIATAN Submitter's First Name      NAKHUM Relationship to victim      NEPHEW Date of Registration      20/11/1956   Dr. Rachmiel Ligum was born in Zagare, Lithuania in 1906 to Yitzkhak. He was a physician and married to Sara. Prior to WWII he lived in Vilkomir, Lithuania. During the war was in Vilkomir, Lithuania. Rachmiel died in 1941 in Vilkomir, Lithuania. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/11/1956 by his cousin Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      LIGUM First Name      RACHMIEL First Name      YERAKHMIEL Title      DR. Father's First Name      YITZKHAK Mother's First Name*      FREIDA Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1906 Place of Birth      ZAGARE,SIAULIAI,LITHUANIA Marital Status      MARRIED Spouse's First Name      SARA      HINDA born in 1916 Spouse's Maiden Name*      GERSHTEIN She is the cousin of Nachum Name of 1st Child      DOV Age of 1st Child      1 Name of 2nd Child      YISRAEL Age of 2nd Child      3 Place of Permanent Residence      VILKOMIR,UKMERGE,LITHUANIA Profession      PHYSICIAN Place During Wartime      VILKOMIR,UKMERGE,LITHUANIA Place of Death      VILKOMIR,UKMERGE,LITHUANIA Date of Death      08/1941 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      LEVIATAN Submitter's First Name      NAKHUM Relationship to victim      COUSIN Date of Registration      20/11/1956   Dr. Lieb Arie Gerstein was born in Vilna, Poland in 1891 to Gershon and Miriam/ Mera. He was a physician and married to Miriam nee Blumental. Prior to WWII he lived in Kovna. During the war was in Kovna Lieb died in 1944 in Kremnic,camp . This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/11/1956 by his cousin.  More Details...    Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      GERSTEIN Last Name      GERSHTEIN First Name      LEON First Name      LEIB First Name      ARIE Title      DR. Father's First Name      GERSHON Mother's First Name      MIRIAM Mother's First Name      MERA Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1891 Place of Birth      VILNA,WILNO,WILNO,POLAND Marital Status      MARRIED Spouse's First Name      MIRIAM Spouse's Maiden Name      BLUMENTAL Name of 1st Child*      PEREL Age of 1st Child      15 Date of Death      1944 Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      LEVIATAN Submitter's First Name      NAKHUM Relationship to victim      COUSIN Date of Registration      20/11/1956  
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- Friday, November 19, 2004 at 21:04:15 (EST)
To Whom It May Concern, My maiden name was Brauer. My Zayda on my father's side was born in Vilna Gubernia, possibly Lida, on March 2nd, 1892. His date of birth coincided with Purim. Zayda was the youngest of 3 children of Wolf/Zev Brauer. He had a sister named Brina. I don't know his brother's name or his mother's name. Zayda's given name at birth was Gedaliahu. Upon immigrating to America, he changed it to Joe/Joseph. Zayda entered the U.S.A. via the port of Galveston, Texas. He settled in Chicago, where he married and raised a family. Prior to emigrating to the U.S.A., Zayda was a yeshiva bochur at Slobodka. Once he settled in Chicago, he became a kosher butcher. If any of this sounds vaguely familiar, please let me know. Thanks in advance for your assistance. Sincerely, Susan Goldman
Susan Goldman <HowSusan87@aol.com>
USA - Friday, November 19, 2004 at 14:35:25 (EST)
Michael Alperovitch was born in Kurzeniec, Poland to Yehoash and Sheina Alperovitz/ Shapira. He was a merchant and married to Sima. Prior to WWII he lived in Wolozin, Poland. During the war was in Wolozin, Poland. Michael died in 1942 in Wolozin, Poland at the age of 42. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 20/04/1999 by his cousin, Yeoash Alperovitz of Kurenetz, a Shoah survivor ------------------------------ Hirsh Stoler was born in Kurenitz, Poland to Shimon. He was a tailor and married. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurenitz,Spouse's First Name*      FRIDA During the war was in Kurenitz, Poland. Hirsh died in 1942 in Kurenitz, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/04/1999 by his relative Sheina Nee Kopilevitz Stoler of Kfar Charif Fridel Stoler. She was a housewife. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurenitz Poland. During the war was in Kurnitz, Poland with 3 children. Fridel died in 1942 in Kurenitz, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/04/1999 by her relative Sheina Nee Kopilevitz Stoler of Kfar Charif Khaia Stoler was born in Kurzeniec, Poland to Hirsha Mendel and Fridel. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Khaia died in 1942 in Kurzeniec, Poland at the age of 15. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/04/1999 by her relative Sheina Nee Kopilevitz Stoler of Kfar Charif. Ytza Sachna Stoler was born in Kurzeniec, Poland to Shimon. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. wife' name;Ester They died in 1942 in Kurzeniec, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/04/1999 by his daughter-in-law; Sheina Nee Kopilevitz Stoler of Kfar Charif. Hilel Stoler was born in Kurnica, Poland to Ytza- Sachna Stoler and Ester malka. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurnica, Poland. During the war was in Kurnica, Poland. Hilel died in 1942 in Kurnica, Poland at the age of between 8- 10. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/04/1999 by his sister-in-law Sheina Nee Kopilevitz Stoler of Kfar Charif. Tana Tzimerman son of Eizik was born in Kurzeniec, Poland. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Tana died in 1942 in Kurzeniec, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/04/1999 by his granddaughter Sheina Nee Kopilevitz Stoler of Kfar Charif. Sara Tzimerman was born in Kornitz, Poland to Tana Zimerman and Fruma. Prior to WWII she lived in Kornitz, Poland. During the war was in Kornitz, Poland. Sara died in 1942 in Kornitz, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/04/1999 by her niece (daughter of her sister) Sheina Nee Kopilevitz Stoler of Kfar Charif. Hindaa Tzimerman was born in Kurzeniec, Poland to Tana Zimerman and Fruma.. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Hinda died in 1942 in Kurzeniec, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 28/04/1999 by her niece (daughter of her sister) Sheina Nee Kopilevitz Stoler of Kfar Charif. Frida Tzimerman nee Alperovitz was born in Kurzeniec, Poland in 1903 to Itza Michael Alperovitz and Nekhama nee Zimerman. She was a farmer and married to Hela. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. Frida died in 1944 in the Shoah at the age of 41. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 16/04/1999 by her son,Shimon Zimerman of Kfar Charif, a Shoah survivor Hela Tzimerman was born in Kurenitza, Poland in 1898 to Neta and Khaia Sore. He was a farmer. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurenitz, Poland. Hela died in 1944 in Belorussia at the age of 46. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 26/04/1999 by hisr son Shimon Zimerman of Kfar Charif, a Shoah survivor. Shabtai Gordon was born in 1902 to Aharon. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurenitz, Poland. During the war was in Kornitz, Poland. Shabtai died in 1942 in Kurenitz, Poland at the age of 40. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted by his son-in-law, ( Riva) husband; Shimon Zimerman of Kfar Charif,, a Shoah survivor Sonia Gordon was born in 1910 to Khaim. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Sonia died in 1942 in Kurzeniec, Poland at the age of 32. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 22/04/1999 by her (step) son-in-law,( Riva' ) husband; Shimon Zimerman of Kfar Charif, a Shoah survivor. Golda Gordon was born in Korenetz, Poland in 1932 to Sonia and Shabtai Gordon. During the war was in Korenetz, Poland. Golda died in 1942 in Korenetz, Poland at the age of 10. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 22/04/1999 by her sister' ( Riva) husband; Shimon Zimerman of Kfar Charif, , a Shoah survivor Shlomo Gordon was born in Kurzeniec, Poland in 1927 to Sonia and Shabtai Gordon. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. Shlomo died in 1942 in Kurzeniec, Poland at the age of 15. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 22/04/1999 by his sister' ( Riva) husband; Shimon Zimerman of Kfar Charif,, a Shoah survivor Khaim Gordon was born in Korenetz, Poland in 1929 to Sonia and Shabtai. Khaim died in 1942 in Korenetz, Poland at the age of 13. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 22/04/1999 by his brother-in-law, his sister' ( Riva) husband; Shimon Zimerman of Kfar Charif,, a Shoah survivor. Sonia Gordon was born in 1910 to Khaim. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Sonia died in 1942 in Kurzeniec, Poland at the age of 32. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 22/04/1999 by her mother-in-law, a Shoah survivor Khana Ashinobski nee Dinershtein was born in Kurenitz, Poland in 1884 to Gotlib and Yenta Dinershtein. She was a farmer and married to Yerakhmiel nee Ashinobski. Prior to WWII she lived in Smorgon, Poland. During the war was in Smorgon, Poland. Khana died in 1943 in Ponar, Poland at the age of 59. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 25/04/1999 by her daughter Mashinski Zila of Rehovot, a Shoah survivor Khana and Rachel -marisha Zeif were born in Korenetz, Poland to Shlomo and Gitel nee Roytshtein. they were children. Prior to WWII they lived in Korenetz, Poland. Khana and Rachel -marisha Zeifdied in 1942 in Wilejka, Poland at the age of 8 and 10. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 03/05/1995 by ar relative; Fruma Gurevitz of Kiryat Mozkin Sheina Tzimerman was born in Kurzeniec, Poland to Neta and Elka Zimerman. She was married to Nakhum. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. Sheina died in 1942 in Kurzeniec, Poland at the age of 26 with her little baby. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/05/1999 by her niece Chaia Nee Kopilovitz Alperovitz of Rishon Lezion, a Shoah survivor ----------------------------------- Sara was born in Kurzeniec, Poland to Nakhum. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. Sara died in 1942 in Kurzeniec, Poland at the age of 1. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 01/05/1999 by Khaia Nee Kopilovitz Alperovitz of Rishon Lezion, a Shoah survivor Ester Kohen was born in Vilna, Poland. She was married to Rafael. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. Ester died in 1941 in Kurzeniec, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 23/04/1999 by her grandson Yuval Even Shoshan (son of Zvia and Avraham) in Jerusalem Shoshana Kohen was born in Kurenets, Poland to Rafael and Ester. She was a teacher. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurenets, Poland. Shoshana died in 1941 in Kurenets, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 23/04/1999 by her sisters' son; Yuval Even Shoshan in Jerusalem Yosef Kohen was born in Kurzeniec, Poland to Rafael and Ester. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. Yosef died in 1941 in Kurzeniec, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 23/04/1999 by his sisters' son; Yuval Even Shoshan in Jerusalem Yosef Kohen was born in Kurzeniec, Poland to Rafael and Ester. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. Yosef died in 1941 in Kurzeniec, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 23/04/1999 by his sisters' son; Yuval Even Shoshan in Jerusalem Gizela Danishevski nee Kagan was born in Kurenitz, Poland. She was a housewife and married to Shmuel. Prior to WWII she lived in Smargon, Poland. During the war was in Smargon, Poland. Gizela died in 1940 in Smargon, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 05/05/1999 by her daughter; Rivka nee Danishevski Grichter of Jerusalem Welwu Zamoszecki was born in Kurzeniec, Poland in 1917 (his fathers name; Lipa). He was single. Prior to WWII he lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. During the war was in Kurzeniec, Poland. Welwu died in 1941 in Kurzeniec, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 05/05/1957 by his acquaintance, Yisrael Alperovitz of Ashkelon, a Shoah survivor Zlata Ryjer was born in Kurzeniec, Poland in 1898. She was married. Prior to WWII she lived in Ilja, Poland. During the war was in Ilja, Poland. Zlata died in 1942 in Ilja, Poland. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 04/05/1956 by her acquaintance, a Shoah survivor Name of 1st Child      YEKHEZKEL Age of 1st Child      16 Name of 2nd Child*      DISHKA Age of 2nd Child      14 Name of 3rd Child*      SARA Age of 3rd Child      12 Spouse's First Name*      YISRAEL Submitter's Last Name*      REIER Submitter's First Name      YONA of Tel Baruch Ester Beker was born in Kurzeniec, Poland to Nakhum and Perla nee Gurevitz. Prior to WWII she lived in Kurzeniec, Poland. Ester died in 1942 in Wilejka, Poland at the age of 20. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 04/04/1999 by her cousin, a Shoah survivorSubmitter's Last Name      LIBERMAN Submitter's First Name      MIKHAEL Relationship to victim      COUSIN , lives in Rosh Haain Source      Pages of Testimony Last Name      SHULMAN First Name      BENJAMIN /  BENIAMIN Gender      MALE Date of Birth      1924 to Rachel and Aharon Shulman Place of Birth      POLAND Place of Permanent Residence      KURZENIEC,WILEJKA,WILNO,POLAND Place of Death      PARTIZAN was killed while fighting the Germans in the winter of 1943. Type of Material      Page of Testimony Submitter's Last Name      KOHEN Submitter's First Name      LEA Date of Registration      27/06/1957 Chedera, Brandas 87 Place of Residence Name   Town   District   Region   Country   Birth Date   Source   Alperovitch Michael  Wolozin  Wolozyn  Nowogrodek  Poland    Page of Testimony  Stoleru* Frida*  Kurnica  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Tzimerman Frida*  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1903  Page of Testimony  Stoleru* Lea*  Korenetz  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Gordon Golda          1932  Page of Testimony  Tzimerman Hela  Kurnica  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1898  Page of Testimony  Ashinobski Khana  Smorgon  Oszmiana  Wilno  Poland  1884  Page of Testimony  Beker Ester  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Kohen Shoshana  Kurenets  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Zeif Khana  Korenetz  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Tzimerman Sheina*  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Kohen Yosef  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Danishevski* Gizela*  Smargon  Oszmiana  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Kohen Avraham  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Kohen Ester  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Zamoszecki Welwu  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1917  Page of Testimony  Ryjer Zlata  Ilja  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1898  Page of Testimony  Stoleru* Khaia  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Gordon Aharon*  Kurnica  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1925  Page of Testimony  Gordon Shlomo*  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1927  Page of Testimony  Gordon Shabtai*  Kornitz  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1902  Page of Testimony  Stoleru* Hirsh*  Kurnica  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Tzimerman Sara  Kornitz  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Tzimerman Hadasa*  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Gordon Sonia          1910  Page of Testimony  Sara  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Stoleru* Hilel*  Kurnica  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Stoleru* Ester*  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Tzimerman Tana  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Gordon Khaim*          1929  Page of Testimony  Name   Town   District   Region   Country   Birth Date   Source   Becker Jakob  Wilno  Wilno  Wilno  Poland  1904  Page of Testimony  Gorwicz Baszka  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1900  Page of Testimony  Solominski Ester  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1904  Page of Testimony  Pitem Khana  Daugavpils  Daugavpils  Latgale  Latvia  1875  Page of Testimony  Stoler Ester  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1900  Page of Testimony  Kremer Dwore  Kurnica  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1880  Page of Testimony  Cimerman Rywa  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland    Page of Testimony  Blinder  Kurenets  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1872  Page of Testimony  Babiner Rachel  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1892  Page of Testimony  Shulman Sonja  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1922  Page of Testimony  Szuman Benjamin  Kurzeniec  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1924  Page of Testimony  Ziskand Ita  Kornitz  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1914  Page of Testimony  Ruderman Wolf  Kurnica  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1918  Page of Testimony  Shkolnik Chaja  Korenetz  Wilejka  Wilno  Poland  1902  Page of Testimony  Ruderman Chaja  Dokszyce  Glebokie  Wilno  Poland  1919  Page of Testimony 
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- Friday, November 19, 2004 at 01:27:49 (EST)
Radoszkowicz Yakob   Yakob Radoszkowicz was born in Dolhinow, Poland in 1875 to Yisrael and Batia. He was a merchant and married to Pnina nee Cazowitz. Prior to WWII he lived in Dolhinow, Poland. During the war was in Dolhinow, Poland. Yakob died in the Shoah. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted on 25/02/1957 by his son The data base of Pages of Testimony is up and is searchable online. go to www.yadvashem.org click on "The Central Database of Shoah Victims' Names " between the pictures you will get to; http://www.yadvashem.org/wps/portal/IY_HON_Entrance click on enter and you will get to; http://names.yadvashem.org/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_9E here you have a search engine; I put only Location: Ilja and I got a long list; Name Town District Region Country Birth Date Source Brunsztejn Eljasz Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1918 Page of Testimony Brunsztejn Beniamin Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Brujdo Chaja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1910 Page of Testim Brujdo Bencjan Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1880 Page of Testimony Chajkin Zalman Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1909 Page of Testimony Kopelowicz Faja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1906 Page of Testimony Klotz Khaia* Ilia Rudnia* Leib* Warsaw Warszawa Warszawa Poland Page of Testimony Klotz Moshe Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Kaufman Chana Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1901 Page of Testimony Kopelowicz Hilel Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1878 Page of Testimony Kugel Nisza Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Kugel Natan Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Kacowicz Zalman Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Kopelowicz Gita Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1917 Page of Testimony Jaroszewski Hodel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Kacowicz Jtka 1912 Page of Testimony Kacowicz Chajm Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1906 Page of Testimony Kacowicz Sara Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1906 Page of Testimony Leberfarb Szejna Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1892 Page of Testimony Leberfarb Szmuel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1891 Page of Testimony Lewin Baruch Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1875 Page of Testimony Lapidus Rachel Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1905 Page of Testimony Lapidus Sara Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1909 Page of Testimony Lewin Diszka Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1919 Page of Testimony Lipka Chaja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1920 Page of Testimony Mordehowicz Loba Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1907 Page of Testimony Wajnes Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Lea Ilya Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony ony Leberferb Elimelach Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1910 Page of Testimony Leberfarb Jehoszua Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1914 Page of Testimony Lewin Szaja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1908 Page of Testimony Lewin Rubin Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1904 Page of Testimony Lewin Brajna Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1880 Page of Testimony Lewin Hendel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1917 Page of Testimony Lewin Szejna Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Lapidus Mosze Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Leberfarb Lea Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1922 Page of Testimony Lewin Riwka Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1914 Page of Testimony Lipak Hende 1900 Page of Testimony Leberfarb Nachama Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1915 Page of Testimony Lewin Rejza Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Lewin Szloma Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Finkel Szejna Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1912 Page of Testimony Gordon Szifra Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1883 Page of Testimony Czarna Israel Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1875 Page of Testimony Kacowicz Diszka Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1921 Page of Testimony Jaroszewski Chaja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1885 Page of Testimony Cimerman Gita Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1910 Page of Testimony Kugel Perla Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1911 Page of Testimony Rabunska Leja Page of Testimony Koplowicz Hylel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1880 Page of Testimony Ryier Icchak Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1919 Page of Testimony Ryier Cipora Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1914 Page of Testimony Ryjer Roza Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1920 Page of Testimony Ryier Chjena Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1908 Page of Testimony Ryjer Tema Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1923 Page of Testimony Ryjer Lejb Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Ryier Batia Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1916 Page of Testimony Ryjer Noach Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1880 Page of Testimony Ryier Dawid Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1920 Page of Testimony Ryjer Rachel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Ryjer Jakow Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1911 Page of Testimony Ryjer Basja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Ryjer Zlata Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1898 Page of Testimony Ryjer Chaja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1885 Page of Testimony Source Ryjer Ester Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1922 Page of Testimony Rier Chaim Ila Wilejka Wilno Poland 1912 Page of Testimony Ryier Sara Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1913 Page of Testimony Shinder Pesakh Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Rudnia* Hirsh Warsaw Warszawa Warszawa Poland Page of Testimony Ashinobski Liber* Ilia Page of Testimony Shinder Motala Ilia Page of Testimony Shinder Khaia Ilya Wilejka Wilno Poland 1916 Page of Testimony Rozin Avram Ilya Wilejka Wilno Poland 1924 Page of Testimony Geler Nekhama Wilno Wilno Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Margolis Fejga Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1906 Page of Testimony Lewin Chajm Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1898 Page of Testimony Ruderman Rachmil Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Ruderman Tamara Ilya Wilejka Wilno Poland 1895 Page of Testimony Sapoznik Hirsz Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Klotz Shmuel Ilya Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Daniszewski Nachman Page of Testimony Genut Sighet Maramures Crisana-maramures Romania 1912 Page of Testimony Shapiro Leningrad Leningrad Leningrad Russia 1905 Page of Testimony Epsztejn Ester Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1914 Page of Testimony Shapira Barukh Ilya Wilejka Wilno Poland 1897 Page of Testimony Cheifetz Heshie Vilna Wilno Wilno Poland 1905 Page of Testimony Lawit Elja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1915 Page of Testimony Gordon Nachama Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1914 Page of Testimony Fidler Rachel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1908 Page of Testimony Dokszicki Pesie Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Fidler Lyba Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1888 Page of Testimony Kopelowicz Chaja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Sinder Chajm Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1911 Page of Testimony Sinder Meir Ilya Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Sinder Sara Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1870 Page of Testimony Nejfach Fiszka Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Sosenski Yoel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1908 Page of Testimony Sosenski Yicchak Radoszkowice Molodeczno Wilno Poland 1898 Page of Testimony Sosenska Chana Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1910 Page of Testimony Sosenski Eliezer Viazin Molodeczno Wilno Poland 1911 Page of Testimony Sosenski Chaya Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1899 Page of Testimony Sosenski Hirsch Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1936 Page of Testimony Sosenski Rosa Sapoznik Chasza Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1898 Page of Testimony Sinder Elja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1908 Page of Testimony Sinder Pejsach Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1910 Page of Testimony Sinder Icchak 1925 Page of Testimony Sinder Liba Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Sinder Necha Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1908 Page of Testimony Sinder Chana Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1918 Page of Testimony Sinder Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1906 Page of Testimony Sinder Minka Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1870 Page of Testimony Sinder Pnina Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1912 Page of Testimony Sinder Rochel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1901 Page of Testimony 1931 Page of Testimony Sinder Ciwia Ilia 1910 Page of Testimony Ekman Rubin Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1895 Page of Testimony Wajnes Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1902 Page of Testimony Wajnes Mojsze Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1867 Page of Testimony Cirulnik Rivka Kurenets Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Berman Perla Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1904 Page of Testimony Kugel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1906 Page of Testimony Zelten Sara Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1895 Page of Testimony Mordchowicz Mera Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1880 Page of Testimony Riev Altar Ilya Wilejka Wilno Poland 1908 Page of Testimony Chimerman Jehuda Smargon Oszmiana Wilno Poland 1898 Page of Testimony Kopelowicz Perla Page of Testimony Kopelowicz Rachel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1915 Page of Testimony Kopelowicz Malka Poland 1915 Page of Testimony Koplowicz Seajne Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1885 Page of Testimony Kopelowicz Mowsza Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1908 Page of Testimony Kopelowicz Elka Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1915 Page of Testimony Kopelowicz Bejla Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1870 Page of Testimony Gordon Szendel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1908 Page of Testimony Nejfach Roche Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Rubin Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1895 Page of Testimony Szwarcberg Szmuel Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1880 Page of Testimony Nejfach Szoszana Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1870 Page of Testimony Lewin Sara Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1905 Page of Testimony Lipper Jaroslaw Jaroslaw Lwow Poland 1891 Page of Testimony Szulman Eljakum Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1872 Page of Testimony Szulman Ester Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1884 Page of Testimony Bass Ester Wilna Wilno Wilno Poland 1898 Page of Testimony Kozlova Frida Ilia 1890 Page of Testimony Gordon Sara Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1915 Page of Testimony Kagan Sifra Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1908 Page of Testimony Sosman Bluma Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1916 Page of Testimony Cimerman Eljahu Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Kaufman Szlomo Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1894 Page of Testimony Zarecia Hirsz Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1888 Page of Testimony Zut Mowsza Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1902 Page of Testimony Sapoznik Elja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1888 Page of Testimony Zabodnik Bela Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Sosman Chaja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Sosman Loba Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1918 Page of Testimony Zalmanobski Dwora Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Kugel Niszka Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Sosman Sara Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1920 Page of Testimony Riwkin Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Gringaus Chuma Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1904 Page of Testimony Menches Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Morduchowicz Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1908 Page of Testimony Rubin Majrim Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1926 Page of Testimony Szmotkin Abraham Warsaw Warszawa Warszawa Poland 1913 Page of Testimony Czarna Chaja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1877 Page of Testimony Kugel Chaja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1922 Page of Testimony Rudnicki Baruch Page of Testimony Grinblat Eliezer Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1917 Page of Testimony Zeltin Zeeb Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1922 Page of Testimony Berman Aron Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1910 Page of Testimony Grinblat Simcha Page of Testimony Gurewicz Yehuda 1883 Page of Testimony Grozbien Fejga Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1904 Page of Testimony Chajkin Ciwia Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1914 Page of Testimony Chajkin Chaja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1906 Page of Testimony Chajkin Ziamka Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1910 Page of Testimony Chdosz Rachel Ilia 1892 Page of Testimony Chajkin Alte Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Chajkin Mordchaj Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1910 Page of Testimony Sosman Khaia Ilya Wilejka Wilno Poland 1896 Page of Testimony Zalmanobski Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1880 Page of Testimony Rozin Chaia Ilia 1908 Page of Testimony Chajkin Gita Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1917 Page of Testimony Chajkin Zalman Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1920 Page of Testimony Shakhman Shlomo Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1915 Page of Testimony Sinder Rywka Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1919 Page of Testimony Ekman Rachel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Sosman Chaja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Sosman Bluma Ilia 1917 Page of Testimony Baruchin Wolf Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1990 Page of Testimony Boruchin Wolf Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Chajkin Riwka Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Kopelewicz Altka Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1919 Page of Testimony Name Town District Region Country Birth Date Source Rogozinski Morduch Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1915 Page of Testimony Rogozinski Szloma Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1917 Page of Testimony Rozen Ben cion Ilya Wilejka Wilno Poland 1895 Page of Testimony Rozin Abraham Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1909 Page of Testimony Shapiro Boris Leningrad Leningrad Leningrad Russia 1911 Page of Testimony Szmotkin Varsha Warszawa Warszawa Poland 1892 Page of Testimony Rabunski Yankel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1919 Page of Testimony Sosenski Tzila Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1933 Page of Testimony Solomianski Eljasz Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1885 Page of Testimony Jaroszewski Roda Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1873 Page of Testimony Kopelowicz Jakob Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1885 Page of Testimony Szulman Bluma Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1875 Page of Testimony Sosman Lyuba Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1918 Page of Testimony Bernshtein Basya Ilya Wilejka Wilno Poland 1906 Page of Testimony Vaines Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1903 Page of Testimony Berman Lyuba Molodeczno Molodeczno Wilno Poland 1920 Page of Testimony Klopot Andreas 1898 card file of Mauthausen camp Brojdo Dwora Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1917 Page of Testimony Brunsztejn Sara 1885 Page of Testimony Lapidus Ester Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1915 Page of Testimony Rozin Dwora Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Kapilewicz Mosze Warszawa Warszawa Warszawa Poland 1877 Page of Testimony Kacowicz Lea Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Kopelewicz Wolf Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Kocowicz Basia Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1916 Page of Testimony Rabunski Jakow Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1917 Page of Testimony Rabunski Leja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1885 Page of Testimony Name Town District Region Country Birth Date Source Jesel Eliahu 1888 Page of Testimony Lewin Lejzer Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1901 Page of Testimony Margolis Szerka Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Ryier Iser Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1896 Page of Testimony Gelman Rachmil Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Milrad Yekhiel Lodz Lodz Lodz Poland 1894 Page of Testimony Lazar Bubi Oradea Bihor Crisana-maramures Romania 1903 Page of Testimony Veines* Moshe Page of Testimony Solomianski Chasia Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1910 Page of Testimony Bokser Chaja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1885 Page of Testimony Kolodny Chaja Dawid Grodek Luniniec Polesie Poland 1898 Page of Testimony Vaines Moshe Molodechno Molodeczno Wilno Poland 1863 Page of Testimony Fidler Hirsz Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1902 Page of Testimony Kremer Liba Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Gelman Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Rubin Hirsh Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Rubin Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Rubin Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Berman Loba 1916 Page of Testimony Grinblat Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1880 Page of Testimony Sender Ajzik Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1894 Page of Testimony Sosman Sara 1919 Page of Testimony Sosman Wolf 1890 Page of Testimony Solomianski Israel Ilya Wilejka Wilno Poland 1904 Page of Testimony Sender Fejga Ilia 1902 Page of Testimony Sinder Szejna Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Sinder Motka Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1892 Page of Testimony Brojdo Bencjon Page of Testimony Szapiro Jochewed Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1924 Page of Testimony Nejfach Chajm Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Source Pruzan Chava Kaunas Kaunas Lithuania 1890 Page of Testimony Mendelson Faige Warszawa Warszawa Warszawa Poland Page of Testimony Rubin Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Klok Beniamin Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Klok Sara Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Klok Yoel Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Klok Aharon* Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Shulman Sima Krybieczy Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Unknown Rivka* Radoszkowice Molodeczno Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Shulman Bluma Krivichi Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Shulman Reuven Krivichi Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Dobrovski* Khaia Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Solomianski Chaja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Segalowicz Chana Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1906 Page of Testimony Berman Sara Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1880 Page of Testimony Chajkin Diszka Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1870 Page of Testimony Chajkin Riwka 1893 Page of Testimony Chaikin Liba Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1915 Page of Testimony Chajkin Mendel Ilia 1906 Page of Testimony Lewin Ester Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1860 Page of Testimony Lewin Mendel Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1880 Page of Testimony Chajkin David Ilia 1870 Page of Testimony Chajkin Chajm Ilya Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Brojdo Fejga Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Brojdo Chaia Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1919 Page of Testimony Brojdo Chaim Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1921 Page of Testimony Jesel Chaia Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Zut Fejga Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1902 Page of Testimony Sztejnman Chana Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Sosenski Shmuel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1898 Page of Testimony Rypsztajn Fajwel Page of Testimony Barman Yosef Ilya Wilejka Wilno Poland 1912 Page of Testimony Bildhauer Alice Cluj Cluj Transylvania Romania 1921 Page of Testimony Baruchin Rachel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1893 Page of Testimony Gofin Elka Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1906 Page of Testimony Epsztejn Rachel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1880 Page of Testimony Zawodnik Mojsze Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1912 Page of Testimony Epstein Chona Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1910 Page of Testimony Shakhman Lea Page of Testimony Gofin Nachman Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1910 Page of Testimony Gelman Pesach Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Izbicki Jochwet list of deportation from France Meltzer Sarah 1891 list of deportation from France Epsztejn Szepsel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1906 Page of Testimony Chodosz Cipa Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1920 Page of Testimony Sinder Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Segalowicz Jechil Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1906 Page of Testimony Kopelowicz Rubin Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1910 Page of Testimony Simon Lea Ilia 1894 Page of Testimony Ekman Zalman Poland Page of Testimony Shneider Rakhel Dubina Braslaw Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Zarecer Haja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1891 Page of Testimony Chajkin Dawid Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1881 Page of Testimony Jaroszewski Jankiel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1909 Page of Testimony Kagan Rubin Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Lawit Sara Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Sherman Sheina* Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Kopelowicz Basja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1895 Page of Testimony Kopelowicz Gita Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1889 Page of Testimony Kopelowicz Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1878 Page of Testimony Alperobicz Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Altman Rachel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1905 Page of Testimony Akselrod Chaja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1912 Page of Testimony Baktorski Ester Wilno Wilno Wilno Poland 1898 Page of Testimony Geler Nekhama Wilno Wilno Wilno Poland 1892 Page of Testimony Eberil Dwosza Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1875 Page of Testimony Eberil Chajm Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1904 Page of Testimony Eberil Elja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1911 Page of Testimony Sinder Isaak Chocienczyce Wilejka Wilno Poland 1904 Page of Testimony Khaikin Gita Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1922 Page of Testimony Kaufman Khana Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1899 Page of Testimony Mazel Modechai Ponivez Panevezys Lithuania 1882 Page of Testimony Eberil Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1938 Page of Testimony Eberil Sara Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1904 Page of Testimony Brunsztyn Mendel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1920 Page of Testimony Rier Yakov Wilno Wilno Wilno Poland 1884 Page of Testimony Mendelson Faige Warszawa Warszawa Warszawa Poland Page of Testimony Kulbak Beila Minsk Minsk City Minsk Belorussia 1880 Page of Testimony Kaufman Shlomo Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Khaykin Lev Ilya Wilejka Wilno Poland 1920 Page of Testimony Norman Chaya Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Elke Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Altuch Mendel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1870 Page of Testimony Alperobicz Wolf Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1902 Page of Testimony Bokser Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Altuch Leja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1872 Page of Testimony Akselrod Jafa Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1915 Page of Testimony Altuch Michal Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1909 Page of Testimony Altman Jeszajahu Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1913 Page of Testimony Unknown Szifra Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1910 Page of Testimony Gitlitz Lea Page of Testimony Nejfach Riwka Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1912 Page of Testimony Sosenski Shmuel Ilia Wilejka Wilno Poland 1898 Page of Testimony Kaufman Sarele Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1937 Page of Testimony Rier Rivka Wilno Wilno Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Kaufman Moshele Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1931 Page of Testimony Khaikin David Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Khaikin Zalman Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1908 Page of Testimony Khaikin Shulia Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1930 Page of Testimony Rier Mordechai Wilno Wilno Wilno Poland Page of Testimony Rier Eliezar Wilno Wilno Wilno Poland 1886 Page of Testimony Rier Beniamin Shavl Siauliai Lithuania 1891 Page of Testimony Khaikin Faina Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1910 Page of Testimony Khaikin Aba Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1936 Page of Testimony Rier Levi Wilno Wilno Wilno Poland 1851 Page of Testimony Szapiro Malka Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1903 Page of Testimony Szapiro Jrmeiahu Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1885 Page of Testimony Shimon Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Jaroszewski Elja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1880 Page of Testimony Apsztejn Szymon Gorodok Poland 1886 Page of Testimony Shapira Malka Lebiedziew Molodeczno Wilno Poland 1905 Page of Testimony Menches Chaja Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1901 Page of Testimony Sznider Ichak Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Szapiro Irmi Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Shpeiregen Shara Dunilovichi Postawy Wilno Poland 1906 Page of Testimony Brunsztejn Yakob Ilia Page of Testimony Brunsztejn Elimelach Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1924 Page of Testimony Sinder Elia Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1900 Page of Testimony Nejfach Rachel Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1913 Page of Testimony Berman Szymon Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1890 Page of Testimony Jesel Chjenka Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1910 Page of Testimony Rogozin Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1912 Page of Testimony Lewin Ilja Wilejka Wilno Poland 1911 Page of Testimony Pliskin Tajbl Dolhinov Wilejka Wilno Poland 1905 Page of Testimony
http://names.yadvashem.org/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_9E
- Thursday, November 18, 2004 at 20:23:08 (EST)
I received two notes about Druya this week; You have a great page on Druya, and I think its the only one I have found. I started researching the family tree a few years ago, and have exhausted all the databases, and online resources. About two years ago, I searched the ALDB and found the following entry from the the local jewish newspaper. I also noticed that you had this listing on your website: MALUSHKEWITZ Etil On occasion of Druyanow-Shpeyer wedding Druja, Lith. Hamelitz #232 year; 1894 MOLZSHKEWITSH Pinchos On occasion of Druyanow-Shpeyer wedding Druja, Lith. Hamelitz #232 year; 1894 I am almost certain that Ethel and Pinchas Molzshkewitsh/Malushkewitz are my great grandparents. My grandfather came to the US at the turn of the century when he was 13, and subsequently his brothers and sisters followed. I have all the family information from the members that relocated to the U.S. I have not been able to find any other information about the family in Russia. Do you have any other information about this family, or could you suggest where I may be able to gather more data about the family in Russia? Regards, Neil J Young ---------------------- > I looked at your page on Druya - it's very interesting, and I congratulate you on putting it together. Obviously a great deal of time and effort has gone into it. > > I really know very little about my family and the Druya connection at this point. In fact I only stumbled across the name Druya at all from the naturalization file for my great-grandfather ISRAEL GOLDBERG in the UK National Archives. Those papers (1905) give his former name as Kus-ne-rov (curiously the hyphens were included throughout the documenatation), subject of Russia, and his birthplace as Druja in the Province of Vilna Russia in November 1856. His parents names are given as MAER KUS-NE-ROV and ESTHER KUS-NE-ROV. Israel came to England sometime between 1890 and 1894, and settled in Preston, Lancashire (which is where I was born). I understand that ISRAEL was already using the name (SORREL) GOLDBERG before he came to England - he served some time in the Russian army > > I have since found an entry on the All Lithuania Database for a KUSHNEROV family in Druya in the 1850 revision lists, giving MEYER and ESTHER KUSHNEROV, which is consistent with Israel's naturalization papers. Israel was married to BESSIE (or BERTHA) ROSOW / ROSEF / ROSEOVE - these variant spellings are used on English birth certificates for their children who were born in England. > > Any further assisatance or directions you can give me would be very gratefully received. As I said in my original query to the SIG, I am a novice in all this, and I don't really have enough time to devote to the research. > Kind regards > Graham Lewis
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- Thursday, November 18, 2004 at 11:26:57 (EST)
.. So excited to find your website!  My husband is descended from Feiwe J. Kramnik, who is listed in your section on the Kramnik Family.  I haven't read it thoroughly yet, but I'm curious to know the relationship. Priscilla Kromnick ---- pjkromnick@aol.com ----------------------------------------------- from Ellis Island; First Name: Feiwe J.-Last Name: Kramnik Ethnicity: Russia - Last Place of Residence: London-- Date of Arrival to Ellis Island: June 14, 1903--- Age at Arrival:  22    Gender:  M    Marital Status:  Single-   Ship of Travel: New York --- Port of Departure: Southampton ---- Manifest Line Number: 0009 ---On the same ship was also; Morris Kramnik - Ethnicity: Russian - Last Place of Residence: London - Date of Arrival: June 14, 1903 - Age at Arrival:  25    Gender:  M    Marital Status:  S  - Ship of Travel: New York - Port of Departure: Southampton - Manifest Line Number: 0013 ---------------------- From Ancestry.com;l Max Kramnik B: abt 1888 - location R: year - city, Essex, Massachusetts Census 1930 United States F... Sarah Kramnik B: abt 1893 R: year - city, Essex, Massachusetts Census 1930 United States F... Leon Kramnik B: abt 1924 R: year - city, Essex, Massachusetts Census 1930 United States F... Tony Kramnik B: abt 1887 R: year - city, NEW YORK, New York Census 1910 United States F... Michael Kramnik B: 1874 - location R: year - city, Lackawanna, Pennsylvania O: year Census 1900 United States F... Mikolai Kramnik B: 1874 - location R: year - city, Lackawanna, Pennsylvania O: year Census 1900 United States F... Izrail Kramnik B: dd mm year D: dd mm 1999 - postal code, city, Cook, Illinois, United States of America O: Illinois Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Cerel Kramnik O: July 06, 1891 Immigration New York City Immigr... Zitke Kramnik O: July 06, 1891 Immigration New York City Immigr... Philip Kromnik O: 06 Jan 1922 Immigration New York County Supr Phillip Kromnick B: abt 1880 - location R: year - city, Kings, New York Census 1930 United States F... Anna Kromnick B: abt 1879 R: year - city, Kings, New York Census 1930 United States F... Beyamer Kromnick B: abt 1906 R: year - city, Kings, New York Census 1930 United States F... Isadore Kromnick B: abt 1913 R: year - city, Kings, New York Census 1930 United States F... Sarah Kromnick B: abt 1910 R: year - city, Kings, New York Census 1930 United States F... Rose Kromnick B: abt 1917 R: year - city, Kings, New York Census 1930 United States F... Morris Kromnick B: abt 1878 R: year - city, Kings, New York Census 1930 United States F... A Bruce Kromnick B: date D: dd mm 1994 - Palm Beach Birth, Marriage, & Death Florida Death Index,... Benjamin Kromnick B: dd mm year D: dd mm 1990 - postal code, city, Atlantic, New Jersey, United States of America O: New Jersey Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Helen Kromnick B: dd mm year D: dd mm 1990 - postal code, city, Atlantic, New Jersey, United States of America O: New Jersey Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Hilda Kromnick B: dd mm year D: mm 1976 - postal code, city, Miami-dade, Florida, United States of America O: New York Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Ilene Kromnick B: dd mm year D: mm 1979 O: Pennsylvania O: postal code, city, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States of America Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Isidor Kromnick B: dd mm year D: mm 1970 - postal code, city, Rockland, New York, United States of America O: New York Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Rose Kromnick B: dd mm year D: mm 1984 - postal code, city, Kings, New York, United States of America O: New York Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Hilda Kromnick Hilda Kromnick B: date D: dd mm 1976 - Dade Birth, Marriage, & Death Florida Death Index,... Morris Kromnick See record Immigration Index to Declaration... LEONARD KROMNICK R: postal code, city, NY Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... LORRAINE KROMNICK R: postal code, city, FL Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... MICHAEL KROMNICK R: postal code, city, CA Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... Benjamin Kromnick B: date dd mm year R: city, Bronx, New York O: location Military World War I Draft Re... Morris Kromnick B: date dd mm year R: city, New York, New York O: location Military World War I Draft Re... Philip Kromnick B: date mm year R: city, New York, New York O: location Military World War I Draft Re... A B KROMNICK R: postal code, city, FL Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... LEONARD KROMNICK R: postal code, city, NY Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... MICHAEL KROMNICK R: postal code, city, CA Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... MICHAEL KROMNICK R: postal code, city, FL Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... Philip Joseph Kromnick O: year Family & Local Histories Biography & Genealog... ANNIE FRIEDMAN KROMNICK B: date - OTHER COUNTRY D: dd mm 1940 - location Birth, Marriage, & Death California Death Ind... Edward Kramnick B: abt 1885 - location R: year - city, Summit, Ohio Census 1930 United States F... Rose M Kramnick B: abt 1885 R: year - city, Summit, Ohio Census 1930 United States F... Max Kramnick B: location D: dd mm 1973 - location Birth, Marriage, & Death Massachusetts Death ... Sigmund Kramnick B: location D: dd mm 1973 - location Birth, Marriage, & Death Massachusetts Death ... CHARL KRAMNICK B: year D: dd mm 1964 - city, New Haven, Connecticut R: city, New Haven, Connecticut Birth, Marriage, & Death Connecticut Death In... LEON KRAMNICK KRAMNICK B: dd mm year - Poland D: dd mm 1997 - city, Hartford, Connecticut R: city, Hartford, Connecticut Birth, Marriage, & Death Connecticut Death In... Bernard Kramnick B: dd mm year D: mm 1964 O: New York Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Charles Kramnick B: dd mm year D: mm 1964 O: Connecticut O: Connecticut Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Jennie Kramnick B: dd mm year D: dd mm 2002 - postal code, city, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States of America O: New Jersey Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Leon Kramnick B: dd mm year D: dd mm 1997 - postal code, city, Hartford, Connecticut, United States of America O: Massachusetts Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Max Kramnick B: dd mm year D: mm 1973 - postal code, city, Essex, Massachusetts, United States of America O: Massachusetts Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Sigmund Kramnick B: dd mm year D: mm 1973 O: Massachusetts Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... William Kramnick B: dd mm year D: dd mm 1997 - postal code, city, Chenango, New York, United States of America O: New York Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Anna Kramnick Vincent Kramnick B: dd mm year D: dd mm 1940 Trees & Communities OneWorldTree SM Husband Kramnick see record Trees & Communities OneWorldTree SM Vincent Kramnick B: year M: year Trees & Communities OneWorldTree SM CLAUDINE KRAMNICK TOM R: postal code, city, NJ Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... ISAAC KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, NY Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... ISAAC KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, NY Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... JONATHAN KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, NY Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... L KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, NJ Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... REBECCA KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, NJ Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... SCOTT KRAMNICK PATRICIA R: postal code, city, VA Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... ISAAC KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, NY Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... JONATHAN KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, MD Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... REBECCA KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, NY Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... SCOTT KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, VA Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... SCOTT KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, VA Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... TOM KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, NJ Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... Iva Lois Brobst Husband Kramnick B: year - OH, USA D: 1942 Trees & Communities OneWorldTree SM Anton Siusta Anna Kramnick B: dd mm year - city, Poland M: year D: dd mm 1929 Trees & Communities OneWorldTree SM Mary Andruskiewicz Vincent Kramnick see record Trees & Communities OneWorldTree SM Isaac Kramnick O: year Family & Local Histories Biography & Genealog... By Brendan McCarthy O: 25 Mar 2004 - Jennings, LA, US Birth, Marriage, & Death Obituary Collection By Brendan McCarthy Paull Frances Kramnick O: 31 Mar 2004 - Chicago, IL, US Birth, Marriage, & Death Obituary Collection By Brendan McCarthy Rebecca Frances Kramnick O: 31 Mar 2004 - San Bernardino, CA, US Birth, Marriage, & Death Obituary Collection By Brendan McCarthy Rebecca Frances Kramnick O: 31 Mar 2004 - Boston, MA, US Birth, Marriage, & Death Obituary Collection EMELIA MARY BLOCK KRAMNICK B: date D: dd mm 1955 1955 - SAINT LOUIS Birth, Marriage, & Death Minnesota Death Inde... FELIX EDWARD SHUSTA KRAMNICK B: date D: dd mm 1971 1971 - CARLTON Birth, Marriage, & Death Minnesota Death Inde... Emelia Siusta Anna Kramnick B: dd mm year - Poland D: dd mm 1955 Trees & Communities OneWorldTree SM
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- Wednesday, November 17, 2004 at 14:04:15 (EST)
.. So excited to find your website!  My husband is descended from Feiwe J. Kramnik, who is listed in your section on the Kramnik Family.  I haven't read it thoroughly yet, but I'm curious to know the relationship. Priscilla Kromnick ---- pjkromnick@aol.com ----------------------------------------------- from Ellis Island; First Name: Feiwe J.-Last Name: Kramnik Ethnicity: Russia - Last Place of Residence: London-- Date of Arrival to Ellis Island: June 14, 1903--- Age at Arrival:  22    Gender:  M    Marital Status:  Single-   Ship of Travel: New York --- Port of Departure: Southampton ---- Manifest Line Number: 0009 ---On the same ship was also; Morris Kramnik - Ethnicity: Russian - Last Place of Residence: London - Date of Arrival: June 14, 1903 - Age at Arrival:  25    Gender:  M    Marital Status:  S  - Ship of Travel: New York - Port of Departure: Southampton - Manifest Line Number: 0013 ---------------------- From Ancestry.com;l Max Kramnik B: abt 1888 - location R: year - city, Essex, Massachusetts Census 1930 United States F... Sarah Kramnik B: abt 1893 R: year - city, Essex, Massachusetts Census 1930 United States F... Leon Kramnik B: abt 1924 R: year - city, Essex, Massachusetts Census 1930 United States F... Tony Kramnik B: abt 1887 R: year - city, NEW YORK, New York Census 1910 United States F... Michael Kramnik B: 1874 - location R: year - city, Lackawanna, Pennsylvania O: year Census 1900 United States F... Mikolai Kramnik B: 1874 - location R: year - city, Lackawanna, Pennsylvania O: year Census 1900 United States F... Izrail Kramnik B: dd mm year D: dd mm 1999 - postal code, city, Cook, Illinois, United States of America O: Illinois Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Cerel Kramnik O: July 06, 1891 Immigration New York City Immigr... Zitke Kramnik O: July 06, 1891 Immigration New York City Immigr... Philip Kromnik O: 06 Jan 1922 Immigration New York County Supr Phillip Kromnick B: abt 1880 - location R: year - city, Kings, New York Census 1930 United States F... Anna Kromnick B: abt 1879 R: year - city, Kings, New York Census 1930 United States F... Beyamer Kromnick B: abt 1906 R: year - city, Kings, New York Census 1930 United States F... Isadore Kromnick B: abt 1913 R: year - city, Kings, New York Census 1930 United States F... Sarah Kromnick B: abt 1910 R: year - city, Kings, New York Census 1930 United States F... Rose Kromnick B: abt 1917 R: year - city, Kings, New York Census 1930 United States F... Morris Kromnick B: abt 1878 R: year - city, Kings, New York Census 1930 United States F... A Bruce Kromnick B: date D: dd mm 1994 - Palm Beach Birth, Marriage, & Death Florida Death Index,... Benjamin Kromnick B: dd mm year D: dd mm 1990 - postal code, city, Atlantic, New Jersey, United States of America O: New Jersey Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Helen Kromnick B: dd mm year D: dd mm 1990 - postal code, city, Atlantic, New Jersey, United States of America O: New Jersey Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Hilda Kromnick B: dd mm year D: mm 1976 - postal code, city, Miami-dade, Florida, United States of America O: New York Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Ilene Kromnick B: dd mm year D: mm 1979 O: Pennsylvania O: postal code, city, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States of America Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Isidor Kromnick B: dd mm year D: mm 1970 - postal code, city, Rockland, New York, United States of America O: New York Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Rose Kromnick B: dd mm year D: mm 1984 - postal code, city, Kings, New York, United States of America O: New York Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Hilda Kromnick Hilda Kromnick B: date D: dd mm 1976 - Dade Birth, Marriage, & Death Florida Death Index,... Morris Kromnick See record Immigration Index to Declaration... LEONARD KROMNICK R: postal code, city, NY Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... LORRAINE KROMNICK R: postal code, city, FL Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... MICHAEL KROMNICK R: postal code, city, CA Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... Benjamin Kromnick B: date dd mm year R: city, Bronx, New York O: location Military World War I Draft Re... Morris Kromnick B: date dd mm year R: city, New York, New York O: location Military World War I Draft Re... Philip Kromnick B: date mm year R: city, New York, New York O: location Military World War I Draft Re... A B KROMNICK R: postal code, city, FL Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... LEONARD KROMNICK R: postal code, city, NY Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... MICHAEL KROMNICK R: postal code, city, CA Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... MICHAEL KROMNICK R: postal code, city, FL Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... Philip Joseph Kromnick O: year Family & Local Histories Biography & Genealog... ANNIE FRIEDMAN KROMNICK B: date - OTHER COUNTRY D: dd mm 1940 - location Birth, Marriage, & Death California Death Ind... Edward Kramnick B: abt 1885 - location R: year - city, Summit, Ohio Census 1930 United States F... Rose M Kramnick B: abt 1885 R: year - city, Summit, Ohio Census 1930 United States F... Max Kramnick B: location D: dd mm 1973 - location Birth, Marriage, & Death Massachusetts Death ... Sigmund Kramnick B: location D: dd mm 1973 - location Birth, Marriage, & Death Massachusetts Death ... CHARL KRAMNICK B: year D: dd mm 1964 - city, New Haven, Connecticut R: city, New Haven, Connecticut Birth, Marriage, & Death Connecticut Death In... LEON KRAMNICK KRAMNICK B: dd mm year - Poland D: dd mm 1997 - city, Hartford, Connecticut R: city, Hartford, Connecticut Birth, Marriage, & Death Connecticut Death In... Bernard Kramnick B: dd mm year D: mm 1964 O: New York Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Charles Kramnick B: dd mm year D: mm 1964 O: Connecticut O: Connecticut Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Jennie Kramnick B: dd mm year D: dd mm 2002 - postal code, city, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States of America O: New Jersey Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Leon Kramnick B: dd mm year D: dd mm 1997 - postal code, city, Hartford, Connecticut, United States of America O: Massachusetts Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Max Kramnick B: dd mm year D: mm 1973 - postal code, city, Essex, Massachusetts, United States of America O: Massachusetts Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Sigmund Kramnick B: dd mm year D: mm 1973 O: Massachusetts Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... William Kramnick B: dd mm year D: dd mm 1997 - postal code, city, Chenango, New York, United States of America O: New York Birth, Marriage, & Death Social Security Deat... Anna Kramnick Vincent Kramnick B: dd mm year D: dd mm 1940 Trees & Communities OneWorldTree SM Husband Kramnick see record Trees & Communities OneWorldTree SM Vincent Kramnick B: year M: year Trees & Communities OneWorldTree SM CLAUDINE KRAMNICK TOM R: postal code, city, NJ Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... ISAAC KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, NY Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... ISAAC KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, NY Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... JONATHAN KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, NY Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... L KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, NJ Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... REBECCA KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, NJ Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... SCOTT KRAMNICK PATRICIA R: postal code, city, VA Directories 2000 Phone and Addre... ISAAC KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, NY Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... JONATHAN KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, MD Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... REBECCA KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, NY Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... SCOTT KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, VA Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... SCOTT KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, VA Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... TOM KRAMNICK R: postal code, city, NJ Directories 1994 Phone and Addre... Iva Lois Brobst Husband Kramnick B: year - OH, USA D: 1942 Trees & Communities OneWorldTree SM Anton Siusta Anna Kramnick B: dd mm year - city, Poland M: year D: dd mm 1929 Trees & Communities OneWorldTree SM Mary Andruskiewicz Vincent Kramnick see record Trees & Communities OneWorldTree SM Isaac Kramnick O: year Family & Local Histories Biography & Genealog... By Brendan McCarthy O: 25 Mar 2004 - Jennings, LA, US Birth, Marriage, & Death Obituary Collection By Brendan McCarthy Paull Frances Kramnick O: 31 Mar 2004 - Chicago, IL, US Birth, Marriage, & Death Obituary Collection By Brendan McCarthy Rebecca Frances Kramnick O: 31 Mar 2004 - San Bernardino, CA, US Birth, Marriage, & Death Obituary Collection By Brendan McCarthy Rebecca Frances Kramnick O: 31 Mar 2004 - Boston, MA, US Birth, Marriage, & Death Obituary Collection EMELIA MARY BLOCK KRAMNICK B: date D: dd mm 1955 1955 - SAINT LOUIS Birth, Marriage, & Death Minnesota Death Inde... FELIX EDWARD SHUSTA KRAMNICK B: date D: dd mm 1971 1971 - CARLTON Birth, Marriage, & Death Minnesota Death Inde... Emelia Siusta Anna Kramnick B: dd mm year - Poland D: dd mm 1955 Trees & Communities OneWorldTree SM
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- Wednesday, November 17, 2004 at 14:04:15 (EST)
My father, Benjamin Gorrelick was born in Volozin, in 1907; his father was Abraham Gorrelick ( a melamed) and his mother was Sarah Cohen. My grandfathear came to this country before the first world war broke out and then the rest of the family had to wait until the war was over to come to N.Y. City, in 1921. My grandmother came with her four children, Sol, Nettie, Lillian and my father, Benjamin who the eldest. My grandfather was a Hebrew teacher, in New York and my father went to the Dewitt Clinton Elementary School, which he did in a year and a half and eventually went to City College; then he became a rabbi at the Jewish Theological Seminary. Most of his rabbinic career (49 years) was spent in Detroit, Michigan. He died in 1998. Does anyone recognize the name "GORRELICK" or Cohen from Volozin? ------------------------- Elisheva Gorrelick Ellis (eliellis@hotmail.com) -------------------------------------------- Subject: Re: a note on the guest book---- Shalom Eilat--------------------Sorry for the scum on the guest book It's a real disaster. As for Avraham Gorrelick, Yes, the late Mr.  Reuven Rogovin wrote some "figures drawing's about our Melamdim". The fourth drawing (the last one) he dedicated to "The Teacher-Melamed, Rabbi Avraham Gorrelick" (page 484 on the Volozhin Yizkor Book). Reading it one can feel Mr. Rogovin's big esteem and love for his Rabbi and Teacher. Here is the word-to-word translation from Hebrew to English I accomplished after receiving your Email: I should post online at the Jewishgen site-Volozhin Yizkor Book section, the English version after its final edition.  ---- --------  The Melamed and Teacher, Rabbi Avraham Gorellick, By Reuven Rogovin (VYB page 484)----From Hebrew by M. Porat --- ...........................Last but not least, was my teacher; Reb Avrom Gorelik. His Heyder was a reformed Heyder. Mr. Gorrelick was an enlightened and educated teacher, who endlessly loved the Hebrew language. He was the first pioneer in Volozhin and its vicinity to introduce the Hebrew language in the Heyder as a subject of learning obligation. On the Heyder wall was suspended an announcement written in huge letters "SPEAK HEBREW!" Hebrew became for the first time a subject of learning duty the same as Mathematics, Geography, History etc. At those times, it was a novelty, a changeover in the education method. As a teacher he was strict and pedantic, demanding from his pupils' such accomplishments which were seen as "unobtainable". He allocated me two days only to learn by heart a Bialik's poem "The Slaughter City". Two days he allocated also to learn Bialik's "Dead of the Desert". For "The Hamatmid" he gave me three days and to learn by heart Yalag's "Between the Lion's teeth" one single day only. The Heyder was situated inside Rohke the Widow's (Rohke Di Almone) apartment on the Smorgon Street (Smorgoner Gass), near to Hayim Der Shnayder (the Taylor) house. On the second year of its existence, the Heyder removed to Brovarna Street near "Avrom Der Vafernik's" house. Reb Hayim der Shnayder used to enter the Heyder at evening hours and to enjoy himself  extremely when he heard the "Moyshelakh" and "Shloymelah" speaking loudly in the Holy Language.All the children, Reb Gorrelick's students, apart of "Mihl Lea Dines" and the writer of these lines had been slaughtered in one single day, together with their loving admirer Reb Hayim der Shnayder. "Swords were pulled out and bows tensed by wicked godless murderers to defeat poor and pauper and to slaughter the right and honest" (Book of psalms 37, 14)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/volozhin/volozhin.html#ROG
- Thursday, November 11, 2004 at 22:22:26 (EST)
Dear Eilat I'm sending you 4 files 1 - Text by me in Hebrew about my father and "Exodus". 2 - Story By father (Ytzhak Norman, a survivor from Dolhinov) about Exodus 1947, the heroic and sad story of the strong-willed refugees. their tragic odyssey, which ended in Lübeck rather than Palestine, was an important factor in the founding of the State of Israel. 3 - Story By father part 2 see in Norman family (#21, 22, 23)--- http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/norman.html 4 - The special picture that was printed on the cover of Davar newspaper in 1947 with our father during the disembarkation of the Exodus 1947 in Haifa---- http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pix/norman/111104_15d_b.gif Toda Yossie ----------------------When the Exodus 1947 was boarded off the coast of Palestine UNSCOP ( Special Committee to find a solution to the conflict between the Arabs and the ever growing Jewish population in Palestine) was sitting in the British mandate of Palestine. Committee members observed the disembarkation of the Exodus 1947 in Haifa. They asked Rev. Grauen two questions: Did the British attack in international waters? He answered: Yes. Did the refugees defend themselves with guns? He answered: No. The refugees were however prepared to give up their lives in their attempt to enter Palestine. There are grounds for the supposition that the dramatic experience of the Exodus tragedy led to the majority vote of this Special Committee to divide Palestine into an Arab and a Jewish state. On 29th November 1947, the United Nations Assembly voted according to the Special Committee's recommendation. The way was thereby smoothed for the foundation of a Jewish state. .... for more details go to http://www.rrz.uni-hamburg.de/rz3a035/exodus194728.html The Struggle To Survive---- By Ytzhak Norman of Ramat Gan, p. 596 of the Dolginovo Yizkor book----- On the 22nd of June, 1941, Molotov, the foreign minister of the Soviet Union, announced a surprise attack on Russia and immediately panic broke out. Previous months had seen high rates of unemployment in Dolhinov, and some of the youths had found jobs in Vileyka. I was amongst them. That day, numerous trains left Vileyka, all crowded with people who wanted to retreat deep into the Soviet Union. All the young men from Dolhinov met to decide what to do. A decision was made in favor of returning to Dolhinov, where our families lived. We believed there was no reason travel deep into the Soviet Union as there was no way that the powerful Red Army could be defeated. We thought that the army would recover quickly and serve as an iron fence to protect us, eventually defeating the Nazis. We left on foot and walked by night. We returned to Dolhinov and found that everyone was well, but in a dark, depressed mood. Even worse was the extreme delight and celebratory mood of the Polish population toward the Russian withdrawal. The Poles arrived at the gates of the town, prepared as if to greet a most respected guest, waiting for the Germans to arrive, bring them bread, salt, and flowers. Their first reaction was to loot all the stores that were still filled with Soviet merchandise, especially food and alcohol. They started a looting party, when, all of a sudden, a small Russian unit returned in armored cars. We didnt know where the Russians had come from, but immediately they began to bring order back to the town. They even shot some of the looters, and all the Christians started running away. Some were wounded and one was killed. A Soviet soldier made an excited speech that a day of great vengeance would come. The soldiers then went back into their armored car and left town. After the day they left the central market of Dolhinov in this manner, we did not see the Red Army until the area was freed in 1944. Life Continues In Town Life in town became very difficult. At first we were able to receive food, but there were ominous signs of death in the air. Although there were no specific threats at that moment, we knew violence could erupt at any time. Occasionally, German soldiers would arrive in town to spend a few nights here, and any communal activity became very difficult. They started giving us orders via the Judenrat. We had to supply the soldiers with everything they needed, and we never had the option to refuse. Like this, we continued with life. Each day we had to be present for forced labor. It seems that there wasnt a day without someone dying, amongst them some of my relatives. Chaim Itzhak Pressman was executed outside of town by a German who we called Der Schwartzer Yakke (the Black German). During those days, Jewish runaways from Minsk and Pleshensitz arrived in town and told us about what had occurred in their areas. Their entire Jewish communities was rounded up and killed, and only a few were able to hide and escape. All of this foretold of what was to become of us, too. We started praying together in private homes. Even people who were not observant prior to the war now became religious, and we all hoped that the day Geula (the arrival of the Messiah or in this case the defeat of the Nazis) would soon come, and with it would arrive the day of revenge. For the rest of Ytzhak Normans' story during the holocaust go to; http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/dolhinov/d_pages/d_stories_struggle.html
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/dolhinov/d_pages/d_stories_struggle.html
- Thursday, November 11, 2004 at 20:03:51 (EST)
Making of a Godol: A Study of Episodes in the Lives of Great Torah Personalities, Volume 1 By Nathan Kamenetsky ( son of Rabbi Yaakov Kamenetsky who grew up in Dolhinov, Minsk and Kovno...) http://www.forward.com/issues/2003/03.03.14/arts1.html ....Rabbi Nathan Kamenetsky, educated in yeshivas and subsequently a teacher in them, describes himself as an "autodidact in secular knowledge." The focus of his research is the life of his father, Rabbi Yakov Kamenetsky (grew up in Dolhinov), who attended the famed yeshiva in Slobodka a suburb of Kovno, Lithuania during its glory years during the first quarter of the 20th century. Following World War II, he served as Talmud professor and dean at the Torah Vodaath Rabbinical Seminary in New York City, until his retirement in 1968. He died in 1986 at the age of 95. The elder Kamenetsky was a member of the Moetzes Gedolei HaTorah (Council of Torah Sages) of Agudath Israel. ----The book should destroy, once and for all, any lingering idyllic notion that pre-war Eastern European Jewry lived a religiously untroubled existence. Already at the turn of the 20th century the world of Jewish tradition was dissolving, as many Jews jettisoned ritual observances. We learn that Yakov Kamenetsky and a number of his fellow students at the yeshiva were the sole members of their families to retain Orthodox ties, and that even children of the most pious and learned among the rabbinical elite the author names several of them left the fold. The proximate cause of these defections was the reading of secular books, a pastime frowned upon by Orthodox tradition. Such reading was widespread even among those young yeshiva boys who, in the end, stayed Orthodox and became leading rabbis. Yakov Kamenetsky himself, for example, achieved the equivalent of a high-school diploma through private tutoring, and his classmate, the future charismatic leader of American Orthodoxy Rabbi Aaron Kotler, loved Russian literature, especially the works of Alexander Pushkin. ...... The exposure that generation of yeshiva students had to the broader world of ideas helps explain the puzzling fact that those European-educated rabbis who taught in American yeshivas in the three decades after World War II were for the most part more open to secular knowledge (Kotler being the exception) than their American-born counterparts, who tended to justify college attendance only for the purpose of making a living. There is, indeed, a wonderful vignette of Rabbi Kamenetsky, in later years, mentioning "Anna Karenina" to his uncomprehending Torah Vodaath students in New York and expressing shock that they never heard of Leo Tolstoy's masterpiece.... ..... The bitter ideological divisions within the late-19th- and early-20th-century Jewish community found expression even within the walls of the yeshivas, institutions that we are accustomed to viewing as havens in the storm. Many of the students were secret or open revolutionaries, dedicated to overthrowing the czarist Russian regime that then ruled Lithuania. They sporadically carried out violent demonstrations against the yeshiva administrations, which they saw as collaborating with the government. The dean of the famous yeshiva in Telz, in fact, closed down his school for two months during 1905 so as to rid himself of such troublemakers and repopulate the yeshiva with more politically reliable young men. ..... The internal conflict that receives the most attention in this book, however, will seem far more esoteric to those unfamiliar with the arcana of Orthodoxy, specifically the great struggle over Musar (ethical teachings). In the mid-19th century, Rabbi Yisrael Salanter, one of the most original thinkers in the history of Lithuanian Jewry, criticized his community for neglecting the serious study of ethical texts. By concentrating on intellectual analysis and punctilious performance of the ritual, Salanter felt, Jews had lost the sense of closeness to God, leaving their young people vulnerable to the pull of secular movements. Salanter advocated studying Jewish ethical literature in an atmosphere of spiritual arousal, so that proper conduct toward one's fellow man might regain what he considered its original importance within Judaism.After Salanter's death in 1883, the question of whether Musar should become part of the yeshiva curriculum led to disputes, with many of the rabbis considering such study bitul Torah, a waste of time that could better be spent studying the Talmud, and warning that too much moral introspection was psychologically unhealthy. The pro- and anti-Musar forces sometimes came to blows, and some yeshivas split into two over the issue. In Slobodka, we learn, there were actually two yeshivas; one, Kneseth Yisrael, where Kamenetsky studied, emphasized Musar, and the other, Kneseth Yitzchak, did not. The book presents a fascinating picture of Rabbi Noson Zvi Finkel, known as the "Alter" (old man), the chief Musar instructor at Kneseth Yisrael. This complex man was, on the surface, a gentle, nurturing father figure who inspired scores of students, but he was at the same time a controlling personality who carefully monitored the personal lives of his charges, even having their mail opened and read if he suspected that they were receiving letters from ideologically suspect correspondents. Author Nathan Kamenetsky's foreword demonstrates that he fully expected charedi criticism of this book. He acknowledges the existence of a school of thought within Orthodox circles that denies the importance of factual history, preferring the production of "stories" of the past that teach edifying religious lessons. He quotes one rabbinic advocate of this approach as saying, "We do not need realism: we need inspiration from our forefathers." But Kamenetsky has gone a different route, following the dictum of another rabbi who said, "You cannot educate through lies." In doing so, Kamenetsky has charted a new and exciting path in Orthodox historiography...

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- Wednesday, October 27, 2004 at 19:50:51 (EDT)
Parshas Lech Lecha Long Distance Call Volume 7 Issue 3 by Rabbi Mordechai Kamenetzky Good deeds deserve good dividends, but there is one deed mentioned in this week's portion that is veiled in anonymity. However, its dividends lasted so forcefully that the impact was realized almost 500 years later. The Torah tells us about a war that took place. Avram's nephew Lot was captured. The Torah tells us "Then there came the fugitive and told Abram, the Ivri, who dwelt in the plains of Mamre" (Genesis 14:13) It obscures the name of the refugee and does not even directly state his message. The next verse, in a seemingly disjointed manner, tells us, "and Abram heard that his kinsman was taken captive, he armed his disciples who had been born in his house -- three hundred and eighteen -- and he pursued them as far as Dan" (ibid v.14).The Medrash tells us that the refugee was Og, a giant of a man who escaped an attack on his fellow giants. He informed Avram that his nephew was alive, albeit taken prisoner with malevolent intent. He figured that Avram would try to liberate Lot and be killed in battle. Og would then marry Sora. (Perhaps that is the reason that the Torah seems to separate what Avram heard from what the refugee told.) For this piece of disguised information, Og receives a seemingly disproportionate reward. He is granted not only longevity, as he lived until the final days of the Jews sojourn through the desert, but also the impact of his deed was so potent that Moshe was afraid to attack him before entering the Land of Canaan! Imagine. Og lived for 470 years after the deed, and then Moshe had to be reassured that he need not fear his merits! Rabbi Berel Zisman, one of the few remaining from his illustrious family of prominent Lubavitch Chasidim spent a portion of World War II in a concentration camp in Munich. After the war, he was allowed entry to the United States, but had to wait in the town of Bremerhaven for six weeks. During that time he decided to travel to Bergen-Belsen the notorious concentration camp which was transformed to a displaced person camp to visit a cousin who was there. Dozens of inmates came over to him with names of loved ones scattered across the free plains of the USA. They wanted to get them messages. Berel took their messages. To Sam Finkel from Abraham Gorecki: "I am alive and recuperating. Please try to guarantee employment to allow me to enter the US." And so on. One card was for Jacob Kamenecki from a niece from Minsk. Please be aware that I survived the war and will be going back to Minsk." Armed with lists of names and some addresses, Berel arrived in the US where he became a student in the Lubavitch Yeshiva in Crown Heights. Knowing no English, upon his arrival he asked a cousin to address postcards. Each had a message written in Yiddish "My name is Berel Zisman. I have just arrived from Europe - and have regards from"He filled in the blanks and ended the brief note on each card with, "for further information, I can be contacted at the Lubavitch Yeshiva, corner Bedford and Dean in Crown Heights." Rabbi. Zisman does not really now how many people received his cards, but one person who lived in a basement apartment on Hewes Street definitely did. When Rabbi Jacob Kamenecki, one of the United States' leading sages, came to the Lubavitch yeshiva looking for Berel Zisman, a war refugee who had arrived at the yeshiva only a week ago, no one knew why. Berel was called out of the study hall and met the elderly man, filled him in on all the particulars about the status of his relative, and returned to his place. When the young man returned to his seat, he was shocked at the celebrity treatment he once again received. "You mean you don't know who that Rabbi was? He is the Rosh Yeshiva of Torah Voda'ath!" Berel shuddered, feeling terrible that he made the revered scholar visit him. A while later, he met the Rosh Yeshiva and approached him. "Rebbe, please forgive me, I had no intention to make you come to me to get regards. Had I known who you were I would surely have gone to your home and given the information to you in person! Reb Yaakov was astounded. He refused to accept the apology. "Heaven forbid! Do you realize what kind of solace I have hearing about the survival of my relative. I came to you, not only to hear the news, but to thank you, in person, for delivering it!" Imagine. Avram was nearly 80 years old, he had no descendants, and the only link to the house of his father's family -- at least documented as a disciple of Avram's philosophies -- was Lot. Now even the whereabouts and future of that man were unknown. And when Og delivered the news of his whereabouts, perhaps Avram's hope for the future was rekindled. Perhaps his gratitude toward Og abounded. And though Og spoke one thing, and Avram heard another, the reward for the impact on Avram's peace of mind was amazingly powerful. We often make light of actions and ramifications. The Torah tells us this week, in a saga that ends five books and some four hundred years later, that small tidings travel a very long distance. Dedicated by Mark & Deedee Honigsfeld in memory of Joseph Gross -- Yoseph Zvi ben Dovid Yaakov 7 Marcheshvan and Bluma Honigsfeld, Bluma bas Shlomo Chaim 10 Marcheshvan and by Linda and Sheldon Pfeffer in memory of Benjamin Levine --Binyamin Ben Zvi Hirsh -- 11 Marcheshvan
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- Wednesday, October 27, 2004 at 19:30:09 (EDT)
Do you have any info about Rabbi jacob Kamenetsky (Kamenecki) origanally from Dolhinev? freedman@jewishvalues.us From the internet; http://chareidi.shemayisrael.com/archives5761/vayakhel/features2.htm IN-DEPTH FEATURES Reb Yaakov Kamenetsky In honor of his yahrtzeit, 29 Adarby D. Rachelson In Koloshova, the family of R' Binyomin Kamenetsky was not particularly distinguished. A Torah-observant home where the father worked and earned a respectable livelihood, things would have remained just the same had Heaven not ordained otherwise. In an interesting twist of fate, the father of Reb Binyomin, a timber-dealer and owner of a large flour mill, lost all his business in one night due to the decree of the Russian Tzar.Thus, after the birth of their son Yaakov on 21 Adar, Reb Binyomin moved to a tiny hamlet by the name of Dolhinov. Reb Yaakov later pointed out that had it not been for this move, he would probably have grown up an ordinary businessman and would never have absorbed the unquenchable love of Torah that was prevalent in this small village.His father would take him on Friday night at two in the morning to the beis medrash where the place hummed with learning as though it was midday. The hall was full of people studying Torah, each one according to his level: one learned a shiur on Alshich, another on gemora, and yet another a shiur iyun.In the cheder of this village the hours were long, so long that Reb Yaakov's mother would pack together with his lunch an oil lamp to be used when darkness fell and the boys continued learning.At the age of eleven, he left home to learn in the yeshiva of Minsk. After he passed the entry exam of the rosh yeshiva, HaRav Shlomo Glovenchitz, the latter still doubted whether he should accept him, due to his youth. "You are not even bar mitzvah yet."With childish innocence, the young Yaakov replied, "Well, I came here to learn, not to be the tenth man of a minyan."After a time, the Kamenetsky household moved to Minsk where they hosted the friends of Reb Yaakov, amongst others the future Rav Grozovsky, zt"l, and the young Aaron Kotler, zt"l.Shortly after Pesach in 5665 (1905), Reb Yaakov and Reb Aaron traveled to Slobodke to learn under the supervision of the Alter of Slobodke zt"l. Reb Yaakov also learned in the Yeshivos of Slutzk, Krinik and Moltsh.During World War I he took refuge in Lomza in the yeshiva of Reb Yechiel Michel Gordon zt"l. On 22 Sivan, 5679 (1919), he married the Rebbetzin Ita Ettel, daughter of the Mashgiach Reb Ber Hirsch Heller, zt"l, known in Slobodke as "Der Yunger Mashgiach."From 5681 to 5686, he learned in a kollel in Slobodke that was known for its distinguished members and subsequently he took on the Rabbinate in various places.On 11th Av 5697 (1937) he left for America. His plan was to collect money for the Slobodke Kollel and to cover the debts he incurred from his years as rov in Zitivian, but in fact his future lay in being the "manhig hador" and Hashgocho forced him to stay in America, where he was appointed rov in Toronto. In 5705 (1945), he accepted the request of Reb Shraga Feivel Mendelovitz, zt"l, that he take up the position of rosh yeshiva in Mesivta Torah Vodaas. From this standpoint he disseminated Torah for the rest of his life, standing as a sentry on duty for the Torah's ideals.Reb Yaakov merited to live a long life, his mind lucid and clear till the very end. His chidushim were printed in his seforim Emes LeYaakov, on Torah and on Shas.On 29th Adar 5746 (1986), his pure soul left this world. As he requested, he was buried in Brooklyn, since he pointed out that most of his family live in America and would not always be able to travel to his kever in Eretz Yisroel. From this, his last request we learn yet another chapter of his feelings for others.****************************The words of Chazal in Pirkei Ovos "Ohev es habrios umekarvon laTorah" were the guides and practice of Reb Yaakov throughout his life. Not differentiating between young and old, elderly and even little children, or those who didn't live according to the Torah way of life, Reb Yaakov loved them all."Loving your fellow Jew is a mitzvah in the Torah, and in addition it's a segulah that if the love is given according to the Torah it will bring its recipients closer to Torah and to Hashem." So said Reb Yaakov and so did he.Reb Yaakov was once in the waiting room of a doctor's surgery. Waiting together with him was a young Jewish boy from a totally nonobservant home. Reb Yaakov took a ball and began playing with the child. The talmid accompanying Reb Yaakov was astonished, and pointed out to Reb Yaakov his wonder at the Rov's behavior. "This child will think that a religious rabbi sits and plays ball instead of learning -- or at least he should talk to the boy, convince him to become a baal teshuvah."Reb Yaakov explained, "I saw that with this boy, it is impossible to talk about Yiddishkeit or mitzvos. He comes from a family so far removed from anything Jewish. I just wanted that his picture of a frum Jew should remain one of a pleasant person, so I played ball with him. Who knows, perhaps this impression will one day have an effect on him and he will come closer to Torah and mitzvos.""Once, after my regular study session in my father's home," recounted his son Reb Avrohom, "my father told me that a man and his daughter would soon be coming and requested that I remain in the room when he received the guests. Naturally, I fulfilled his request, but I was quite surprised, for usually when people came to my father I would leave the room and allow them to discuss matters in privacy. When the two of them entered, Reb Yaakov chatted with them, enquiring as to their welfare, occupation, where the father works, which school the daughter goes to, what she learns and more general questions. During the conversation, my father patted me affectionately on the shoulder, and introduced me. `This is my little baby Avrohom,' and continued the conversation. A few minutes later the visit was over and the two of them left the house."Reb Avrohom continued his story, "I was incredulous, wondering what this was all about. I was at the time nearing the end of my 40s and never had I heard my father referring to me as `my little baby.' My father turned to me and explained, `Listen, my son, to what took place here. This father and his daughter, who is the youngest of the family, had a wonderful relationship. He brought her up and educated her in the Torah way, and she accepted and absorbed everything he taught. All was fine, until one day, the father introduced her to a friend of his, saying, `And this is my little baby.' Feeling humiliated by the expression, the daughter was deeply hurt and refused to talk to her father. The latter was broken, since he had not meant to degrade her and his expression was just one of affection for his youngest daughter. She, however, would not be reconciled, and slowly began to cut off all contact with her father.'"Near despair, the father turned to Reb Yaakov knowing that he was the one to turn to. Indeed, Reb Yaakov felt the father's pain, fearing that the girl may perhaps even rebel against her father and her Torah upbringing, chas vesholom, and advised him to bring his daughter to his house on Wednesday. `For that is when I have a shiur with my youngest son, Avrohom. Tell your daughter you have an appointment with me and, if she likes, she may join you.' The daughter was delighted at the privilege of being allowed to go to Reb Yaakov and she arrived together with her father. Some time later, the father contacted Reb Yaakov, thanking him profusely for his wise help and told him that as they left the Rabbi's house, the girl turned to her father. `I see Daddy, that even Reb Yaakov called his son his baby even in front of strangers although he is already a grandfather. Apparently, it's an expression of love of a father to his child,' she enthused. Peace had returned to the household of the man."Engraved on the heart of all his young students are the words spoken by Reb Yaakov at the end of the summer holidays. During the long vacation, Reb Yaakov would travel to Camp Ohr Shraga and learn with the young bochurim as chavrusos. During these sessions of learning in partnership he would not allow any disturbance although his "chavrusoh" was many years younger, so that the young boy would not be hurt.When the summer days were over, Reb Yaakov would turn to his "chavrusos" and say, "Yom Kippur is soon upon us and it's time to make a reckoning. When two people learn together it is very possible that one can unintentionally not treat the other with due respect. I therefore beg your mechiloh in case I slighted you at all in any way."One of his talmidim retells that he was present when Reb Yaakov was writing a letter in the name of the gedolim of America to Reb Yechezkel Abramsky concerning the problem of autopsies. For five long minutes, Reb Yaakov sat, pondering how to acknowledge Reb Yechezkel's Rebbetzin in the letter, who had been the widow of R' Yechiel Michel Gordon, since this was not a private letter, but represented many gedolim and roshei yeshivos. After considerable thought he was pleased to find the right phrase "and we send our brochoh to all who are present in the shadow of Rabbeinu and his Torah," implying the talmidim as well as the Rebbetzin.Reb Yaakov was relieved by this flash of inspiration as he turned to his talmid, "when the letter arrives, R' Yechezkel will probably call his Rebbetzin and show her that she is still remembered in America, thus we will have the mitzvoh of gladdening the heart of an almonoh."End of Part II The Life and Times of HaGaon Rabbi Yaakov Kamenetsky In his 95 years, the gaon Rabbi Yaakov Kamenetsky combined many lives. He was a product of Slabodka and one of the closest disciples of its legendary "Alter," the master molder of great people. He was a confident and advisor or leaders many years his senior. He was the leader of kehillos on Europe and America. He was rosh yeshivah of Torah Vodaath. He was the sage, guide, and counselor of American Torah Jewry for half a century, the man his peers called "the wise man of the generation." To every question and problem, he had the uncanny ability to marshal the entire breadth of his encyclopedic Torah knowledge, an unusually rich life experience, and a clarity of thought that cut to the heart of the situation. To revere Reb Yaakov was inevitable; to know him was impossible. He was accessible to everyone, young and old, on his or her own level, but there were so many layers to him that as soon as someone thought he knew him, he discovered a new dimension of greatness. To an astonishing degree, this book presents a fully rounded portrait of Reb Yaakov. The author has drawn from hundreds of interviews and thousands of recollections to fashion a portrait oh his life and personality. The reader feels rooted to the soil from which Reb Yaakov grew and at home in the many environments where he flourished. And the reader sees how a man saturated with Torah knowledge and the accumulated wisdom of its sages can relate that rich tapestry to both modern people and emerging dilemmas. As one turns the pages of this magnificent book, one is riveted to it. On the last page the reader is warmed and elevated but the conviction that "how fortunate we were to have had him among us, and how doubly fortunate that so much of him could be compressed between the covers of a book." by Yonason Rosenblum ...A story regarding Rabbi Yaakov Kamenetsky captures the spirit which the Jewish person is supposed to have regarding paying taxes. Rabbi Kamenetsky was one of the most prominent Rabbis in America until his passing away in 1985. Once an appreciative congregant gave Rabbi Kamenetsky a silver kiddish cup for a present. Subsequently, it was discovered that Rabbi Kamenetsky took this cup to a silver smith for appraisal. It seemed unusual that such a distinguished person receives a gift and was preoccupied with determining its value. However, later was discovered Rabbi Kamenetsky's true intention in seeking the appraisal. The cup was received for performing Rabbinical services, therefore, Rabbi Kamenetsky decided that its value was taxable income. Rabbi Kamenetsky's diligence must be attributed to his giving intrinsic value to paying taxes. Fear of Internal Revenue Service citations could not motivate such extraordinary dedication. ....Rabbi Yaakov Kamenetsky ztl points out that there is an inherent relationship between rejecting idol worship (i.e. becoming a convert) and offering the Pesach sacrifice. The Torah says (12:21) Draw and take a sheep etc. which Rashi (on verse 12:6) interprets to mean Draw yourself away from idolatry and [then] take a sheep [for the Pesach offering]. Rabbi Kamenetsky ztl, makes a brilliant point. He shows how we find several times in Jewish history that when the Jews did Tshuva and distanced themselves from idol worship, they brought a Pesach offering. In the days of King Hezekiah (Chronicles II ch 30:1) in the days of King Yosheyahu (Chronicles II ch.35:1) and in the days of Ezra (Ezra 6:19), all indicate that when idol worship was rejected by the people one of the first acts done by them was to offer the Pesach sacrifice. These were events which occurred on a national scale, but one could also think, says Rabbi Kamenetsky, that when an individual abandons idol worship and converts to Judaism, he too should bring a Pesach offering. Therefore the Torah adds the phrase and he shall be like the native of the land to teach us that the convert brings his Pesach offering, not when he converts, but when every other Jew (native of the land) does on the 14th of Nisan. ....We will see why Rabbi Yaakov Kamenetsky was described by his peers as the wise man of his generation, and how he had an uncanny ability to peer behind the question and recognize the needs of the person who came to him for guidance..... 5 Great Lives * The Steipler * R' Yaakov Kamenetsky * R' Moshe Feinstein * R' Yehudah Zev Segal * R' SHlomo Zalman Auerbach radio personality Dov Shurin ,Dov's grandfather, HoRav Yaakov Kaminetzky was from Dalhinev / Dolginovo It was an article by Rabbi Moshe Sherer, the head of the Agudas Yisrael in America. He describes how he was travelling by plane, together with Rabbi Yaacov Kaminetzky of blessed memory, to New York, back from a world gathering of Agudas Yisrael in Jerusalem. The seating arrangement was such that R. Sherer was sitting in the row behind R. Kaminetzky, and, as it happened, next to R. Kaminetzky was sitting Yeruham Meshel, the General Secretary of the Histadrut, the Israeli Labor Federation. Mr. Meshel and R. Kaminetzky had a conversation during the trip, which R. Sherer could overhear. Mr. Meshel, who is far from a religious Jew, was asking R. Kaminetzky many questions about Judaism, all of which R. Kaminetzky answered. Finally, as the plane landed in New York, R. Kaminetzky asked Mr. Meshel: "Is there anything I have said to you in the course of our whole conversation which might cause you to change your way of life to be an observant Jew?" "No," Mr. Meshel answered, "there is nothing in what you said that might cause me to change my lifestyle. However there is something you did not say which might make me change my mind -- explain how it is that your son behaves as he does!" Indeed, for most of the trip, R. Kaminetzky's son, R. Shmuel Kaminetzky, instead of sitting down in his own seat, had been standing in the aisle next to his father, making sure he was comfortable, rearranging his cushions, bringing him something to drink, and so on. "I wouldn't dream of asking my children to do anything for me. What is there in Judaism that gets your son to behave in this way?" "It's very simple", replied the Rabbi, "and I can explain it to you briefly. In your outlook, the emphasis is on human progress, human improvement. This means that you look on your grandparents as primitive, as living in the dark ages, and your parents also, to a lesser extent. But it also means that your children, in turn, look on you as backward. So why should they show you honor? In our outlook, it is the opposite. Each generation that is born is one step further removed from the Revelation at Sinai, and so the light of Revelation gets progressively dimmer. This means that each person honors his parents as being one generation closer to Sinai." .....
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- Tuesday, October 26, 2004 at 14:35:49 (EDT)
Avraham Itskhok Hakohen Kook / By E. Leony ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- page 305 in the Volozhin Yizkor Book --------------------------------------------- The most estimated Student of Hanaziv. He became the first chief Rabbi of Eretz Israel, Born in 5625 Elul 16th (1865), in Grayevo. Harav Kook wrote his excellent essay on Hanaziv The Yeshiva Ets Hayim head , published in Knesset Israel 5648 (1888), Died in 5695 Elul 3rd (1.9.1935) in Jerusalem "Mine Avrom-Itshe" So cold Hanaziv his talented student, Avrom Itskhok Hakohen Kook. In Volozhin he was called "The Poniviezh Prodigy", because being in Volozhin he became son-in-law of R' Dovid Rabinovitsh-Teomim from Poniviezh. Harav Kook used to study in the Volozhin Yeshiva eighteen hours per day. Each day he learned sixty pages Gomorrah. The Yeshiva men did notice once that the glass of his kerosene lamp, in light of which he used to study late in the night, disappeared. They discovered that at the end of his daily learning he dismantled and hid the glass. However, what was the reason? The reason was the verse "I am felling the Almighty every time," he wrote on the glass, in order that those words would be in front of him when he was learning. Hanaziv appreciated and estimated his student in such a measure that he ordered to provide the young Prodigy all his material needs. He said; "The Ponivezher is upon all allocations". The article "Glory for the righteous" was his first literary appearance. He published it in the journal "Voice of the Religion holders" as an answer to a criticism of Hanaziv's book "Deepen the Matter". Near this time, he published in "Knesset Israel" journal another article: "The Eyts Hayim Yeshiva Head" (Hanaziv's Annals). The Volozhin time was a time of happiness and pleasure in his life. He wrote then to his parents and friends; "the hours are very dear in Volozhin, in the precious town where Torah is grown". He praised and thanked the Almighty who "guided us in the true way and brought us into this place of Torah". He enjoyed the Volozhin pure and "educational" air, which "makes wise" the Torah student. Harav Kook issued a collection named "Books Ornament" on 1888, a stage for the religious Jewry. Prominent Hassidim and Misnagdim took part in this collection. Among them were the Naziv and the Admor R' Zeev Tverski from Tshernobil. As for his life orientation he followed faithfully R' Hayim Volozhiner's ideas, who taught that the entire world's existence is based on the Holy Torah. Harav Kook emphasizes the purpose of Israel's Torah study and its distribution, which was "Israel's National mission". In his article that carries this name, he claimed that the mission was delivered to our nation and is old like the sun illuminating the earth. The Torah will not exist without Israel as a Nation. Moreover, if Israel, God forbid, will stop to take place the Torah would be forgotten and humanity without Torah will come back to ignorance and idolatry. Nevertheless, he wrote, the most important condition to accomplish our mission is the concentration of the Israeli Nation in the Land of Israel, the land of Holiness. Only here would develop the spirit of our nation to enlighten the world. Harav Kook sees the Jewish Nationality as the basis of Judaism and its essence. Harav Kook once answered a laical Zionist who mocked upon the Jews coming to die in the Holy Land and caring to buy a family grave. The Rabbi told him that the very first settlement (the Cave of Makhpeyla in Hevron) started with a grave. "Give me land for a family grave" asked father Abraham (Breyshit-Genesis, art. 23, verse 4). Also later during the Egypt Exodus went the children of Israel into the Land of Israel carrying the bones of Yosef once more a grave. Anyway, due to those graves and from those graves developed, lives and prospers the Land of Israel. His love of the Israel Land was extraordinary strong. He was not able to breathe foreign countries air. People tell that when coming once to the United States in order to gather money for the Yeshiva's in Erets Israel, he was hosted in a millionaire's sumptuous house. In spite of that, his admirers found him in a state of sadness. Rabbi, why are you so unhappy? The Rabbi answered: "A king went out to the sea on his ship with all his servants. They had the best facilities, excellent food and the best wines. Renowned artists, poets and musicians accompanied the king to make him happy. However, he remained gloomy and sad. One of his ministers asked the king, why are you unhappy, do you lack something? No, I have all I need but I am missing something, I am missing a piece of land." The Rabbi finished the story saying, "God, blessed be his name, provided me with all I need, but something I'm lacking here abroad, I'm lacking the Land of Israel." Harav Kook considered that the Country building was the main purpose of the Jewish people. He did not check in the fringes of the builders. He understood the worker's soul. Religious people complained before him that Halutsim building the Land are frivolous and frequently obscene in matters between human and God, while the Land of Israel is holy. The Rabbi answered, that when the temple existed nobody has right to enter inside it, except the main Priest (Hakohen Hagadol), and even he could enter only once a year, on the Yom Kippur Day and wearing pure white garments. However, at the times of the Temple building, every worker entered the site every day wearing workaday clothes. Moreover, when he received complains that the Halutsim do not put on phylacteries, he would answer that it is enough for them to put a stone upon stone building the Land of Israel. The crown of his actions was the establishment of the Yeshiva "Beit Harav" as the central World School in Jerusalem where from Torah and God's word would come out and propagate into the entire nation.
From Hebrew by M. Porat
- Saturday, October 23, 2004 at 19:31:21 (EDT)
Aiko Ichimura Pavlock is helping with outreach and public relations for the up-coming play "Senpo Sugihara:the Japanese Schindler." You may have heard about this Japanese diplomat who single-handedly wrote over 2000 transit visas to save Polish Jews from the Nazi execution in 1940 while he was working as the Vice Consul in Lithuania. As the result, over 6000 to 8000 Jewish people were saved. The people who received the Sugihara visas has traveled to Russia to Japan and to the final destination of America. Most people who received the Sugihara visas had the Polish [Lithuanian] nationality. The Japanese Government is celebrating the 150th anniversary of the US-Japan friendship by bringing this play to DC and NY in October. NY performance starts tonight and ends on 24th. You can learn about what he did at http://www.chiunesugihara100.com/eng/e-top.htm Pavlock would like as many of Lithuanian American people to know about this great diplomat. Could you help him find people who are related with those Sugihara visa receivers and let them know about Senpo Sugihara:the Japanese Schindler by circulating the information among your audience and group? Thank you so much for your help. Any suggestions as to how to find those people who might be interested in the story, would be very much appreciated. Please respond directly to aikoichimura@erols.com ---- Mark H. Melmed mark@melmed.com
aikoichimura@erols.com
- Friday, October 22, 2004 at 16:06:57 (EDT)
In a message dated 10/20/04 7:21:03 PM Pacific Daylight Time, milton@sciti.com writes: Are there any Litvaks who lived in New Haven, Conneticut who may remember a shochet by name of Max Glick, or members of his family? Back in the 40's, he was very active with his shul and served as something comparable to a "Sargent of Arms," as my childhood memory recalls. He was related to my Lenzner side of the family but I don't know how - and would like to. Please reply privately. Milton Blackstone La Jolla, CA Jews in New Haven COMBINED INDEX FOR VOLUMES I-VII http://gmail.google.com/gmail; Glick's Furniture, II:99 Glick, B., furniture, V: 129 Glick, Bela, VI: 188 Glick, Edward, V: 148 Glick, Esther, VI: 188 Glick, Leon, VI: 188, 189 Glick, Mary Finkelstein, VI: 188 Glick, Morris, furniture, V: 129 Glick, Stanley, VI: 188
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- Friday, October 22, 2004 at 13:51:54 (EDT)
Chaim Soutine (1894 - August 8, 1944) was an expressionist painter. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaim_Soutine----------- Born in Smilovichi, Belarus, he immigrated to Paris in 1911 with his friends Pinchus Kremegne (native of Zhaludak near Lida) and Michel Kikoine (born May 31, 1892 in Rechytsa, Belarus) where he studied at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. He soon developed a highly personal vision and painting technique. For a time, he and his friends lived at La Ruche, a residence for struggling artists in Montparnasse. In 1923, the great American collector Paul Barnes visited his studios and immediately bought sixty of Soutine's paintings. Soutine went on to produce landscapes, still-lifes, and portraits which are considered true masterpieces. Chaïm Soutine once horrified his neighbours by keeping an animal carcass in his studio so that he could paint (Carcass of Beef). The stench drove them to send for the police, whom Soutine promptly lectured on the relative importance of art over hygiene. In Montparnasse, he became friends with Amedeo Modigliani who painted his portrait in 1917. Obsessed by form and colour, often depressed and dissatisfied, Soutine destroyed many paintings during bouts of despair and only produced the majority of his works from 1920 to 1929. He seldom showed his works, apart during the important exhibition of Independent Art held in 1937 in Paris where he was at last hailed as a great painter. However, his good times were not to last after the invasion of France by German troops. As a Jew, Soutine had to escape from the French capital and hide in order to avoid arrest by the hands of the Gestapo. He constantly moved from one place to another and was sometimes forced to seek shelter in forests, sleeping outdoors. Suffering from a stomach ulcer and bleeding badly he had to leave his safe hiding place for Paris in order to undergo emergency surgery, which failed to save his life. On August 8, 1944, just two weeks before the French capital was freed by Allied forces, Chaim Soutine died of a perforated ulcer. Soutine was interred in Cimetière du Montparnasse, Paris, France. After his death his vivid colors and passionate handling of paint gained him recognition as one of the foremost Expressionist painters.
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- Monday, October 18, 2004 at 01:41:13 (EDT)
From; :[litvaksig] Expulsion of Jews in 1915 ----- Visit home page at http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak--------------- i am wondering if anybody can help me with researching my ancestors, who lived in kaunas. i think they lived in a small village. i dont have much information about them. my grandmother's  name was Beyla Leya Mortkhelevich. during WW1, in 1915, she and her five children were forced to leave the village, due to the war. she left her husband behind for reasons unknown to me. this family did not leave far from the railway line, and one night soldiers came and put them on the train to the Ukraine. i was wondering if anybody knows where i would be able to find a list of families who were forced to leave the city due to the war, or any other information relating to the explusion of jews from Litva. thanx, eugene kaplan. ------- It seems that, at least partially, the Russians kept lists of evacuated Jews (located at the historical archives of Vilna). You can find such detailed lists of Jews from the Suwalki Gubernia in the booklet: Galina Baranova, Jews Evicted from Suwalki Gubernia in the Summer of 1915, Landsmen Press, 1999. Ben-Tsion Klibansky---------------------- I've seen a number of postings regarding the expulsion of Jews from Lithuania in 1915 and their migration east at that time. How prevalent was this, and was it required in certain towns but not others? I know that my grandmother and her family remained in Rokiskis throughout the war. While my grandfather was fighting on the front, my grandmother worked as a nurse traveling on ambulances tending wounded soldiers, and ran an inn where German soldiers would sometimes eat. She said those she encountered were courteous and often helpful, unlike in World War II. Amanda Katz Jermyn ---------------------------- Based on everything I have read, including first-hand accounts by Jews who were forced to leave Lithuania in 1915, I do not believe lists of names were a requirement. Notices were posted in the town that Jews had to leave within 24 to 72 hours (depending on the town) and go East into the farthest parts of Russia. I am not aware that any list of names were required or recorded. In 1919, Lithuania became an independent country.  Many Jews returned from the Eastern part of Russia to Lithuania. Everyone, including Jews, had to apply for an internal passport within 30 days of their return. If they failed to do so, they were considered a foreigner and subject to expulsion.  Even though lists of those who left were not recorded, the internal passport applications were proof that they did return and the approximate date of return. In the near future, an announcement will be made on JewishGen about a new database containing data from thousands of internal passport applications between 1919-1940.  The database promises to give important, and exciting, information. Please do not ask me questions about it - please wait for the announcement. Howard Margol------------------------ There was a major expulsion of Jews from Lithuania in June 1915.  My father's family, in Kovno, ended up in Rostov, Russia and stayed there until 1921.  (If they had not returned to Kovno, the Holocaust would not have found them.) During research pertaining to my maternal grandfather who was born in 1882 in Rostov, (known as Rostov-on-Don), I learned that many of the Jewish population left Rostov before or during the time that the Germans arrived. During research pertaining to my maternal grandfather who was born in 1882 in Rostov, (known as Rostov-on-Don), I learned that many of the Jewish population left Rostov before or during the time that the Germans arrived. According to my second cousin, they went east to places such as Tashkent where they stayed for the duration of the German occupation.  This was clarified by a gentleman who is probably a descendant of my great grandfather's brother.  It would be helpful to look at a map of the area, the bloody Battle of Stalingrad, east of Rostov, is where the Germans were stopped in their advance.  My second cousin said that she was a young medical doctor treating the injured at the battle.  There are awful stories about what the Germans did to the remaining Jews who did not leave, including one M AMCHISLAVSKY who is documented as having been killed by them. Rostov-on-Don was outside the Pale of Settlement.  Around 1880 it was opened to Jews who could bring economic growth to the city and area.  My great grandparents moved there in 1881 from Chernigov Gubernia in the Ukraine. Meri-Jane, if your father's family stayed in Rostov and left to go east with these other Jews, it is likely that they would have survived.  The survivors were those who did travel east where they remained until the end of the war. Best wishes for success in your research. Linda Morzillo------------------------ My family also was from a small town in Lithuania.  It was called Shavlan or Siaulenai (Lithuanian Name).  My grandmother and her 4 children were put on a train and were shipped to Elkatrinaslav in Russia.  After the war they came back to their small village, Shavlan. E. Blecker------------------------- There was a major expulsion of Jews from Lithuania in June 1915.  My father's family, in Kovno, ended up in Rostov, Russia and stayed there until 1921.  (If they had not returned to Kovno, the Holocaust would not have found them.)  I would guess this is covered in histories of Lithuanian Jews.  You can also find week-to-week reports in English-language Jewish newspapers of the era, such as the *Jewish Chronicle* of London. Meri-Jane Rochelson ---------------------
http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak
- Wednesday, October 13, 2004 at 13:11:35 (EDT)
Lee Krasner Born  Oct 28 1908,  Brooklyn New York,  USA. Died  1984. (Lena)(Lenore) Lee Krasner, who married Pollock in 1944, was not celebrated at all during Pollock's lifetime -- which was cut short in 1956 by a fatal car crash due to driving while intoxicated. Yet it was she who actually started covering the canvas with a passionate flurry of marks. The originality and integrity of her vision and its great sense of internal cohesion is now beginning to be recognized. Lee Krasner learned slowly. She always did her homework, adored the teacher, and never forgot a thing. Everyone knew a girl like that back in fourth grade. It has made her easy to respect but difficult to like. One knows her, if at all, as Jackson Pollock's wife. However, it also made her Abstract Expressionism's great survivor. A retrospective in Brooklyn traces her furious independence. It shows that Krasner was able to reinvent her art again and again. In its final serenity, it became an act of rediscovery and release Verbal, matter-of-fact Krasner (1908-1984) was the daughter of Orthodox Jewish Russian immigrants, raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., and the tenements of the Lower East Side. Like many Jews of her generation, she rejected the old ways to become an American, specifically a New York Jewish intellectual committed to everything radical and modern. Pollock (1912-1956), conversely, was a taciturn, troubled, young man from Wyoming: alcoholic, manic-depressive, prone to frightening rages and swaggering boasts. They met when Krasner saw his work in a 1941 exhibition, charged up the stairs of his Greenwich Village apartment building and knocked on his door. "The fact that Lee was Jewish was part of the draw for Jackson," says actor-director-producer Harris, who bears an eerie resemblance to Pollock and is an Oscar nominee for best actor. "He found that exotic, provocative and mysterious."
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- Tuesday, October 12, 2004 at 20:42:48 (EDT)
Dear Eilat: I very much enjoy your web site. It is so informative. I recently saw the question by Michael Rosen about Aishiskin, and made contact with him. It turns out that we are distant cousins through the Eishyshok connection. I am wondering if you would have any information about Rabbi Moshe Kopelevitz of Eishyshok. He was probably born around 1810 or 1820. Rabbi Aishiskin married his granddaughter. Rabbi Kopelevitz had many children, including many daughters, and at least 3 sons - Mordechai Eliezer Szczyczynski, who was my great great grandfather, Rabbi Yisrael Leib Kopelevitz, whose daughter married Zvi Shimshi, and whose grandson is President Yitzhak Ben-Zvi, and Dov Ber Schreibman, who also had many daughters. My family has told me that my great great grandfather was a sofer and maybe Dov Ber Schreibman was also a sofer, given his name. Have you ever heard of Rabbi Kopelevitz? Do you know who I might be able to contact to get more information about him or his children? I would appreciate any help that you might be able to offer. Dave Berg timestorm1@hotmail.com
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- Tuesday, October 12, 2004 at 18:23:57 (EDT)
My family -- Edelman/Adelman/Ejdelman -- is from Horodok. My grandfather Yeshiah, his father Chaim Moshe and his father Meshulam Fayve. A family tree is posted somewhere on one of the old guestbooks. I am very curious as to the source of the new Ejdelman photos, and in particular, the one of Fayve. Any details that you have would be appreciated. Thanks ----- Scott Edelman (scottedelman@Mindspring.com) ------------------------------- Eidelmans in Grodek/ Horodok business directory from 1929; haberdashers; Ejdelman, H. Ejdelman, S. Ejdelman---- clothing materials D. Eidelman---Horse traders Ejdelman, G. ------------------------------------------------------------------ Eidelmans in 1850 revision list for Gorodok : EIDELMAN Afroim son of Nisen --- EIDELMAN Abram son of Faibish--- EIDELMAN Eilia son of Gilka --- EIDELMAN Mordukh son of Eilia-- EIDELMAN Iankel son of Eilia--- EIDELMAN Gilel (son of Eilia) Age: 33 son 315/94 EIDELMAN Khatskel (son of Eilia) died in 1848 son 315/94 EIDELMAN Iosel son of Leiba --- EIDELMAN Itska son of Leiba --- --------------------------------------------- EIDELMAN Lipka son of Iankel - Abram (son of Iankel) Age: 33 son 310/49 Sifra (daughter of Eilia) wife of Abram age; 30 310/49 ----------------- Srol (son of Meier) Head of Household Age; 38 317/121 Temka (daughter of; Mordukh) wife of Srol Age; 35 317/121 Minia (daughter of Srol) Age; 15 317/121 Abram (son of Meier) Age; 34 brother 317/121 Goda (daughter of; Mordukh) wife of Abram Faibish (son of ; Meier) Age; 31 (if lived- died that year) brother 317/121 Merka (daughter of Shmerka ) Age 19, wife of Faibish 317/121 ------------- Dovid (son of ;Mordukh) Age; 40 Head of Household 312/ 63 Pesia (daughter of Srol) Wife of Dovid age 38 Khaim (son of Dovid ) Age; 25 312/ 63 Ginda (daughter of Gilka), wife of Khaim age: 22- Daughter-in-law of Dovid Mordukh --------- Faibish (son of Gershon) Age; 48 Head of Household 316/109 Khana (daughter of Evna ) Faibish' wife age 35 316/109 Minia (daughter of Faibish) Age 6 316/109 ---------------- Gerts (son of Meier) Age; 50 Head of Household 313/79 Itka (daughter of Gerts) age 20 313/79 Movsha (son of Gerts) age 26 313/79 Shmaia (son of Gerts) age 33 313/79 Rokha (daughter of Dovid) wife of Shmaia age; 20 Rivka (daughter of Dovid) wife age 46 313/76 --------------------------
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- Monday, October 11, 2004 at 13:39:21 (EDT)
Message: where did you get the ejdelman pictures on the horodok website. Who are they? Fajwe Ejdelman and Jakob Ejdelman were partisans during the war.
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/horodok/h_pix/093004_7_b.gif
- Saturday, October 09, 2004 at 23:09:33 (EDT)
Message: I'm Kasia wirkowicz, My grandfather Romuald wirkowicz left Dunilowicze after war. Now he lives in milicz, Poland. He wrote a few years ago his war years diary. I readed this diary and I think, that the holocaust period was most terrifying! swirek123@wp.pl (Kasia)
Kasia wirkowicz
Poland - Tuesday, October 05, 2004 at 13:12:04 (EDT)
Searching for any information Morris Hurowitz born in Pasvalys Lithuania in 1885. Immigrated to Baltimore in 1894 with mother Serla and 3 sisters and 1 brother according to the records from Ellis Island. Moved to Chicago with wife. Last contact no address in the mid 50's. Does anyone know anything? Please reply privately to email address. Joe Winston
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- Tuesday, October 05, 2004 at 13:02:22 (EDT)
Harnessing the Internet in Holocaust search ---- By Yuval Dror ---- "A few years before his death, my father told me he is convinced that his children from his first marriage perished in the Holocaust but he did not know this for sure," says Zvi Schwartzman, 56, who specializes in Internet technologies Recently, Schwartzman has been working with the Tel Aviv-based Engineering College on a unique project that will have Israeli high school pupils trying to find lost relatives of Holocaust survivors through blogs - on-line diaries - on the Google search engine. The students will post details about the survivors on the blogs and employ a technique that Google has introduced - automatic connections between blogs that have the same topics of interest. "We have a small window of opportunity. If there are enough blogs on the Internet, the ties between the survivors can be found," Schwartzman says. There are about 300,000 survivors still living, some 80,000 of them in Israel, according to the Yad Vashem memorial authority. Most of the projects involving Holocaust survivors, especially that of film producer Steven Spielberg, have as their aim the documenting of survivors' testimonies. Schwartzman decided the Internet had the capability of helping trace relatives. "Google is interested in creating community ties between the blog writers. With this in mind, it has added a special field of `interests,' where the writers of diaries note what their fields of interest are," Schwartzman explains. "Every three weeks, the Google search engine searches all the blogs and automatically adds connections between the various diaries whose writers say they have similar interests. In this way, a blog whose writer is interested in 16th-century books will get a connection to another blog in Google whose writer has the same interest. This is the perfect attribute for tracking family members." Schwartzman linked up with the college and together they turned to a number of schools with the suggestion that 11th graders would contact Holocaust survivors - after Holocaust organizations check that they are, indeed, interested in being interviewed. The pupil will interview the survivor and write down his exact details: full name, birth date, place of residence, names of relatives, etc. Then the pupils will post a blog devoted to the survivor with all these details. The pupils will be instructed on how to do so in such a way that Google will easily be able to track the blog. Certain key words will be typed into a special field. Later the pupils will be asked to search other databases, like that of Yad Vashem, to get additional facts about the survivor. These will be added to the blog. Schwartzman hopes that connections will therefore be made between the blogs of different survivors posted by other pupils. In addition, people who read the blogs will be able to write comments. The pupil who is in charge of the survivor's blog will get an e-mail message when there is a new connection. Schwartzman says a pilot project will begin at two schools at the start of the coming academic year - Katznelson in Kfar Saba and Mossinson in Hod Hasharon. Schwartzman and the college, which is providing the professional backing, have also contacted senior citizens' homes where many of the residents are connected to the Web. "They can decide whether to post their own blog or to get help from a pupil," he says. They have also asked the Education Ministry to make the project part of the curriculum so that the number of blogs can increase. "Today's pupils are not involved much with the Holocaust and this is one of the last opportunities for them to have a personal contact with a survivor," Schwartzman says. The Polish Embassy has been contacted with a view to starting a similar program in Poland. "Israeli and Polish pupils can cooperate. The Polish pupils can provide additional information. Also, the Poles lost relatives in the war and perhaps this will help them find them," he says. The pupils will receive booster lessons in English, history and geography to assist them with writing the blogs, as well as psychological counseling to help them cope with the emotion-laden meetings with the survivors. They will also participate in a creative-writing workshop that will help them compose the blogs.
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- Saturday, October 02, 2004 at 14:12:46 (EDT)
I called Alexander Bogen. His father was Zvi Katzenbogen and his mother was Miryam nee Ravinzki. Miryam was the daughter of rabbi Tuvia Ravizki of Wolkovisk (now in Belarus). He had a sister; Golda (Ula). Zvi Katzenbogen served in the Russian army during the First World War and was killed by the Germans in combat when Alexander was only one year old. (1917). Alexanders mother (Miryam) was a physician. She had a clinic in Vilna and was married to Rabinovitz. From 1921- 1939 Vilna was under Polish rule. Alexander said that he never heard any one speaking Lithuania during his childhood. He mostly heard; Polish, Yiddish and some Belorussian in the streets of Vilna. When he visited Vilna/ Vilnius recently he was amazed, he realized how prevalent and predominant was the Lithuanian language and culture in Vilnius. During the middle and late 1930s Poland was swept by a wave of anti-Semitism. C 1937 Miryam was forced to close her clinic. She moved to a shtetl by the name of Svislutz (sp? today in Belarus) Miryam Rabinovitz and her husband opened a clinic there. They perished in Svitzlutz after the German took the area over from the Soviet Union (June of 1941). Alexanders sister; Golda/ Ula studied in the Politechnikum. When the Germans took the area she escaped deep into the Soviet Union. She survived the war in the eastern part of the Soviet Union and came to Israel after the war. Alexander married Rachel (Rela) nee Shachor before the war. Rachel also grew up in Vilna. She had one brother who immigrated to Brazil before the war. Her parents were Dov and Sara Shachor. Shortly after the Jews of Vilna were put in the ghetto Dov shachor was kidnapped by the Germans during one of the many raids they conducted. He was sent to the camps in Estonia and perished. During the Soviet rule Rachel was appointed as a teacher in the high school in Svencian. Alexander and Rachel were in the Svencian ghetto during the first months of the war (summer of 1941) Later they were sent to the Vilna ghetto. Alexander escaped and after he returned in order to bring some resistance fighters from the Vilna ghetto to the forest- he also took his wife and his mother in law to the forest. Sometimes later Alexander was a leader of a Jewish unit and amongst his ranks was Zalman Uri Gurevitz (first cousin of my mother). Sara Shachor spent some the war years in the zimlanka of Zalman Uris father; Natan Gurevitz (brother of my grandfather; Meir Gurevitz) Sara survived the war and came to Israel with her daughter and son in law in 1951.---------------Eilat
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- Wednesday, September 29, 2004 at 16:50:04 (EDT)
AIMERAIS CONNAITRE MES ANCETRES DU NOM DE BINIAS. SI L'on pouvait me renseigner sur les différentes photos de ce site. Merci d'avance.   Fabien BINIAS-----v.mauch@wanadoo------------------------- WOULD LIKE TO KNOW MY ANCESTORS OF THE NAME OF BINIAS. IF L'on could inform me about the various photographs of this site. Thank you d'avance. Fabien BINIAS
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- Tuesday, September 28, 2004 at 13:33:41 (EDT)
September 27, 2004 I called artist Alexander Bogen/ Katzenbogen in Israel and told him about my translation of his chapter "The Onset of the Partisan Units in the Forest of Naroch" From With Proud Bearing, 1939-1945: Chapters in the History of Jewish Fighting in the Naroch Forests Edited by Moshe Kalcheim. Alexander gave ne some phone numbers for other partisans; Shutan, and Chana Shafran (her daughter; Bela) He asked me to include some text and pictures from the book "Revolt" Revolt ///Author Bogen, Alexander Publication Name/ Beit Lohamei Haghetaot Year; 1989 Language English Hebrew Description 4`, unnumbered pages, hardcover, dust jacket, ill., in good++ condition Price $115.00 Cat. Number Kg 25 42 From the Internet; "---In addition to all his other obligations and tasks at the time, Alexander Bogen, a fighter and partisan commander, did not forget that he was an artist, and documented and drew his partisan comrades. During World War II, Bogen was the commander of a partisan brigade in the Naroch forest in Belorus and infiltrated into the Vilna ghetto at the most difficult period, when many of the public activists were in despair over the certain destruction In the framework of the F.PO. (United Partisan Organization), he organized groups of Jewish youth and led them to the forest, and the Nekama (Vengeance) partisan brigade, which afterwards became famous for its fighting. The artist was born in Vilna (Vilnius) in 1916, to the Katzenbogen family, who were doctors, and he was the grandson of Rabbi Tuvia of Wolkowisk. While still a youth, Bogen studies painting and sculpture at the faculty of Art in the University of Vilna, and when the war was over he returned to his studies there. In 1947 he completed his studies magna cum laude, was appointed a professor in the advanced school of Art in Lodz, and became famous in Poland as an artist and sculpture, set designer and book illustrator. In 1951 he immigrated to Israel"---Dr. Pnina Rosenberg, Curator From the catalogue, the Ghetto Fighters House, 2001) In the Ghetto Fighters House Museum art collection, there are many works by the artist Alexander Bogen, which were produced during World War II and immediately thereafter (1943-1949). This exhibition focuses on Alexander Bogens work in Israel, which, fifty years after the events, is ichonographically connected to the work done during the Holocaust period. Bogens drawings, especially those that survived from the fighting of the partisans in the forests, are a first-hand testimony. He creates a gallery of characters, of types, of situations, of a people fighting for its life, which constitute the basis of the myth of the revolt and the renascence. The exhibition presents drawings for poems by two Yiddish poets, Gebirtig and Sutzkever. Bogens drawings that accompany the poems of Gebirtig have been published before (1997), but the drawings for Sutzkevers poems were done just now, or, more accurately, have been collected and linked to the poems for this exhibition. The two groups of poems are representative of Bogens works, some of which were done in the past five years, but in terms of theme, the drawings are connected with the period of the Holocaust and the Revolt, and thus constitute a kind of closing of a circle in his oeuvre. The exhibition thus presents the more graphic aspect of Bogens art - works that accompany literary texts in Yiddish, poems and prose - which constitutes one of the two main axes in his oeuvre.     Curator of the exhibition: Sorin Heller Alexander Bogen Attack by Partisan Cavalry no date  enlarge  choose  © Beit Lohamei Haghetaot Pencil on grey paper, 46.7 x 66.7 cmSigned, lower right: A Bogen© Beit Lohamei Haghetaot, Museum Number 741. Donated by the artist Portrait of Sidiakin, a Partisan Commander Narocz Forest 10 February 1944 Pencil on paper, 28.2 x 20.2 cm Inscribed (in Russian), upper right: Commisar of the Tsiapaiev unit of the Varoshilov brigade, N.T. Sidiakin. Signed and dated, lower right: Kazenbogen, 10.II.44 © Beit Lohamei Haghetaot, Museum Number 838. Donated by the artist Alexander Bogen (1916- ) Group of Partisans in the Forest Narocz Forests 1943  enlarge  choose  © Beit Lohamei Haghetaot Charcoal on paper, 18 x 25 cmSigned (in Cyrillic letters) and dated, on reverse, lower right: A. Bogen, 43, Narocz© Beit Lohamei Haghetaot, Museum Number 599. Donated by the artist Alexander Bogen (1916- ) Partisan Eating Lithuania 1943  enlarge  choose  © Beit Lohamei Haghetaot Charcoal on paper, 48 x 34.5Signed and dated, lower right: A. Bogen, 43© Beit Lohamei Haghetaot, Museum Number 881. Donated by the artist Portrait of Vice Commander Osenyenko Wearing Russian Fur Hat and a Medal Lithuania 3 January 1944  enlarge  choose  © Beit Lohamei Haghetaot Purple ink on paper, 24.6 x 16.8 cmInscribed (in Russian), upper part: Vice Commander of the patrol unit, of the Varoschilov brigade, Osenyenko. Signed (in Cyrillic letters) and dated, lower center: Kazenbogen, 3.I.44© Beit Lohamei Haghetaot, Museum Number 1437. Donated by the artist Alexander Bogen (1916- ) Two Partisans Narocz Forests 1943  enlarge  choose  © Beit Lohamei Haghetaot Pencil on paper, 65 x 50 cmSigned and dated, lower right: A. Bogen, 43© Beit Lohamei Haghetaot, Museum Number 746. Donated by the artist Youth Vilna 1943  enlarge  choose  © Beit Lohamei Haghetaot Charcoal on paper, 27 x 20 cmSigned (in Cyrillic letters) and dated, lower right: Bogen, 1943, Vilnius© Beit Lohamei Haghetaot, Museum Number 594. Donated by the artist Bogen donated some of his works from the war period to the art collection of Beit Lohamei Haghetaot (the Ghetto Fighters' House Museum). He has spoken about the nature of his war works and the reasons he produced them:We saw forsaken children. We saw people being taken for slaughter. I could not let my pencil fall. An artist doomed to death recording and so preserving those doomed to death. Was this a purely aesthetic purpose? Was I at ease with my conscience when I took a bereft mother, a forsaken little girl or a dying old man as my models? As a partisan I recorded in telegram style, so to say, while on my way to some action, leaning over my rifle or standing tensely in ambush. I sketched the forest, my brothers-in-arms, the battle itself. There was no table. There were no paints. There was no paper. I found packing paper. I burnt dry branches and prepared charcoal for my sketches.A partisan newspaper was published by the Brigade. I made woodcuts with my pen-knife and prepared them for the mobile press. Wherever I found myself I collected scraps of paper and went on sketching.I asked myself why I was drawing, when I was fighting day and night. This is something similar to biological continuity. Every man, every people, is interested to continue his people, his family, to bring his creative children for the future - to leave this one thing. Another motivation was to bring information to the so-named free world about the actions, the cruel, cruel actions of the Germans - some documentation. To tell about this to a world that was uninformed - To be creative in the situation of the Holocaust, this is also a protest. Each man when he is standing face to face with cruel danger, with death, reacts in his way. The artist reacts with his means. This is his protest! This is my means! He reacts in an artistic way. This is his weapon. He must leave his mark as a mensch on mankind. This, it shows that the Germans could not break his spirit.[1] f The Pen and the Sword: Jewish Artist and Partisan, Alexander Bogen  The Ubermensch in the pose typical of the Master RaceOil crayon on paperGift of the artist,1943   The first major look at the complex subject of Jewish efforts to fight back against the Nazis and their collaborators in Eastern Europe. Told by partisans themselves, without a narrator, and filmed in Lithuania, Poland and Israel, the film uses black and white imagery of the partisan forest hideouts, rare archival footage, historical photographs and original artwork by partisan fighter Alexander Bogen to document this little known history. Surviving partisans tell of the circumstances that enabled them to make a decision that not every Jew could - the decision to fight back.           Alexander Bogen (b. 1916), A Fighters Meal, 1943, pencil on paper The Pen and the Sword  Jewish Artist and Partisan, Alexander Bogenby Shachar Leven After infiltrating the Vilna ghetto on a precarious rescue mission only days before its final liquidation, Alexander BogenJewish artist and partisanwas plagued by a reverberating question: What motivates someone at the precipice of death to engage in artistic creation?An artist and a native of Vilna, Bogen neither forsook his artistry nor ceased sketching the people, places, and events he encountered following the Nazi occupation of Lithuania. However, it was only after infiltrating the ghetto in September 1943 that he began considering the wartime function of innovation: to transform pen into sword, transcend the finite parameters of time and space, and retain a spark of humanity in the face of despair. These artistic objectives crystallized in his mind through encounters with ghetto residents, former friends, and colleagues: the fellow-artist who stood by his easelhalf-naked and starvingyet oblivious to his condition having captured the elusive smile of his model on canvas; the all-around genius who wandered the streets past curfew heedless of his personal fate having solved an elaborate mathematics equation; the young orphan abandoned on a street corner who Bogenan armed partisancould not save, so sketched out of helplessness, passivity, and the inability to offer up salvation.Alexander Bogen (b.1916), A Jewish Partisan in the Voroshilov Brigade, 1943, Pencil on paper. Donated by the artist Aside from reinforcing his personal devotion to art, Bogens mission in the ghetto helped facilitate the successful rescue of members of the United Partisan Organization (FPÖ)a Jewish underground movement active in the ghetto. After breaching the ghetto walls armed with a pistol and two hand grenades, Bogenalong with two fellow partisansreached FPÖ head, Abba Kovners headquarters. Bogen presented him with a letter from Fyodor Markov, commander of the partisan division in Belarussias Narocz Forest.From the beginning, Kovners intention had been to launch a full-scale armed revolt in the ghetto to sanctify Gods name and foster pride in the Jews even in their moment of defeat, recalls Bogen. It was a noble conception, but not practical in my opinion. We couldnt fight the Nazis in the narrow alleyways of the ghetto with our few, primitive weapons. We would have zero chance.With the end in sight, Kovner did not abandon his plans for revolt, however acceded to the partisans request to smuggle ghetto residents (including members of the FPÖ) to the forests.One hundred and fifty Jewish underground members were assembled and divided into five units which Bogen helped train: I distributed primitive weapons and copies of my map of the forest. I taught them how to prepare for and fight the enemy, find food, read a compass, where to hide, and where and when to walkall the tactical information one needs to become a partisan, says Bogen. He assumed command of one the units, which included his wife, Rachel, and his mother-in-law. In the late night hours he helped secure the groups escape from the ghetto; a few days later, all five units arrived safely in the forests where they joined the non-Jewish partisan ranks.With Markovs permission, Bogen retained command of his 30-person unit, which became the only all-Jewish partisan brigadeNekama (Vengeance). The unit achieved many successes and was responsible for missions such as: mining railroad tracks and derailing trains, sabotaging German weapons banks and food rations that were being sent to the front, and disseminating information about the mass extermination and active resistance in the nearby ghettos, villages, and towns.Alexander Bogen (b.1916), A Partisan on Alert, 1943, charcoal on paper Partisan life was stark and grueling. Aside from risky reconnaissance missions and clashes with the enemy, fighters suffered from exposure to the elements, insufficient food, and illness. For Jewish partisans the conditions were even more dire: They had to face the residual tragedy, mental torment, longing, and worry about the fate of loved ones left behind in the ghetto, notes Bogen, as well as antisemitic treatment from non-Jewish partisans. Jewish partisansespecially those who served in mixed units with Russians, Letts, and Belarussiansalways had to prove they were willing to volunteer first for missions and risk the most, says Bogen. They were often sent poorly armed on hopeless operations that had little chance of success.Even the Nekama Unit became problematic to the Soviet partisan leadership due to its all-Jewish character, despite its many achievements. The unit was disbanded after several months and Bogen (after a few other appointments in mixed units) was commissioned, alongside another partisan, to document partisan activities.Bogen captured his brothers-in-arms through the medium of art, sketching scenes of partisan battle, rest, ambush, dress, and diversion on random scraps of paper using charcoal made from burnt branches. I would try to record the typical situations that we would encountera unit returning from its operation its members sitting around a bonfire, playing cards, drinking Vodka, recounting the tales of what befell them says Bogen. In battle, at partisan headquarters I would pull out my paper and sketch these things as they were happening, as a reaction to the events taking place.Ultimately, when I asked myself why I was drawing, when I was fighting day and night [I realized that it was] something similar to biological continuity. Every man, every people wishes to leave this one thing To be creative during the Holocaust was also a protest. Each man when standing face to face with cruel danger, with death, reacts in his own way. The artist reacts in an artistic way. This is his weaponThis is what shows that the Germans could not break his spirit. Alexander Bogen has recently donated 37 of his works created during his days as a partisan to Yad Vashems Art Museum. Several of these pieces will be exhibited in Yad Vashems new Holocaust History Museum in the section dedicated to Jewish fighting. Related Links:Online Exhibition: The Pen and the SwordCopyright ©2004 Yad Vashem The Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Authority
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- Monday, September 27, 2004 at 21:52:55 (EDT)
 rkoltun@peoplepc.com wrote; I  read  in  the book  HEROISM  AND  BRAVERY  by  ALEX  FAITELSON  page  327:             DR LEVITAN  agreed  to  go the  forest  only on the  condition  that  he  would  be  allowed  to  take  his wife  and  children  with him. A K O  promised  to  help  him.  afterwards  when  the ghetto was liqudated and the remaining Jews were taken to camps he  commited suicide  together  with  his  family  by swalowing  poison. There  must  be  some  mistake.  WHERE?     regards. Dear rkoltun@peoplepc.com..... My husbands' grandparents' were another Levitan family. They knew the Dr. Levitan you wrote about. His father (Dr. Ytzhak Levitan) was a well known man in the Kovno community. Dr. Ytzhak Levitan was expelled to Siberia before the war - he survived but his son and the rest of the family perished in Kovno. My husbands' father (Ruven) and his parents (his mother Ada- Yetta was a Doctor and his father Nachum Levitan an attorney) escaped from the ghetto and survived- Ada and Nachum had a girl in the Ghetto and they named her Yonina- some months before they escaped they gave the girl to a Lithuanian woman in order to save her, a Lithuanian neighbor told the Germans that the woman has a Jewish baby and the woman was arrested for a short time and the baby was taken to prison. My father in law met a woman who remembered seeing his sister Yonina three days before the Soviets liberated Kovno - Yonina was by then two years old-she was the last to see her-they found no trace of her after the war. Eilat
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- Sunday, September 26, 2004 at 03:33:52 (EDT)
I attached an "updated"  list of the Krasne  families  thanks  to the  receipt of the  Vaad Hayeshivot which  was sent  by Mr. Alperovitch?  (jialpert) Please  delete the previous list which I sent .   The story about harav Tcherny isn't correct. He died a short time before the  nazis came. The widow & the children  went to her parents a little shtetel in Lithuania.   In Krasne there were 3 shuls; the alte shull, the neue shull and a shtibel. The nusach of the tefilot  was chasidic even there  were a minority of MITNAGDIM,  my father too.The list of the donations has nothing to do with who to what shull belongs.            shalom,  toda  raba  & chag sameach Arie Shevach 
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- Wednesday, September 22, 2004 at 23:53:18 (EDT)
From: Michael Rosen Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2004 23:27:09 -0700 > Subject: questions about the name Aishiskin > To: eilat.gordinlevitan@gmail.com-- I am doing family research on the Aishiskin name. This was my grandfather's last name. I am trying to trace family history. I saw this name on your website, which is a most amazing work.  What can you tell me about that name? thanks. Mike Rosen---- From: Eilat Gordin Levitan To: Michael Rosen Subject: Re: questions about the name aishiskin > > > > Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 08:27:51 -0700 Dear Mike, I think that the name originated in the shtetl Eishyshock/ Eisiskes, about 30 miles from Vilna, Lithuania. My relatives came from that area. Professor Yaffa Eliach set up in the Museum (Holocaust Museum in Washington DC)  hundreds of pictures of Eishyshok families. Professor Eliach has written a wonderful book on Eishyshok called "There Once was a Town" a 900 year history of the Jews of Eishyshok.  A 90-minute TV documentary on the book was  shown on PBS. The video is narrated by Ed Asner, whose family came from one of the small 'suburbs' of Eishyshok.. http://64.233.161.104/custom?q=cache:YI6oz2bv6cQJ:www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/eis-trip.htm+Eishyshok&hl;=en&ie;=UTF-8 Could I post some pictures of your family members on the site? > Thanks, Eilat -------------------------- On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 20:17:27 +0000, Michael Rosen To: Michael Rosen some information I found - I will write more later.... > Title; Devar Yechezkel  Author; Rabbi Yechezkel > > > Aishiskin       Detroit MI      Publish date;1921 > > > (your grandfather?) >      Ezkail Aishiskin         (in Hebrew Yechezkel) B: abt > 1867 > > - Poland from > > > 1921- 1939 the Vilna area was part of Poland) He was 63 in 1930. > > > R: 1930 - Detroit, Wayne, Michigan      Census. lived with the Levine > > > family (his son in law) came to the country in 1904 widow was first > > > married at age 22 . Rabbi/ Minister in Beth David. > > > son in law; > > > Isaac Levine was 43 years old in 1930. He paid rent. Was born in what is in 1930; Poland (from 1921- 1939 the Vilna area was part of Poland) > > > came to the country in 1910. married at age 25 Kosher produce inspector. > > > his wife was Katie, age 39. came to the country in 1906 married at age 21 Daughter; Sarah, age 14 > > >        Peter C Aishiskin       B: abt 1896 - Russia > > > R: 1930 - Detroit, Wayne, Michigan      Census > > > 1930 United States F... > > >        Jennie Aishiskin        B: abt 1900 > > > R: 1930 - Detroit, Wayne, Michigan      Census > > > 1930 United States F... > > >        Ann S Aishiskin B: abt 1926 > > > R: 1930 - Detroit, Wayne, Michigan      Census > > > 1930 United States F... > > >        Miriam Aishiskin        B: abt 1929 > > > R: 1930 - Detroit, Wayne, Michigan      Census > > > 1930 United States F... > > >        Ezkail Aishiskin        B: abt 1867 - Poland (your grandfather?) > > > R: 1930 - Detroit, Wayne, Michigan      Census > > > 1930 United States F... > > >        Rabbi E Aishiskin       B: abt 1868 > > > R: 1910 - 5-WD DETROIT, WAYNE, Michigan Census > > > 1910 United States F... > > >        Jennie G AISHISKIN      B: 25 Dec 1899 > > > D: 28 Jan 1990 - Detroit, Wayne, Michigan > > > R: Oak Park, Oakland, Michigan  Birth, Marriage, & Death > > > Michigan Deaths, 197... > > >        Jennie G. Aishiskin     B: 25 Dec 1899 > > > D: 28 Jan 1990 - 48237, Oak Park, Oakland, Michigan, United States of > > > America > > > O: Michigan     Birth, Marriage, & Death > > > Social Security Deat... > > >        Peter Aishiskin B: 17 Jul 1894 > > > D: Jul 1965 - 48221, Detroit, Wayne, Michigan, United States of America > > > O: Michigan     Birth, Marriage, & Death > > > Social Security Deat... > > >        FRANK J AISHISKIN       R: 48237-2502, OAK PARK, MI > > Directories > > > 2000 Phone and Addre... > > >        JENNIE G AISHISKIN      R: 48237, DETROIT, MI   Directories > > > 1994 Phone and Addre> > On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 01:46:50 +0000, Michael Rosen Thanks for your help thus far! On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 01:14:11 +0000, Michael Rosen wrote: > > > > > > my mother is miriam. how did you find all of that so fast?????? > > > > > > Peter was my grandfather, the rabbi was my great grandfather. > > > Sat, 18 Sep 2004 Eilat Gordin Levitan eilat.gordinlevitan@gmail.com wrote From Ancestry.com      Peter C Aishiskin       B: abt 1896 - Russia (Prior to 1921 the area of Vilna was part of the Russian empire) R: 1930 - Detroit, Wayne, Michigan      Census rent $50 married at age 27 came to the country in 1912 owner of a drug store. 1930 United States F...      Jennie Aishiskin        B: abt 1900 in Michigan to Russian parents R: 1930 - Detroit, Wayne, Michigan      Census married at age 23 1930 United States F...        Ann S Aishiskin B: abt 1926 R: 1930 - Detroit, Wayne, Michigan      Census 1930 United States F...        Miriam Aishiskin        B: abt 1929 R: 1930 - Detroit, Wayne, Michigan      Census 1930 United States F... The only living AISHISKIN in the U.S; Name    Age     Street Address  City    State   Zip     Phone FRANK J AISHISKIN age;       70 > >   STRATFORD ST      OAK PARK        MI      48237   (248) On Tue, 21 Sep 2004 Michael Rosen <miker2001@---wrote: I just got the book 'There was Once a World' in the mail and my grandparents are pictured in the book!  My mother mentioned it to me, but I had not seen it before. On Tue, 21 Sep 2004 Eilat Gordin Levitan <eilat.gordinlevitan@gmail.com wrote: I see the picture on page 553- it is great! I will post it on the site in a few days- Also your great grandfathers' book is a source (page 754)  Eilat that would be great. make sure you let me know when it is up, so I can tell family members.  Thanks. I find this all very interesting and your website is fantastic! Michael Rosen 
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- Wednesday, September 22, 2004 at 15:40:22 (EDT)
WE ARE GRANDPARENTS!!!!!! EILAT AND ITAMAR (Gonen) HAD A BABY BOY LAST NIGHT , SEPTEMBER 19th. DETAILS TO FOLLOW....................... LOVE OSNAT (daughter of Yitzhak Chait) AND BENNY
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- Sunday, September 19, 2004 at 11:29:19 (EDT)
The Story of Bomke Boyarsky/ Bojarski Bomka Boyarsky was the second commander of the Otriad (Battalion) Nekama/ Mest. He was a young man, around 21 years old (born in 1921), a native of Dniepopetrovsk. In 1941, he visited Grodno and never had a chance to return to his hometown. From Grodno, he escaped to Vilna, where he served for a while as a policeman. Together with the group of Moshe Shutan, he escaped and reached the Naroch forest. Since he was a vostochnik (a person born in the eastern part of the area which was part of the Soviet Union prior to 1939), he quickly gained the trust of the head of the brigade. Since he became friends with them, they appointed him as head of the Otriad Nekama. When Nekama was dissolved, Bumka became commander of the scouting otriad by the name of Kalinin. Bomka was of average height, with wide, thick shoulders. He was very warm, with a good sense of humor, and very brave. His face always had a huge and very friendly smile. The only negative thing I can think of to say about him is that he was at times impatient. In his actions, he surprised his Belorussian and Soviet friends and was a source of pride for the Jews. One time he was sent, together with two other scouts, on a sabotage mission. The mission was successful, but they encountered Germans on the way back. The youngest among them - a twenty-six-year-old Jew - fell immediately. Bumka was badly wounded in the stomach and was taken to the base. He suffered from terrible pains for a long time; but when he had recovered somewhat, the brigade assigned him to a non-combat job. He refused to take it and said he had to return to combat and insisted that he wanted to be the commander of the scouts, as he had been before. As time passed, he recovered, many of his skills returned, and he took part in many combat activities against the Nazi enemy. At the beginning of winter 1943, the commander of the camp I traveled to was a very nice person and did not show any anti-Semitism. I walked around the barracks and looked for interesting people to draw. I encountered a Tatar who was very interesting looking. He was of the highest military rank, of strong stature, good-looking, and had a clearly Oriental facial structure. While I was drawing this man, the head of the Otriad - a Ukranian man who had only recently escaped from a POW camp and joined the partisans - entered the room. When he saw my drawing, he approached the Tatar man and slapped his face. Then he came to me, and tore up my paper. Both the Tatar and I were in shock. I drew my gun and pointed it at him. When he saw my weapon, he walked away. I entered the headquarters to complain to the supreme commander of the Otriad, Laskov, about the Ukrainian commander. I showed him the license I had received from Markov stating that I should interview and sketch resistance fighters. Laskov was very uncomfortable, saying that he didn't know the Ukrainian well and that he was new in his division and we must investigate his past. While we were talking, a partisan arrived and said, "Comrade commander, the Germans are coming!" We listened and could hear shots from afar. The commander immediately ordered Bumka to find where the enemy was. Bumka Boyarsky jumped on his white horse and disappeared like a stone in the depths of a forest. He was followed by three of his scouts - Kim, Leib Khadash, and Vaska. They arrived at the nearest village and asked if there were any Germans. Somehow the answers given by the villagers didn't ring true to them; and so they continued scouting, hoping to find the enemy. When they arrived at a special clearing in the forest, someone started shooting. It turned out to be someone from the Belorussian police. Bumka fell first and was badly wounded. He shot at them until [he had expended] his last bullet and then fell dead. Vaska, also, was mortally wounded. Kim was very badly wounded, and Leib Chadash carried the wounded Kim on his back while bullets were flying all around. They arrived at the forest, but then Kim said to him, "Put me down here. I am dying." When the Germans reached Bumka, they recognized him as Bumka - a partisan renowned for his bravery - so they took out a bayonet and gouged out his eyes. The shots continued and the whole division awaited their return, but they did not come back. So all the fighters jumped on sleighs that were harnessed to horses and hurried in the direction of the shooting. A few other divisions arrived and found the bodies that were in the clearing. We received an order to come near the lake and bunker ourselves there, opening fire on the enemy. The last soldiers were able to cross the frozen lake, and the Germans retreated. In the evening, the whole division stood at attention and Commando Laskov made a speech about Bumka, Kim, and Vaska, who fell as heroes defending the Soviet nation. pp. 175-205 from the partisans site; Bomke Bojarski Country Of Birth Soviet Union City Of Birth Dniepropetrovsk Date Of Birth 1921 Gender Male Holocaust Period Framework of Combat Partisans Country of Combat Belorussia Area of Combat Narotsh Forest Unit Battalion Nekama (Mest) Date Of Death 1944
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- Saturday, September 18, 2004 at 03:33:08 (EDT)
Dear All, My cousin (Yankel Lopiansky) who resides today in Slabodka happens to be now in Israel, so I called him to clarify everything. He said as follows: There were four cemetaries in the Kovno area. The "greener barg" ("Green hill") cemetary, one in Panemuna, one in Slabodka, and one in Aleksot. There was also a new cemetary duing WW II called the "ghetto cemetary". The only decently kept and functioning cemetary today is in Aleksot. Rabbi Elchonon Spector and his son were moved there, and the last Kovnor Rov, Rav Schapiro is buried there, amongst others. The ghetto cemetary was destroyed. Also the Slabodko cemetary was destroyed (in 1991). The Panemuma cemetary has only a few tombstones left and is in disarray. Likewise the "greener barg" cemetary. Wishing everyone a happy and healthy New Year, Aryeh Lopiansky Jerusalem
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- Wednesday, September 15, 2004 at 23:13:49 (EDT)
JOHN PALEY of Radoszkowice---------------------   By : Joseph Jacobs   Frederick T. Haneman   American journalist; born Feb. 6, 1871, at Radoszkowice, government of Wilna, Russia. After receiving the usual education, he attended the Talmudical colleges of Minsk, Volosin, and Libau. In 1889 he emigrated to New York,where he became editor of "Der Volksadvokat." In 1891 he removed to Philadelphia, became connected there with the "Jüdische Presse," and, in 1892, with the "Volkswächter" (as editor and publisher). Returning to New York, he has been, since 1893, editor of the "Jüdisches Tageblatt" and of the "Jüdische Gazetten," which he has made the most widely circulated Jewish paper in the world. Paley is the author of: "The Russian Nihilist" and "Life in New York" (dramas); "Die Schwarze Chevrah"; "Uriel Acosta"; "Mysteries of the East Side"; "The Erev Rav"; "Yichus und Verbrechen"; "Das Leben in New York"; etc. Bibliography: American Jewish Year Book, 5665 (1904-5) Died in New York in 1907
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- Wednesday, September 15, 2004 at 22:56:21 (EDT)
Has anyone every heard of SOSLA?  My GGF  had this listed as his hometown on his Declaration.  The only  reference I can find is from "The Sandler family from Dolhinov from Hertzel  Gitelson' writings" at  http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/dolhinov/d_pages/d_stories_sandler.html where  the quote is: "At one point he became a Prisoner of war of the Germans  and when they retreated from Lithuania at the end of the war he was left there  in the shtetl Sosla." Is there another name for this Shtetl? Ross  Weintraub Searching for: GREENFIELD, SIMON /  ZIMANSKY, WINSBERG in MARIJAMPOLE; and LAZARUS and  LEVINE in KAUNAS / KOVNO / VILIJAMPOLE / SLABODKE  Ross Weintraub asked whether there is another name for the shtetl Sosla (in Lithuania). (September 14 LitvakSIG digest). This response is an educated guess. I ran across a reference to "Sosla" in my research, and after agonizing, I concluded that the  current name of the town is Zasliai (Zhusli in Yiddish). I suspect that Sosla was a variant name. Olga Zabludoff Zasliai, Lithuania Page Other names: Zhayslyay,Zasliai,Zasliu,Zhaslyay,Zhosli,Zasliu,Zosle,Zosle Zasliai is located 7 kilometers from Kaisadorys. The Jewish cemetery there is on the little hill from the right side of the road just before the entrance to the town. Many tombstones are destroyed, but part of the cemetery still remains
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- Wednesday, September 15, 2004 at 22:12:06 (EDT)
Rabbi Gelgor was most definitely from Olshany. He came to Radzilow as an imported Rabbi. Radzilow was a small town and other Rabbi's in the past were also brought in from other towns. Zvi Potashnik married one of Rabbi Gelgor's daughters. I do not have her name at this point. Zvi submitted a Page of Testimony for Rabbi Gelgor in 1956, stating he was killed in Radzilow. I would imagine Zvi submitted many more POT's, for the Potashnik side of his family, from Olshany, but I don't have those. Rabbi Gelgor's daughter Rywka Gelgor Grajewski was definitely killed in Radzilow. So was Etel Gelgor. There are POT's for both of them. There is some inconsistency about whether Rabbi Gelgor himself was killed in Radzilow or Olshany. It may be he was able to leave Radzilow just before the pogrom, or was spared for some reason, and then headed for Olshany. I will be getting more details from his grandson, who was the son of Sara, another of the Rabbi's daughters. I can't wait to see what material and photos he has, but he is 80 years old and not computer literate. I must wait until he goes to my friend's house and takes his material for him to scan, including large versions of the photos I already have. I looked in http://www2.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golshany/gol383.html and couldn't find reference to Rabbi Gelgor. Could you please scan that page you said his name is listed in? By the way, the granddaughter of Zundel Rozenbaum, the man Rabbi Gelgor wrote the letter about, recently returned to Radzilow. She took photos of the Rabbi's house. Her trip experiences and photos not yet released on my web page, but you can see it at http://www.radzilow.com/rozenbaum-trip.htm Thanks,
Jose Gutstein
- Wednesday, September 15, 2004 at 11:03:48 (EDT)
SHANA TOVA BRIUT VESHALOM ARIE SHEVACH (Of Krasne)
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- Wednesday, September 15, 2004 at 10:59:36 (EDT)
Shana Tova to you and your family, may all our wishes will come true this year, and we all have happiness and good health. Grosbein family (originally of Dolhinov)
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Israel - Wednesday, September 15, 2004 at 10:55:45 (EDT)
I am a little more organized than usual this year, so actually managed to put together an email *before* Rosh Hashana, wishing for all of you and your families to be inscribed for a healthy and happy new year. I'm sorry for the impersonal nature of this mass mailing, but I would be happy to hear from any of you and will reply more personally. I am still working at Fenster & Co., a small patent law firm in Petach Tikvah, writing patents, something I started doing three years ago. Business is starting to pick up again, with the recovery of the high tech sector, and I've been getting plenty of work. I still haven't managed to pass the Israeli patent bar exam, mostly because my Hebrew is not as good as it should be. Debbie is doing some tutoring in English, and looking for more of that, or for something else. Our youngest daughter Mollie graduated from high school in June, and just went into Zahal (Israeli Defense Forces). She will be taking a course in jeep repair (to become an instructor in jeep repair), after four weeks of basic training. It's hard for us (or her) to imagine her repairing jeeps, since her interests run much more to humanities, history and politics, but you never know. Our three oldest kids are living in Washington, DC (Miriam), or New York (Adina and Avi), working and/or taking classes. Regards, Mike Gerver
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- Wednesday, September 15, 2004 at 10:52:01 (EDT)
Erev Rosh Ha-shana, 5765 Wishing everyone of you, family and friends - and all "Am Yisrael" - a happy, healthy and peaceful New Year "Shana Tova u-M'tuka" Susan and Neville Lamdan (Melamed family from Baranovitz)
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- Wednesday, September 15, 2004 at 10:48:26 (EDT)
My paternal great grandparents were Isaac and Nechama Greenhouse from Krasne. Nechama was born in 1842. Does anyone have them on their family tree? I have no other info. Thanks.
Ellen Danziger <ellend@nyct.net>
- Wednesday, September 15, 2004 at 09:50:04 (EDT)
Dear Cousins: We hope this e-mail finds you and your family in the best of health and happiness. The big news in our family is the engagement of our eldest son Elliot to Rena of West Hartford, CT. The wedding will take place, god willing, on December 26th in Agawam, Massachusets. Elliot is in his first year in dental school at the University of Maryland. Rena is a special education teacher. She has moved to Baltimore and started teaching last week. As for our other childen... Ari (almost 21) is a junior at Touro College. He is majoring in psychology. Yudie (19 years old) is in Israel for a second year post high school. He will return to the States for Elliot & Rena's wedding and will then start Queens College. Wishing you and all of our brethren thoughout the world a year of peace, harmony, happiness, health and wealth. K'tiva V'Chatima Tova!!! Robin & Stuart Einbinder ( great grandson of Sara and Zalman Uri Gurevitz of Kurenets)
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- Wednesday, September 15, 2004 at 00:11:17 (EDT)
The SIG has received another file with more records from the 1850 Revision List for shtetls within Vileika uyezd, which was formerly part of Minsk gubernia and later part of Vilna gubernia. Here is the status for each shtetl: COMPLETED AND AVAILABLE FOR VIEWING: Miadel Kurenets Krasnoie (Krasnoselie) Radoshkovichi Vileika - Dolginovo COMPLETED - AWAITING FOR STATIC PAGE TO BE ADDED TO SIG WEBSITE: Krzhivichi (Krivichi) - * need url Gorodok - * need url Butslav (Budslav) - * need url Lebedzev (Lebedevo) -* need url Rzhechki (Rechki) - * need url Kraisk - 150 lines * need url BEING WORKED ON BY TRANSLATOR NOW: Dunilovichi Molodechno Ilia Jews-farmers Once the final four shtetls are completed, work will begin on the 1834 Vileika uyezd Revision Lists. However, we will need additional donations to the Vileika Revision List Project to complete the 1834 lists. Please continue to make generous donations for the project at JewishGenerosity/Belarus Hope many of you find your families in these records. Dave -- David Fox Mail to: davefox73@earthlink.net Belarus SIG Coordinator Arnold, MD USA http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus
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- Monday, September 06, 2004 at 16:32:21 (EDT)
Eliahu wrote..... My family came from Dunilowicze. (To Brazil) The family name is Cepelowicz or in Hebrew letters - ö'ôìåáéõ Maybe the name CEPELOWICS is ZIPELEVITZ (in your list?) The names I have are Eliahu- and Basia (my g-grandfather and g-g-mother) And I have a photo of the family. Also Moshe , Myashka? survived and Immigrated to North America after the war. Thanks ! Eliahu Homburger ------------------------------------------------- I told Eliahu to get in touch with Arie (the grandson of Hinda Rasha nee Cepelowicz of Dunilowicze) Arie Yoselzon wrote.... Myashka Cepelowicz survived the war, my mother knew him very well and told me about him. He lived four houses from her in the same street in Dunilovich near the Bridge. and I have pictures of his house because this is the only house which exist today. He has no relation to the Cepelowicz of my mother. he was together with her until they came to ESHWEGE in GERMANY after the war where he was married. his first wife Chyenke and the children were killed in Dunilovich. Chyenke was related to my father of the Yoselson family from Volkulate. My mother remembers also that Myashka had also a brother and two sisters by the name YITKE and RIVELE. Arie Yoselzon------------------------------------------------------- Yitka died two years ago in Brazil. We know that Myashka remarried after the war and lived in the U.S. He had no children. Myashka' brother is my grandfather; Zusman (in Brazil Jose- Yosef). When I was young I was told that Myashka was urged by his father (Eliyau Cepelowicz- my great grandfather) to escape to the forest- He carried his son on his back and ran. The son was killed when the Germans started firing at them he survivedDoes your mother have any other information? Thank you , Thank you Eliahu Homburger
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- Thursday, August 26, 2004 at 11:35:06 (EDT)
Message: My great-great aunt Dvora-Leah Wolfowich nee Mereminsky & her husband Yehuda were farmers in Derechin. Two of their daughters were killed in Derechin in the Holocaust. Steve Orlen (sorlen@email.arizona.edu) In the list of the perished martyr of Derechin I found; Wolfowich Baruch, Beylka and Hirshl
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- Tuesday, August 24, 2004 at 01:48:38 (EDT)
Message: My last search turned up your web site and lists, which included my mother's name (listed as Bejla Rywkind from Radoszkowicze, Poland arriving in 1921 at the age of 11). This is the same information we have from the ship's manifest. I was surprised it is listed as Lida Gubernia as she and my aunts always said they were from Minska Gubernia. (In 1921 Radoszkowicze was in Poland and Minsk was a few miles away; in the Soviet Union-when your mother was born it was in the Minsk Gubernia changed to Lida/ Poland c 1920- Eilat) I would like to find information about Chaim Moshe Rifkind or Rivkind or Rywkind from Rakov. Also, if anyone knows whether Lagoish is a place or family name or both. (a name of a place near Minsk- Eilat) My father came from Vilna Gubernia also and lived on a street called Miasto Lida. If anyone has any information on a Zolman Ezersky, who was a blacksmith or his son Pesach please contact me. Thanks----- Steve Emers semers@optonline.net
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- Tuesday, August 24, 2004 at 01:12:20 (EDT)
I have just come across your page http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/shiniyuk.html thanks to Google, and although it's close, I'm from a branch of Sheinuks not listed. My grandfather was Louis Sheinuk (birth name Lazer Hirsch), whose brothers were Max and Sam Scheinuk, aka Scheinuk the Florist, in New Orleans. My grandfather immigrated to Springfield, Mass., and then lived in Taunton, Mass. until his death in 1955. His family was from Vilnius (not the city, but a village near Vilnius.) His father's name, as we have it, was Shlaime Baer. According to the family story, Shlaime Baer adopted the name Sheinuk (or Scheinuk) to avoid being drafted into the Russian army, and his originial surname was Weiner. I don't know if you're still collecting this information, but if you are, I thought it might be of interest to you.   Rosanne Sheinuk Cannito Hi Eilat: We are looking for anyone related to the Gittelson Family, formerly of Glubok. What information can we give you to be able to pursue this? Estamos buscando algun de la Familia Gittelson de Glubok. Que informacion se necesita poder continuar con esto situacion? Muchas gracias, Joan Weinberg (para la Familia Gittelson de Tel Aviv)
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- Thursday, August 19, 2004 at 01:46:36 (EDT)
Message: My name is Alex Durmashkin. I live in San Diego for the last 12 years, and I am interested in finding relatives. Alex Durmashkin (alex@russianamerica.com)
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- Thursday, August 19, 2004 at 01:21:15 (EDT)
I have just come across your page http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/shiniyuk.html thanks to Google, and although it's close, I'm from a branch of Sheinuks not listed. My grandfather was Louis Sheinuk (birth name Lazer Hirsch), whose brothers were Max and Sam Scheinuk, aka Scheinuk the Florist, in New Orleans. My grandfather immigrated to Springfield, Mass., and then lived in Taunton, Mass. until his death in 1955. His family was from Vilnius (not the city, but a village near Vilnius.) His father's name, as we have it, was Shlaime Baer. According to the family story, Shlaime Baer adopted the name Sheinuk (or Scheinuk) to avoid being drafted into the Russian army, and his originial surname was Weiner. I don't know if you're still collecting this information, but if you are, I thought it might be of interest to you.   Rosanne Sheinuk Cannito Hi Eilat: We are looking for anyone related to the Gittelson Family, formerly of Glubok. What information can we give you to be able to pursue this? Estamos buscando algun de la Familia Gittelson de Glubok. Que informacion se necesita poder continuar con esto situacion? Muchas gracias, Joan Weinberg (para la Familia Gittelson de Tel Aviv)
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- Thursday, August 19, 2004 at 01:12:19 (EDT)
Czech Jewish official brings Kerry news of his Holocaust dead By Magnus Bennett PRAGUE, March 10 (JTA) It hasnt been long since Sen. John Kerry learned that he had relatives who were killed in the Holocaust. Now Kerry, the presumptive Democratic nominee for president, is getting documents about the last days of his paternal grandmothers brother and sister. During a visit to New York on Sunday, the chairman of Pragues Jewish community, Tomas Jelinek, presented the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research with copies of the original transport lists for Otto and Jenny Loewe Kerrys paternal grandmothers brother and sister, who were sent to their deaths on Nazi transports. Jelinek said he decided to track down the records in Prague after learning about Kerrys Jewish roots from American media reports. I presented copies of the records to YIVO as a gift and asked them to pass them on to Sen. Kerry, Jelinek told JTA. We know how touching this kind of information is for Jewish communities in Europe and thought it would be of interest to Sen. Kerrys family. The records show that Otto, who was born in Budapest, was transported from Vienna to Terezin transit camp Theresienstadt on transport number IV/7-321 on July 14, 1942. He died at Theresienstadt on June 29, 1943. His sister, Jenny, was transported from Vienna to Theresienstadt on transport number IV/7-319. on Aug. 14, 1942. On Sept. 26, 1942, she was sent from Theresienstadt to the Maly Trostinec concentration camp in Belarus, where she subsequently was killed. Jelinek presented the records at the launch of an exhibition of the works of the late Czech artist Alfred Kantor, who depicted scenes of everyday Nazi brutality during the Holocaust. Kantor, who survived Theresienstadt, produced 127 drawings and sketches from memory after the originals had been lost. Kantor emigrated to the United States after the war and died last year in Maine. Jelinek also was in New York to launch a fund-raising drive for a new $6 million senior home for Holocaust survivors in Prague, called Project Hagibor. The planned 60-bed facility aims to provide round-the-clock care for some of Pragues estimated 1,500 Holocaust survivors. Former Czech President Vaclav Havel is behind the project. In the history of our country, the biggest killing of Czech citizens in one day happened in Auschwitz-Birkenau on March 8, 60 years ago, Havel wrote in a letter of support for the project. Entire families, including children, were killed. The only thing that made them guilty was being Jewish. Havel said he is afraid that there remains a lot of indifference in Czech society to the Holocaust. I am afraid something only a very few people admit that our present indifference towards this and other tragedies of the past and present makes us accomplices, he wrote. I am very happy that you are meeting today to honor the memory of those who are deceased and at the same time to support a project that should help to lessen the life hardships of those who used to be prisoners in the concentration camps and ghettos, at least in their twilight years, he wrote. © JTA. Reproduction of material without written permission is strictly prohibited.
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- Tuesday, August 17, 2004 at 00:51:56 (EDT)
Message: I am researching my maternal grandmother's family from Horodok or Grodek Jagiellonski as she called it. Her name at birth was BLASER, the family owned a flour mill in Grudek. Her grandmother's name was JACHET NEIS - I have not been able to find out whether the NEIS family came from Grudek or not. My greatgrandfather Menachem BLASER left for London during or before the First World War and settled there. His sister Mindel BLASER married Rabbi Binyamin GALLER from Kriviche and their son MORDECHAI GALLER came to Israel. He was one of 12 brothers, 9 of whom perished in the Holocaust. Has anyone come across those names - BLASER OR BLAZER OR NEIS / NEISS OR GALLER?
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- Monday, August 16, 2004 at 10:07:07 (EDT)
Message: I am researching my maternal grandmother's family from Horodok or Grodek Jagiellonski as she called it. Her name at birth was BLASER, the family owned a flour mill in Grudek. Her grandmother's name was JACHET NEIS - I have not been able to find out whether the NEIS family came from Grudek or not. My greatgrandfather Menachem BLASER left for London during or before the First World War and settled there. His sister Mindel BLASER married Rabbi Binyamin GALLER from Kriviche and their son MORDECHAI GALLER came to Israel. He was one of 12 brothers, 9 of whom perished in the Holocaust. Has anyone come across those names - BLASER OR BLAZER OR NEIS / NEISS OR GALLER?
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- Monday, August 16, 2004 at 10:06:06 (EDT)
138. Swerdlin A.; Textile 139. Swerdlin E; Tailor 48 Swerdlin,Nossun Domilowicz, Russia 1914  18    Nathan Swerdlin, born 1907. He lived in Vilna where he studied law and political science in the University. In 1936, he came to New York where he received his doctorate. From 1928-36, he was a co- writer in the Vilna daily paper "The Time". In 1945, he was part-time writer for the "Tog" and the "Tog Morgen Journal" where he became arts and theater editor. He wrote about film, arts, music and about Jewish theater and also contributed to the "Theater Mirror" in Paris and the "Tzukunft". He co-authored with Zilbervieg, the "A Lexicon of Jewish Theater". He died in 1981 in New York. Berl Kagan: Tales of My Father's House Kupishok (Kupiskis, Lithuania) 55°50'/24°58' SWERDLIN A 1966 PWBS Banquet Reservations SWERDLIN I J 1966 PWBS Banquet Reservations SWERDLIN J 1966 PWBS Banquet Reservations SWERDLIN M 1966 PWBS Banquet Reservations Polotzker's Workingmen's Benevolent SocietyPolotsk, Polotsk uezd, Vitebsk gubernia Landsmenshaften, Benevolent Societies, and Burial Societies". SWERDLIN Shaul No. of family members who died 4 SWERDLIN, Israel Yankel, 2. list from Globokie natives who perished Hlybokaye, Belarus [Pages 257-268] 4 perished in Radoshkowitz Swerdlin, Hanan, his wife, Bracha (née Tzertzes) and their children: Shimon, Baruch and Bryna Radoshkowitz Sefer Zikaron--Pages 55-60 Swerdlin and company - pension actuaries and employee benefit consultants located in atlanta, georgia. our primary objective in providing actuarial and employee benefit consulting services is to ensure only the highest quality, most professional and completely independent advice to our clients.
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- Saturday, August 14, 2004 at 23:49:52 (EDT)
My grandfather was from (now) Belarus, close to Vilinus in Lithuania. Does anyone know of any Swerdlin's (spelling may be a little different) that are still in Belarus? Any hint to any ancestry of my last name? Thanks so much. Jonathan Asher Swerdlin (swerdlin@gmail.com)
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- Saturday, August 07, 2004 at 10:10:17 (EDT)
Sascha Nechaevsky Hello, My Family is from Druya, Oy To Drya! http://www.mentalblog.com/ The map of the greatest Jews on earth Thanks for the site, Sascha
http://www.mentalblog.com/
- Friday, August 06, 2004 at 16:05:32 (EDT)
Feyga E. Alpert (feyga@frontiernet.net) on Saturday, July 31, 2004 at 12:21:52 --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: Comment Home Page: http:// Message: Because mine is an old Jewish name rarely seen or heard of in modern times, I was amazed to find it in my search. I come to the name from my father's side as it was his grandmother's. His family hailed from Vilna and his father (Hyman Alpert) came to the USA in the early 1900's.
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USA - Wednesday, August 04, 2004 at 18:42:12 (EDT)
18 Durmaszkein,Liza Kircoh 1906  6    19 Durmaszkein,Rachel Kircoh 1906  43    20 Durmaszkein,Refol Kircoh 1906  15    21 Durmaszkein,Sonia Kircoh 1906  9  Manifest for Deutschland Sailing from Hamburg ; April 26, 1906 ; 0005.  Durmaszkein, Rachel F 43 years old M Russia Hebrew Kircoh 0006.  Durmaszkein, Refoel M 15 years old S Russia Hebrew Kircoh 0007.  Durmaszkein, Liza F 6 years old S Russia Hebrew Kircoh 0008.  Durmaszkein, Sonia F 9 years old S Russia Hebrew Kircoh
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- Thursday, July 29, 2004 at 12:26:48 (EDT)
Information for Barbara nee Dourmashkin of California ; Name Birth Date Death Date Last Residence (City,County,State) Issued SSN Save This Order Record Leonard Dourmashkin 12 Aug 1921 1 Aug 1994 Ardsley, Westchester, New York Vermont (Before 1951 ) 008-16-5197 Sara Dourmashkin 26 Jun 1898 Mar 1985 New York, New York, New York New York (1958-1959 ) 128-32-2239 V Name: Dourmashkin, Ralph Leo Birth - Death: 1891- Accession Number: 1124886 Source Citation: Encyclopedia of American Biography. New Series. Volume 11. New York: The American Historical Society. Use the Index to locate biographies.(EncAB-A 11) Biography contains portrait. Who Was Who among North American Authors, 1921-1939. Compiled from [Who's Who among North American Authors,] Volumes 1-7, 1921-1939. Two volumes. Gale Composite Biographical Dictionary Series, Number 1. Detroit: Gale Research, 1976.(WhNAA) Name: Dourmashkin, Ralph Leo Birth - Death: 1891-1956 Accession Number: 1124887 Source Citation: Biography Index. A cumulative index to biographical material in books and magazines. Volume 4: September, 1955-August, 1958. New York: H.W. Wilson Co., 1960.(BioIn 4) Name: Dourmashkin, Robert Ralph Birth - Death: 1925- Accession Number: 1124888 Source Citation: International Medical Who's Who. A biographical guide in medical research. First edition. Two volumes. Harlow, United Kingdom: Longman Group, 1980.(IntMed) Name Declaration Volume Declaration Page Petition Volume Petition Page Index to Declaration of Intent for Naturalization: New York County, 1907-1924 ; Raphael Dourmashkin 28 224     Elias Dourmashkin 263 328     Sophie Dourmashkin 470 73 ----------- Conductor Wolf (Zeev) Durmashkin On 19 September 1999, upon the initiative of famous Lithuanian journalist Pranas Morkus, a commemorative concert was held on the stage of the present "Lëlës" Theatre where Vilnius Ghetto Theatre was situated during the Holocaust. The concert was dedicated to the wonderful musician, conductor Wolf (Zeev) Durmashkin, and musicians of the symphony orchestra of the Ghetto. The organiser and artistic manager of the orchestra V.Durmashkin was already a star in the musical life of Lithuania by the eve of World War II: he could have become the star of exclusive brightness, however, this extraordinary artist and his artistic work was only given a tight space of Vilnius Ghetto Theatre rather that the entire world, fifteen months of creative life, and nightmare of routine. He should have had a strong spirit: being condemned to hunger and death he used this short period of time to prepare and hold thirty-five chamber and symphony concerts! The last one was took place on 29 August 1943, three and a half weeks until the very liquidation of Vilnius Ghetto. The impressive conductor perished in Klooga concentration camp on 19 August 1944 at the age of just thirty years. Name: Durmashkin, Henny Also known as: Gurko, Henny Durmashkin Born: 1924 (Vilna) Died: 2002 (USA) Tracks with this artist Title: Alu L'erets Avot -- ??? ???? ???? Also known as: Alu Alu Genre: Israeli/Zionist Subject: Land/Fathers/Pioneer Origin: Alb N-014(a)/ Transliteration: Alb L-009(a)/Alb N-014(a) Translation: Alb N-014(a) Music: Nath 92 On album: D-007(a) (Songs To Remember Henny Durmashkin -- Artist Durmashkin, Henny -- Artist Durmashkin, Fanny, piano acc -- First line: Alu, alu, l'erets avot, l'artsenu alu beshir uvimkholot, .. Language: Hebrew Style: Hora Title: Bal Melokhes -- On album: D-007(a) (Songs To Remember Henny Durmashkin -- Author/Composer Brassens, Georges Artist Durmashkin, Henny -- Artist Durmashkin, Fanny, piano acc -- First line: Tog azoy vi tog, nakht azoy vi nakht, shtendik mit der nodl DURMASCHKIN, Fanny    born in 1926    Found in Germany     Vilnius Vilnius Vilnius  Lithuanian Holocaust Survivers Lists 1946     DURMASCHKIN, Henny       Found in Germany     Vilnius Vilnius Vilnius  Lithuanian Holocaust Survivers Lists 1946  Lithuania Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners Volume 1 305  Vilnius Vilnius Vilnius  May 1942  DURMASKIN, Seindla 1904  Strasuno 7 Vilna Gaon State Museum of Lithuania Vilnius Ghetto: Lists of Prisoners Volume 1 305  Vilnius Vilnius Vilnius  May 1942  TEREMISHKIN, Marek Enukh   medium,4,5 kopecks Candle Taxpayers  23 May 1846  Telsiai Telsiai Kaunas  KRA/I-49/1/1381 128 1171  TEREMISHKIN, Freyda    Marek's wife Candle Taxpayers  23 May 1846  Telsiai Telsiai Kaunas  KRA/I-49/1/1381 128 1171 
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- Thursday, July 29, 2004 at 11:35:45 (EDT)
Information about Malka Weissman ( nee Schmidt ) of Lebedova -- from a phone conversation to Qiryat-Motskin , Israel, July 22, 2004: Malka was born 1920, town: Lebedova father's name: Alter Schmidt Alter had one brother who died in the war- mother: Bella nee Shayevitz? , there were six sisters in her family, they were also originally from Lebedova (some family members lived in New York). Malka had a sister named Batyah, known as 'Batyah the Genuis', born in 1922. her brother, Ytzhak, was born in 1925 father's brother was killed in the war (?) when the soviets came to the area in 1939, she used the opportunity and went to a teachers seminary in Molodechno the school had been established by the Russians. She met many other Jewish men and women in the teachers' seminary in Molodechno , including some from Kurenetz. Zukerman - most common name in Levedova, half the town had that last name. Malka was visiting her grandson and he showed her the site and she was very excited after so many year to see for the first time all the people she recognised. Her son lives in area of Haifa in Israel. she lives in Tel Aviv area. Her She couldn't sleep the entire night, she had tears in her eyes seeing all the people; She recognised all her leaders in the youth movement; Hashomer Hatzair, school teachers, and her entire family. In the 1929 business; Schmidt B. - fabric and textile
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- Thursday, July 22, 2004 at 14:39:37 (EDT)
Hi Eilat,   I'm sending you pictures (2 emails)  from my grandmother home town "Lebedova".   My grandmother is Malka Weissman ( her previous name is Schmidt ).   The pictures include her family members and more "Lebedova" friends.   Please send me a confirmation that the photos are O.K   Thank you---   Omry Zolberg, Qiryat-Motskin Israel
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- Thursday, July 22, 2004 at 13:56:11 (EDT)
Hello, after many year,  I finally looked up Kurnitz ( that's how I thought it was spelt [but now see there were many variations] ).  My Aunt Ida ( maiden name was Alpert ) told  me that it was either in Poland and/or Russia.   Do you know of any people who knew my Grandparents Abraham and Frieda Alpert when they were younger in Russia. ? They were supposed to be related yet one entered the US as Alperowitz and the other as Alperovitz... or,  was this just the matter of dealing with different individuals recording the information &/or was translating at the time of arrival?   I had already known for a long time that  they came 5 years apart. I have just seen the site with the names from Kurnitz and it seems that my Father's Father came in 1913, and then, my Father's Mother came in 1918. It was wonderful to see Sammy Dimenstein's picture on the web page.  My Father ( Samuel or Sam Alpert ) was very close to him.  I had no idea until now that the Dimensteins also came from the Kurnitz area.  We lived at 40 Marvel Road when we grew up and I have a sister, Fredda, and a brother, Andrew.  Of course they have their extended families now.  Fredda is married to Leonard Broverman and lives in Sudbury, MA. Andy is married to Laurie ( Mink [maiden name] ) .  They live in Hollywood, Florida.  My Mom, Charlotte ( Alberts [maiden name] )  remarried to Hyman Shelnitz after my Dad died suddenly ( pulmonary embolism a few days after  knee surgery ) in 1967.  Unfortunately Hy, also passed away,  in September of 2001. So.... my Mom was an Alberts who married an Alpert.    And my paternal grandparents were supposedly first cousins with the same last name of Alperowitz or up until know I thought, Alperovitz.   Any info always appreciated. Thanks, Sheryl (Sherry Alpert) Lee Sessa  
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- Thursday, July 22, 2004 at 13:45:55 (EDT)
My mother, went over the list of survivors from Dunilowich she found heself in the list. there was a mistake. In Dunilowitch lived only one Ruderman family; Ruderman Zalman' family who owned a shoe and hide products store before the war. He was the only son of Nathan Ruderman and Hinda Feyga nee Yofee. My grandfather Zalman married Hinda rasha nee Zipilevitz who had very large family. My mother is the oldest daughter of Zalman and Hinda Rasha. They had eight children. One daughter died of illness before the war. Out of the seven others- four perished. They were killed by the Germans and their collaborators. one brother was killed a week before libaration and was taken to be burried in Dunilowitch by his brother, Shepsel who survived as a partisan. After the war Shepsel Ruderman moved to Toronto - he had two children (son is a physician) . my mothers sister (Breina ) was married before the war- her husband and child perished and after the war she married Barka friedman who lost his wife and three children. They had a daughter; Atia   Immigrated to North America after the war (should be corrected)   RUDERMAN Yitshka   should be RUDERMAN Yithka     please look again in the original list   My great grandfather was Nathan RUDERMAN- he had a brother; Mendel - Mendels' son was David. David lived with his family in Glubokie. His son; RUDERMAN Yaakov (Yankale) was the only family member who survived as a partisan. Yankale RUDERMAN erected a memorial to the Glubokie Jews who perished. A few weeks ago we attended the 60 years anniversary to the liberation of Glubokie as guests of the town. Arie Yoselzon The Slawins are also related
http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/dunilovichi/dun_pages/dun_stories_foundation.html
- Thursday, July 22, 2004 at 11:09:48 (EDT)
Message: My paternal grandparents came from Russia in the early 1900's and no one in my family seems to have any idea of my lineage except that we originate from the Minsk area and 'may be related to Shimon Perez'. That 'may be related to' I take with a grain of salt as I feel as though several people would most likely claim a relationship even if there's no possibility. Anyone who reads this and can give me some insight as to where to look I would appreciate it. You can e-mail me at LeighPersky@mc-ala.org.....thanks ---------------- Shimon Peres ' father was Getzel Persky of Vishnevo (pictured with wife on the Vishnevo site- his sister lived and perished in Kurenets, her name was Eltka (nee Persky) Rabunski. you could find her pictures on the Kurenets site.
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- Thursday, July 22, 2004 at 00:30:58 (EDT)
I have identified the following family surnames from LEBEDOVA: DINERSTEIN, GOLUB, KOPLWICH (tz), ZUCKERMAN. If you have similar names from Lebedova or vicinity, please contact me so we can compare notes. Gary Rabbi Gary M. Gans Marlton, NJ USA rabbigansatcomcast.net Message: My father will be 80 years old this summer and I am collecting information about his family as a gift for him. Both his parents were born in Lebedewo although they met and married in America. His maternal grandfather, Avraham Boruch Beinson (sp?), was the first to arrive in the US. His wife (Sore) and three young children (Rachel, Blume and Leib) joined him in 1899. My grand- father (my father's father), Hirsch Beininson, arrived as a young man in 1906. His father's name, I believe, was Moische Lazer. I would like to know more about life in Lebedewo in the late 19th century. Any information at all would be so deeply appreciated. With many thanks for the opportunity to even make this request! Melissa Benson
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- Thursday, July 22, 2004 at 00:22:09 (EDT)
Message: My name is Martin C. Meltzer, I am the son of Samuel Meltzer. His parent were Alexander and Rose Meltzer who lived in Union City. His brothers were Lawrnce,Leo, Moe. and Syndy. He had a sister Esther. My grandfather Alexander came to America in 1903, and my Grandmother came in 1096 with Lawrence. I am looking for Edward Meltzer who believes his great grandfather Lewis was my grandfather's (Alexander) brother. My email is mmeltzer@ci.wilmington.de.us or martin.meltzer@verizon.net I live in Delaware, USA.
Martin C. Meltzer
- Thursday, July 22, 2004 at 00:16:32 (EDT)
RASHISH , Pinchas son of Meir died 20-Jun-1978  Cemetery Name City / Country Segulah Petach Tikvah / Israel RASHISH / , Moshe /     son of Pinchas  died 13-Nov-1958  Cemetery Name City / Country Segulah Petach Tikvah / Israel RASHISH  Chedvah died; 08-Sep-1970  Father; Yitzchak  Segulah Petach Tikvah / Israel RASHISH  , Chava  died; 31-Dec-1984  father; Chaim Segulah Petach Tikvah / Israel RASHISH , Moshe died; 24-May-1974    father; Noach  Segulah Petach Tikvah / Israel Name(Other Surnames) Date of Death Date of Birth/ Age More InformationCemetery Name / City / Country ALFOROVITZ / ?????????, Reuven / ????? 26-Dec-1983    View Full Burial RecordSegulah / Petach Tikvah / Israel ALPEROVITZ / ????????, Nachman / ???? 10-May-1992  1927 Age: 65  View Full Burial RecordSegulah / Petach Tikvah / Israel ALPEROVITZ / ????????, Genia / ???? 09-Jun-1972    View Full Burial RecordSegulah / Petach Tikvah / Israel ALPEROVITZ / ????????, Tziporah / ????? 18-May-1989    View Full Burial RecordSegulah / Petach Tikvah / Israel ALPEROVITZ / ????????, Yitzchak / ???? 02-Jul-1975    View Full Burial RecordSegulah / Petach Tikvah / Israel ALPEROVITZ / ????????, Meir / ???? 06-May-1951    View Full Burial RecordSegulah / Petach Tikvah / Israel ELPROVITZKA / ??????????, Sheine / ????? 04-Jul-1993  1904 Age: 89  View Full Burial RecordSegulah / Petach Tikvah / Israel
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/cemetery/
- Friday, July 16, 2004 at 10:51:13 (EDT)
Message: Shalom, I have identified the following family surnames from LEBEDOVA: DINERSTEIN, GOLUB, KOPLWICH (tz), ZUCKERMAN. If you have similar names from Lebedova or vicinity, please contact me so we can compare notes. Rabbi Gary M. Gans Marlton, NJ USA ggans@yahoo.com
. <ggans@yahoo.com>
- Thursday, July 15, 2004 at 16:24:30 (EDT)
I am the son of Ida Ytke Ruderman the daughter of Zalman Ruderman from Dunilowich my mother is alive and made aliyah after the war and reside in Israel since 1949 She is the sister of Shepsel and Breine.   I visited Dunilowich and Globokie last week with my brother, sister and other family members.   I am interested in pictures and more information about Dunilowich my father was born in volkulate, 17 km from Dunilowich ---------------------------------------------------------------------------  ARIE YOSELZON Israel- yoselzon@inter.net.il ----------------------- Dunilowicze Business in 1929----- Facts: Village (near Postawy, in the Wilna region) Has its own peacetime court (a subsidiary of the Wilna court of justice). Population: 1386. Railroad: 9 km . Has a Regional Administrative Office, Trade Union, power station. Churches: 2 Catholic Markets: held on tuesdays. Local production: leather goods, flour and grains. Doctors, medical: Brudny Eljasz; ukowska Wlora Dentists: Pruan Olga Doctors, Veterinary: Rutkowski Kalikst Lawyers, Attorney: Trocki Aron Comissioning Agencies: Ginzburg M. Midwives: Wiockowska Stanislawa. Drugstore owners: Chackiolewicz Ch.; Robinow Sz. Apothecaries: Chaskielewicz Izrael Tinners: Weksler Sz. Silk-weavers: Bensman W.; Cimachowicz E.; Glazman Ch.; Kasimow S.; Klonski Z.; Mindel R.; Swerdlin A.; Swerdlin J.; Sznejder L.; Goz G. Cattle-traders: Chodos N. & L. Brickmakers: Tyszkleicz jr. Josef Hatmakers: Abel J. Woodworkers: Goldman I.; Trocki A. Electricians: Tyszklewicz hr. Jos Housepainters: Rozow Ch. Paramedics: Lukszo P. Photographers: Wulfowicz S. Hairdressers: Perman M.; Smolak S. Leather-tanners: Mejszutowicz A.; Paltaszycki S. Teahouse Emporia: Icykson S.; Narocka D.; Narocka S. Hotel d'Maitres: Sznejder Ch. Book-binders: Mindel P. Bathouses: Nywkin B. Colonial Wares (Deli): Bejrak J.; Chajkin R.; Gendel A.; Gendel C.; Gurwicz D.; Joffe Ch.; Kacowicz S.; Kloner F.; Kopelowicz Ch.; Swerlin S.; Szapiro B.; Taje S.; ZAjdel M. Stable-owner: Gendel L.; Zajdel S. Co-ops: 'Rolnik'; 'Siemie' Blacksmiths: Gordon I. Tailors: Berman M.; Dratwa M.; Gordon Ch.; Gordon S.; Kloner J.; Narocki S. Womens' Clothing Designers: Gordon G.; Lipska J. Librarians: Bejrak J. Woodcutters: Zynger I. & Pergmanet L. Linen-workers: Szapiro J. & Kajacki Z. Millkeepers: Koseinkiewicz Bron; Tyszkiewicz jr. Joz. Masons: Masinski J. Shoe merchants: Gordon Ch.; Neuch M. Oil-pressers: Tyszkiewicz jr. J Bakers: Cojtel M.; Narocka D.; Perowozkin Sz.; Sinica A.; Sznejder E. Pubkeepers: Chodos A. & Goldman A.; Gordon Ch.; Kloner S.; Mindel L.; Nawoj Z.; Szneider N. Brewers: Goldman Sz. Merchants of Assorted Goods: Awerbuch f.; Engelson Ch.; Fejgiel S.; Fisz F.; Gordon J.; Gurwicz Ch.; Gurwicz S.; Kamenkowicz B.; Kloner Sz.; Kolko Rolniszo; Liwszyc M; Radoszkowicz L.; Skiranska R.; Skiranski D.; Srolewicz I. Fishermen: Mindel J. Saddle-makers: Zajac A.; Zajac N. Butchers: Bruskin M.; Frydman Sz.; Kopelowicz I.; Kurycki Sz.; Szerel A. Cheese-merchants: Breskin I. Preparers of animal hides:: Abelewicz R.; Ruderman Z.; Sztejngrot I. Liquor salesmen: Dziemloszono E.; Weber W. Household Goods Salesman: Abelowicz N.; Cepelowicz G.; Cepelowicz L.; Cepelowicz M.; Cepelowicz P.; Finkielsztejn L.; Gordon D.; Gurwicz Sz.; Ligumska S.; Minches S.; Geskin J.; Sznejder L.; Sznejder Sz. Carpenters: Chudoba B.; Klonder Sz. Cloth-merhants: Tyskiewicz jr. Joz Tailors: Druc I.; Gelfenbaum D.; Szczepaniak J.; Tuder M. Locksmiths: Zielinski J. Artillery merchants: Tyskiewicz jr. Joz Fish farmers: Kosciuszkiewicz B. Tobacco-manufacturing: Gordon K.; Kopelowicz B.; Skiranski A. Grainkeepers: Felszer A. & L. Oven-builders: Kondratowicz S. Watchmakers: Perman M.
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- Wednesday, July 14, 2004 at 21:47:56 (EDT)
To: All Vishnive Families and Descendents From: Dvora Helberg 3/3 Savion Street Modiin 71700 Israel Phone: 011-972-8-9700407 e-mail: helberg@netvision.net.il Date: June 14th , 2004 Renovation of the Jewish Cemetery in Vishnive Progress Report Dear Friends, The status of the project is as follows: 1. The clearing and removal of the wild growth of trees, thorny bushes and grass from the Jewish Cemetery has been accomplished. Pesticides were sprayed to prevent regrowth. The work was done by the crew of Mr. Yuri Dorn, President of The Jewish Communities in Belarus. ------------------------------------------------------------ 2. Ms. Regina Kopilevich, who initiated the work, helped us accelerate its pace by getting us in touch with Mr. Dorn. ------------------------------------------------------------ 3. Pictures of the current status of the cemetery are depicted on the internet site The Shtetl and I. The link for the pictures is http://www.geocities.com/biography1915/projeng3.html ------------------------------------------------------------- 4. We are currently working on mapping and documenting of the tombstones. According to Mr. Dorn there are about 400 tombstones in the cemetery. Some are standing straight, others are toppled and 10%-15% are broken. We intend to map the cemetery, erect the unbroken stones and reconstruct the broken ones. At the completion of this work each tombstone will be digitally photographed at its location in the cemetery so that it could be seen on the internet. ------------------------------------------------------------- 5. As previously discussed, we are taking the following steps: I. The erection of a Memorial marker at the site of the mass grave in the cemetery where the first group of thirty-eight Jewish victims was gunned down in 1941.---------------------------------------- II. An addition to the existing Krave Street Memorial where the remaining two-thousand members of the Jewish community were slaughtered and burned in 1942. The memorial will now state clearly in English, Hebrew and Russian that all of the victims were Jews who were murdered by the Nazis and their local collaborators. ------------------------ III. The building of a fence around the Jewish cemetery. ----------------------------------- In order to complete the project we need additional budget for two important items: ---------------------- a. Reconstruction and erection of the broken tombstones.---------------------------- -b. Building a fence around the cemetery. -------------------- We are asking you to make an additional contribution for this invaluable project. Any amount will be welcomed and appreciated. The opportunity is now. Let us not miss it! As before, Ms. Zane Buzby volunteered to collect donations in the USA. address: Zane Buzby 2658 Griffith Park Blvd., #299 Los Angeles, California 90039 USA phone: (323) 223-5566 email: cbmail@earthlink.net
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- Saturday, July 03, 2004 at 23:43:21 (EDT)
Dear Eilat Gordin Levitan;   I was informed by Mr Randy Daitch that you might be able to assist me in tracing my Jewish family roots in Belarus.    Though my name now is Takahashi, I was born Saul Israel Chodos, in the United States. My grandfather, Israel Chodos, was born in either 1899 or 1900, and emigrated to the United States with his family when he was five years old. My understanding is that my grandfather originated in a community of (I believe Polish speaking) Jews in the Myadel region of Belarus. My great grandfather was named Schrage Feyvush Chodos, and it appears that in Belarus he was somewhat of a scholar, and a rabbinical student (my grandfather eventually became a rabbi in the United States, keeping with the family tradition).   Unfortunately, that is really all the information I have. My grandfather passed on before I was born, and nobody in the family appears to have any more detailed information. The only other factoid I can provide is that both my great grandfather and my grandfather were (like all their offsprings, myself included) very big men; generally over 190 cm tall and broad shouldered.  for Myadel;
www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Myadel/
- Thursday, July 01, 2004 at 21:20:40 (EDT)
With the establishment of the Department of Homeland Security as part of the U.S. cabinet, as a consequence of the lack of preparedness in September 2001, the Secret Service was transferred to its care from the Treasury. Amit Yoran, 33, who was appointed to head the National Cyber Security Division in Homeland Security, is the son of former Israelis, a founder and partner (with his brother Elad, like him a graduate of the military academy at West Point) of the information-security firm Riptech, which they sold for $145 million to a larger company, Symantec. a West Point graduate. He served as a cryptology specialist, and after a few years, he, along with his West Point graduate brother Elad, started their own cybersecurity business, Riptech. Four years later they were bought out by Symantec, another cybersecurity firm, for a tidy $145 million. Knowledgeable but cynical people in the computer security field, give Yoran high marks for really having a clue about the complexity of issues. He does not have a reputation as a blowhard or hiding from reality. Which makes the person down the hall from him, all the more curious, considering the fact that Yoran should have more than a passing interest in communicating concerns that this nations super-important, super-vital, supercomputers and Grid/TeraGrid are vulnerable to attack. One would assume the director of the National Cyber Security Division in the Department of Homeland Security would want to talk to the press about these concerns and plans. Wrong. October 2003 Yoran last month was appointed the nation's newest cybersecurity czar, succeeding Richard Clarke, who resigned from the post before his office was folded into the Department of Homeland Security. Unlike Clarke, though, Yoran doesn't have the same position or stature in Washington power circles. Yoran, a West Point graduate, was born in the US, the son of Israeli emigrants in the 1960s
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- Tuesday, June 29, 2004 at 08:12:34 (EDT)
At present our website gives information on  the following types of genealogical documents: parish registers census records genealogical records of the nobility genealogical records of the state regional archives As soon as our website has been indexed for these and other genealogical sources, it will provide users with more detailed information. For convenience of our users being interested in genealogy, we give here the reference information on the  administrative-territorial division of Belarus in the 19th and 20th centuries. For the last ten years, archivists in Belarus have been cooperating with the Routes to Roots Foundation, Inc. headed by Miriam Weiner to compile a town-by-town inventory of archival documents on Jewish genealogy now available in a searchable database on the internet (at no cost to inquirer). The RTR Foundation website at www.rtrfoundation.org includes extensive information about our archival documents as well as several chapters written by archivists in Belarus. The website also includes maps and map resources for Belarus and other valuable information. The website consists of two parts: (1) a 350-page book and (2) a searchable database of archive inventories for towns in Belarus, Poland, Ukraine, Moldova and Lithuania. Various data on Jewish genealogy you can find also on the Jewishgen website at www.jewishgen.org/Belarus. http://www.archives.gov.by/EItd/erx_gen.htm
http://www.archives.gov.by/EItd/erx_gen.htm
- Friday, June 25, 2004 at 10:16:19 (EDT)
Message: I am doing a genealogy on my family. My grandmothers last name is Kantorowicz (spelt many different ways for polish spelling) My great grandparent moved to the United States from Poland in late 1910's. Our family is trying to do great research on them. We have no known information past my great grandparents who are deceased. We have heard they may be Jewish and that any Kantorowicz (or close spelling) is a relative. If anyone has information please e-mail me at neidsvold@hotmail.com My great grandmother was Mary Franczak born 1903 in Krocshaw Poland and my great grand father was Stefan Kantorowicz born 1898 in Radka to Joesoph and Rozalijia Kantorowicz. Any information is greatly appreciated! Nichole Erickson (neidsvold@hotmail.com) --From the Ellis Island data; ------------------------------------ 1 Kantorowicz,... Uzdy, Poland 1921  10  - 2 Kantorowicz,Abraham Russia 1908  18  - 3 Kantorowicz,Abram Puchceicz, Poland 1921  14  - 4 Kantorowicz,Abram Baranowice, Poland 1921  16  - 5 Kantorowicz,Abram Prusinok 1906  23   - 6 Kantorowicz,Abram Minsk 1905  26  - 7 Kantorowicz,Abram Waszeluzwi 1905  18   - 8 Kantorowicz,Abram Smolewitz 1904  8  - 9 Kantorowicz,Abram Baranowicz 1902  4  - 10 Kantorowicz,Abram Russia 1907  17   - 11 Kantorowicz,Adolf Wilan 1892  10  - 12 Kantorowicz,Aron Baranowicz, Russia 1920  14  - 13 Kantorowicz,Aron   1923  0   - 14 Kantorowicz,Barse Uzda 1901  35  - 15 Kantorowicz,Basche Huslaw, Russia 1910  20   - 16 Kantorowicz,Baschl Sokol 1901  8   - 17 Kantorowicz,Bejla Bebrujak, Russia 1923  25   - 18 Kantorowicz,Berek Dobczyce, Poland 1921  14  - 19 Kantorowicz,Berel Baranowicze, Poland 1923  56  - 20 Kantorowicz,Berel Paranowicze, Poland 1923  56  - 21 Kantorowicz,Berl Natofhe 1905  8   - 22 Kantorowicz,Bernhd Wilan 1892  40   - 23 Kantorowicz,Berthold   1895  25  - 24 Kantorowicz,Besta Uzdy, Poland - 25 Kantorowicz,Blieje Aesda, Russia 1913  13   - 26 Kantorowicz,Bobka Zabludow, Poland 1921  29   - 27 Kantorowicz,Brocha Minsk, Russia 1912  17   - 28 Kantorowicz,Chaie Uzdy 1906  18   - 29 Kantorowicz,Chaie Baranowicz 1905  18  - 30 Kantorowicz,Chaie Baranowicz 1902  28   - 31 Kantorowicz,Chaie Sokol 1901  49   - 32 Kantorowicz,Chail Moleziad 1903  3   - 33 Kantorowicz,Chaim Musde 1904  28  - 34 Kantorowicz,Chaja Pinsk, Poland 1923  58   - 35 Kantorowicz,Chaja Wilno, Pinsk Region 1922  0  - 36 Kantorowicz,Chane Minsk, Russia 1907  22  - 37 Kantorowicz,Chane Pinsk 1906  20   - 38 Kantorowicz,Chane Minsk 1902  20   - 39 Kantorowicz,Channe   1892  50   - 40 Kantorowicz,Chjenne Rotterdam 1904  25   - 41 Kantorowicz,Chonne Minsk, Russia 1910  30  - 42 Kantorowicz,David Harobin, Russia 1913  17   - 43 Kantorowicz,David Vilno, Pinsk Region 1922  63   - 44 Kantorowicz,Dawid Lodz, Russia 1910  23   - 45 Kantorowicz,Dawid Los, Russia 1922  12   - 46 Kantorowicz,Doba Radoszkowicze, Poland 1923  18  - 47 Kantorowicz,Doba Borisow, Russia 1922  58  - 48 Kantorowicz,Dobe Glusk, Russia 1910  17  - 49 Kantorowicz,Dora Dobczyce, Poland 1921  47   - 50 Kantorowicz,Dora Bialyatok, Poland 1923  24   - 51 Kantorowicz,Dwejra Zaskiewicze, Pinsk Reg. 1922  22   - 52 Kantorowicz,Dyna Lochowicze, Poland 1923  29   - 53 Kantorowicz,Dyna Los, Russia 1922  9  - 54 Kantorowicz,Efraim Dobczyce, Poland 1921  18   - 55 Kantorowicz,Eliase Suwathi, Poland 1923  52  - 56 Kantorowicz,Elka Zaskiewicze, Pinsk Reg. 1922  21  - 57 Kantorowicz,Elke Lodz, Russia 1910  42   - 58 Kantorowicz,Elza Bobruinsk, Minsk 1920  17  - 59 Kantorowicz,Ester Lodz, Russia 1910  10  - 60 Kantorowicz,Ester Koidano 1902  17   - 61 Kantorowicz,Ettel Natofhe 1905  30   - 62 Kantorowicz,Faiga Lapicz, Russia 1922  34   - 63 Kantorowicz,Feige Natofhe 1905  6  - 64 Kantorowicz,Feige Uzda 1901  8   - 65 Kantorowicz,Fejga Minsk, Poland 1921  29   - 66 Kantorowicz,Fejga Losza, Poland 1922  19   - 67 Kantorowicz,Fenvel Minsk, Russia 1914  38  - 68 Kantorowicz,Frade Bobrish 1907  20   - 69 Kantorowicz,Frome   1896  16   - 70 Kantorowicz,Frume Smilowicz, Russia 1910  16   - 71 Kantorowicz,Gala Slusk, Russia 1911  20  - 72 Kantorowicz,Gedalje Sokol 1901  15  - 73 Kantorowicz,Geo.   1896  40   - 74 Kantorowicz,Georg Harrogate, England 1913  57   - 75 Kantorowicz,George Harrogate England 1911  55   - 76 Kantorowicz,George Harrogate, England 1912  56   - 77 Kantorowicz,Gesie Bialostek 1907  18   - 78 Kantorowicz,Gettel Minsk , Russia 1913  18   - 79 Kantorowicz,Gisia Vilno, Pinsk Region 1922  18   - 80 Kantorowicz,Golda Dobczyce, Poland 1921  10   - 81 Kantorowicz,Golda Krakow, Poland 1923  37   - 82 Kantorowicz,Golde Kiow 1893  52   - 83 Kantorowicz,Guido Hodetz, Russia 1910  9  - 84 Kantorowicz,Henry   1893  60   - 85 Kantorowicz,Hensch Rogaczew 1907  40  - 86 Kantorowicz,Herman Posen, Germany 1910  24   - 87 Kantorowicz,Hinder Slusk, Russia 1911  50   - 88 Kantorowicz,Hugo Berlin 1903  46   - 89 Kantorowicz,Icek Wilno, Pinsk Region 1922  3   - 90 Kantorowicz,Ida Wilan 1892  8  - 91 Kantorowicz,Ide Rochel Muisk, Russia 1914  55  - 92 Kantorowicz,Iechok Zabludow, Poland 1921  9 - 93 Kantorowicz,Isaak Moleziad 1903  0   - 94 Kantorowicz,Isaak   1895  23   - 95 Kantorowicz,Isak   1896  23   - 96 Kantorowicz,Iser Dobczyce, Poland 1921  17  - 97 Kantorowicz,Israel Minsk, Poland 1921  4   - 98 Kantorowicz,Iszrael Wilno, Pinsk Region 1922  32   - 99 Kantorowicz,Ite Russia, Grodno 1914  20  - 100 Kantorowicz,Iwejra Bobruinsk, Minsk 1920  7  - 101 Kantorowicz,Jacob Berlin, Germany 1924  25   - 102 Kantorowicz,Jaiba Slutzk, Russia 1911  16  - 103 Kantorowicz,Jakob Lemberg, Austria 1910  22  - 104 Kantorowicz,Jakob Makowa 1900  33  - 105 Kantorowicz,Jankel Minsk, Russia 1907  14   - 106 Kantorowicz,Jankel   1892  51  - 107 Kantorowicz,Jaschke Natofhe 1905  15   - 108 Kantorowicz,Josef Moleziad 1903  25   - 109 Kantorowicz,Josif Borisow, Russia 1913  17   - 110 Kantorowicz,Jozef Rotterdam 1904  29   - 111 Kantorowicz,Karol Warsaw, Russia 1908  29   - 112 Kantorowicz,Krejna Uzdy, Poland 1921  12  - 113 Kantorowicz,Lea   1892  6  - 114 Kantorowicz,Lea Uzda 1901  6   - 115 Kantorowicz,Leib Osmene, Russia 1909  7  - 116 Kantorowicz,Leib Borisow 1904  26   - 117 Kantorowicz,Leike Kiew 1906  18  - 118 Kantorowicz,Leira Bialystok, Poland 1921  21  - 119 Kantorowicz,Leise Smilowitzi, Russia 1910  45  - 120 Kantorowicz,Leja Uzdy, Poland 1921  60  - 121 Kantorowicz,Lejba Minsk, Poland 1921  40  - 122 Kantorowicz,Liba Baranowice, Poland 1921  56   - 123 Kantorowicz,Liba Los, Russia 1922  35   - 124 Kantorowicz,Libe Koidinowa 1905  15   - 125 Kantorowicz,Liebe Uzdy 1906  20   - 126 Kantorowicz,Liebel Sokol 1901  3   - 127 Kantorowicz,Lipman Slutsk 1906  18  - 128 Kantorowicz,Many Moleziad 1903  24   - 129 Kantorowicz,Maria Ponice 1905  17   - 130 Kantorowicz,Marie   1893  60   - 131 Kantorowicz,Markus   1893  1  - 132 Kantorowicz,Mathilda   1906  59   - 133 Kantorowicz,Meier Lugi, Russia 1909  38   - 134 Kantorowicz,Mera Lapicz, Russia 1922  10   - 135 Kantorowicz,Meyer Smolewitz 1904  3  - 136 Kantorowicz,Michal Baranowicz 1902  3   - 137 Kantorowicz,Michla Minsk, Russia 1911  19   - 138 Kantorowicz,Mina Nowogrudek, Russia 1922  56  - 139 Kantorowicz,Mirel Bialystok, Poland 1921  23  - 140 Kantorowicz,Mirel Baranowicze, Poland 1922  22  - 141 Kantorowicz,Mischa Lapicz, Russia 1922  6  - 142 Kantorowicz,Morduch Uzdy, Poland 1921  14  - 143 Kantorowicz,Moritz Nowodwar 1900  29   - 144 Kantorowicz,Mosei Bialostok, Russia 1913  17   - 145 Kantorowicz,Nache Los, Russia 1922  7  - 146 Kantorowicz,Nani Borisaw, Russia 1913  17   - 147 Kantorowicz,Naska Taohowicz 1900  24   - 148 Kantorowicz,Nechame Minisk, Russia 1907  18 - 149 Kantorowicz,Nejech   1893  60   - 150 Kantorowicz,Nochem Kamin, Russia 1914  18   - 151 Kantorowicz,Noham Usda 1904  25  - 152 Kantorowicz,Oscher Minsk 1904  27  - 153 Kantorowicz,Rachel   1893  23   - 154 Kantorowicz,Rachel   1892  7   - 155 Kantorowicz,Rachel Suwathi, Poland 1923  16   - 156 Kantorowicz,Rafael Warschau 1897  23  - 157 Kantorowicz,Rasche Pleschwiz, Russia 1913  18  - 158 Kantorowicz,Rime Sewolki, Russia 1908  14  - 159 Kantorowicz,Ronia Nowodwar 1900  21   - 160 Kantorowicz,Rosalie Wilan 1892  42   - 161 Kantorowicz,Roza Kalisz, Poland 1922  29  - 162 Kantorowicz,Ruchla Baranowice, Poland 1921  9   - 163 Kantorowicz,Salman Minsk 1904  21   - 164 Kantorowicz,Salomon Russia 1908  26   - 165 Kantorowicz,Sara   1896  16  - 166 Kantorowicz,Sarah   1892  14   - 167 Kantorowicz,Schachne Baranowice, Poland 1921  11  - 168 Kantorowicz,Schaje Wozniesonsk, Russia 1910  22   - 169 Kantorowicz,Scheine Baranowicz 1902  0   - 170 Kantorowicz,Schloma Dokschitz, Russia 1911  35  - 171 Kantorowicz,Schmiel Bieljcerkow, Russia 1907  40  - 172 Kantorowicz,Schmierl Mensh, Russia 1907  19  - 173 Kantorowicz,Schmul Smolewitz 1904  6   - 174 Kantorowicz,Schnein   1893  5   - 175 Kantorowicz,Sima Bobruinsk, Minsk 1920  36   - 176 Kantorowicz,Sochar Pinsk, Poland 1923  20  - 177 Kantorowicz,Sofja Puchowiczi, Russia 1911  18   - 178 Kantorowicz,Sonia Uzdy, Poland 1921  17   - 179 Kantorowicz,Sonia Krakow, Poland 1923  2  - 180 Kantorowicz,Sore Slutzk, Russia 1911  47  - 181 Kantorowicz,Sroel Molczad, Russia 1912  30  - 182 Kantorowicz,Srol Uzdy, Poland 1921  6   - 183 Kantorowicz,Srul Borysow, Russia 1914  117  - 184 Kantorowicz,Srul Kiew 1906  18   - 185 Kantorowicz,Stefan Chabowka, Poland 1923  25   - 186 Kantorowicz,Szachne Dobczyce, Poland 1921  11   - 187 Kantorowicz,Szmaje Lemberg, Austria 1908  18  - 188 Kantorowicz,Szyfra Wilno, Pinsk Region 1922  27   - 189 Kantorowicz,Wolf Minsk, Poland 1921  6  - 190 Kantorowicz,Wulf Sludek, Russia 1913  31  - 191 Kantorowicz,Yankel Usda 1902  27  - 192 Kantorowicz,Yoche Saskewiczi, Russia 1914  17  - 193 Kantorowicz,Yose Smolewitz 1904  0  - 194 Kantorowicz,Ysrael   1904  32 -   195 Kantorowicz,Zelda Vilno, Pinsk Region 1922  54 - 196 Kantorowicz,Zelde Liverpool, England 1911  11 - 197 Kantorowicz,Zelse Usda, Russia 1907  52 
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- Wednesday, June 23, 2004 at 05:07:16 (EDT)
Dear Friends........ Last spring I asked Yuri Dorn, President of the URJC of Belarus, to create for me a map, a list and photos of all the tombstones in Rakov's cemetery. Tombstones were lifted and cleaned for this project. I have all the material and I am planning to donate it to JOWBR. I am sorry it takes me such a long time to go over the material and put it in JOWBR format, but hopefully I will do it this summer. Ruthie ------------------------------------- Searching; LIFSHITZ - Rakov, Belarus------ CHAIFETZ - Rakov, Belarus------ ROTHSTEIN - Rakov, Belarus------- MOVSHOV - Rakov, Belarus----- KALUZYNSKI - Czestochowa, Poland---- SZCZEKACZ - Czestochowa, Poland---- SZNAJDERMAN - Zawiercie, Bedzin, Poland--- SZTATLER - Olkusz, Poland
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- Wednesday, June 23, 2004 at 04:41:39 (EDT)
Oshmiany Jewish cemetery ------------------------------------ The Oshmiany Jewish 0rganization registered as none propfit organization whose registration number in Israel is 58-034-598-1, brought up the matter of restoring the CEMETETY with the town hall officials of Oshmiany. Their response was a very positive. All the expenses of the restoration have to be provide by our organization. We estimated the cost to run to about US$ 30,000. The evaluation was based on the offer provided by the President of the Union of Religious Jewish Congregation of Belarus Mr. Yuri Dorn. The expenses unclude: Cleanup and restoration of tombs, erect a memorial tomb from the broken toms pieces and a new fence around the cemetery. Our Organization approached former residents of Oshmiany to donate money for this important project.I regret to tell you that very few Oshmiany people survived the holocaust and they are old and poor.The sum so far collected is currently short of about US$ 14,500 in order to fulfill our obligation to carry out the restoration of the cemetery in Oshmiany. We need additional help. If nothing is done, the town hall of Oshmiany will build on the area of the cemetery, residential project. Please help us raise this amount to preserve and eliminate the complete destruction of the cemetery. Please send contributions on the name: "Organization 0f Oshmiany newcomers in Israel". Account Number 161550 to the following addresses. Address of the Oshmiany Organization Address of the bank Peled Chanan Bank "Hapoalim", branch 524 Ramat Efal Ramat Efal 52960 Ramat Efal 52960 ISRAEL ISRAEL Tel. +97236351493 E-mail: peledch@012.net.il Thanking you in advance Chairman of the organization Peled Chanan (Cepelunski)
click for Russian site about Oshmiany
- Tuesday, June 22, 2004 at 11:25:41 (EDT)
Subj: [litvaksig] Help Needed for Major Vilna District Project ----- The Vilna District Research Group is considering starting a new project that will require volunteers to help with fundraising, proofing of records, distribution to contributors, translation, etc. Knowledge of old Cyrillic and Hebrew alphabets is a plus, although not required. It is required that individuals can devote at least 2-4 hours per week on a regualr basis, depending upon the phase of the project. A critical mass of 8-10 individuals is required. In addition, we are also in need of some major contributors to help fund this project, which is based on Lithuanian vital records. Anyone interested in helping out should contact the group Coordinator,Joel Ratner--- Vilna District Research Group
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- Saturday, June 19, 2004 at 21:38:09 (EDT)
am a Christian Palestinian My name is Raymond Hiresh. My father was born in Jaffa, I was born in Beirut, and my son was born in France. I have watched your suffering for nearly 40 years on TV. First I was too young to understand, then I grew up and started understanding, and today, as a grown up, I dont understand again, it doesnt have to be. Israel is the right waybut youre going the wrong way. Those of you from the Diaspora had two good reasons to come back. The first is a spiritual one, given the significance of Israel to any Jew. The second is a cultural or social one, given that this is the land your ancestors lived on. So Israel was the right way. Like anyone could meet people on his way, Jews coming to Palestine met Palestinians, who wanted to live freely on their land. As holy as Israel is for Jews, Palestine is for Christians and Muslims, and especially for Palestinian Christians and Muslims. There was a choice: either we walk the way and live together, or each of us walks on his lane. It is the latter choice which was favored. Those who didnt accept, fought against it, but it prevailed. From there on you started going the wrong the way. To make your dream come true, some decided that you had to get rid of Palestinians. Like someone who wants to have a swimming pool in his garden and decides to uproot a century old tree, you decided to uproot the Palestinians. Worse, they decided to eliminate any trace of our existence, the worst crime that could be done to a people, except for It is not demolishing homes or destroying villages we are talking about. It is the history and culture of millions of individuals. Destroying their identity. As unfair as forcing a Jew to hide or change his religion. You didnt decide to fight just those who wanted to return. You decided to take more. And the more you took, the more Palestinians you had in your way. And now we start hearing people talking about deporting those who stayed (based on whatever administrative fault they have committed)and words as demographic problem, as if the Jewish People wants to live without memory, and had none. I would understand much of Mans acts when his animal nature takes over, seeking revenge or acting by fear. But no. You dont have this alibi. All you are doing is programmed. It is prepared. It is calculated. And remember: doing well something bad is still bad. And you will be judged based on the worst you did, not the best you could do later. Like a man who abuses a child and then gives him sweets: would you say he is a good man? What I fear most is not that we, Palestinians, loose our fathers who link us to our history, but that you loose your fathers, those who wanted to leave the hatred behind and live in peace, who didnt come to inflict the horror of hatred on others. Youve left the right path before, but you were able to come back on the right way. I am confident you can do so today. It is not too late. Many errors can still be repaired. Understand us first It is time to make the effort to understand our fathers, and to understand us. You have lived over 50 years with many lies, such as the Palestinians left their land, the Palestinians didnt exist, Palestine was a desert, etc. It is time to unveil the truth. Not to us, we know it. Not to the world, who knows it too (even if you try remove the word Palestine from here or there). It is time to unveil it to your children. They will never understand the Palestinians until you tell them. It is the first step to our reconciliation. Because once they know that Palestinians, who are today in the Gaza desert (or strip) lived on the land you took, that Palestinians had planted and taken care of the trees that give the famous Jaffa oranges for centuries, they will start understanding. Let them visit our camps to talk to the children and ask them where their fathers lived (remember, some of them are third generation refugees, they and their fathers were born in these camps). We have sacrificed a lot, not you You often show what you did over the last fifty years. You often show how Palestinians were fifty years back. Explain to your children that there were poor Jews too at that time, and that they were as human as Palestinians are. But while you were free to build, we were under occupation surviving from day to day, going to school if you allowed us, getting water whenever you had enough, prevented from construction unless , and so forth. When your children realize that we had to give up a major part of our homeland, and later some more, up to the 1967 borders, they will realize that the Palestinians have made a very big sacrifice. Being now in the West Bank enclave and the Gaza desert is not much: Im sure you wouldnt trade, or would you? And trading is not taking both, it is exchanging! Tell them the truth, then send them maybe they would have more respect, and some admiration in our way of confronting hardship. Concerning fighting I will be short, because I will leave the answer to you: what would you do if we take over the whole region from Tel- Aviv/Jaffa up to entire Jerusalem, and put you under the same living conditions you put us? If the whole world watched and just expressed disagreement of our occupation, but did nothing? If the world would send us weapons and money to put you in ghettos, within high walls and barbed wire? Would you negotiate? Wouldnt you fight? How? Would simply throw stones, ? Let those who know your history tell others how you fought. If security is the only reason of your aggression, then let us help you. Because we can give you more than security. We can give you more than Peace and Security You always judge us on what we have become, after 55 years of occupation, or on what we could do in despair. Why not try to look forward, to how we could become when our conditions change, when our encounters are not only on military barricades? Why not look how we could become when we have hope for our children? In war time generals lead the troops, and people follow those who know how to fight, build shelters and high walls. In peace times entrepreneurs, politicians and intellectuals lead the troops, and people follow prosperity, hope and freedom. You want battles with generals, then make war, intolerance and insecurity. You want free trade, investments creating employment and spreading prosperity, Jews praying freely in Synagogues from India to Morocco, families dancing on each others music, tasting each others food specialties, then help us build a new Palestine, a Palestine which will welcome you. For a prosperous State of Palestine will relief Israel of all its nightmares. Palestine is your solution, the best and only one. Raymond Hiresh Paris, France June 19, 2004 Raymond@JerusalemPalestine.com
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- Saturday, June 19, 2004 at 08:11:49 (EDT)
Was looking for an e-mail address to contact you since you are looking for Kunin's. You have my family on one of your pages down in surprisingly complete detail. I'd be interested in where you got so much detailed information (From ancestry.com) although I believe my father, Samuel, was born in 1898, not 1896 as you state. Someone in Massachusetts, David Lubin, descendent on my grandmother's side, did a geneology and I probably could connect you if you are interested. I believe a great grandfather or great great grandfather had two wives and several children with each. I believe my mother came from one line, my father from the other. You have a very interesting site. Thanks Ed Kunin http://www.egalite.com/
http://www.egalite.com/
- Wednesday, June 16, 2004 at 22:23:03 (EDT)
Please direct any general enquiries to the author: dovidkatz@vilniusuniversity.net DOVID KATZ'S UNFINISHED STORY OF YIDDISH (IN PRESS) The Vilnius Yiddish Institute at Vilnius University is proud to announce that Professor Dovid Katz's Words on Fire: The Unfinished Story of Yiddish (Basic Books, New York), is in production and will soon be available. At present, it can be pre-ordered at a 32% discount from Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0465037283) and is available from other major booksellers. A description of the book is available at the Amazon site. Dr Peter Arnold
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- Monday, June 14, 2004 at 21:10:21 (EDT)
August 2004 Heritage Tour ( 17/08/04 - 28/08/04 ). A delegation is being organized to Dolhinov to inaugurate the two newly built Memorial Sites. They have just recently been completed as part of the DOLHINOV JEWISH CEMETERY PROJECT. Both Memorials are built the mass graves of the massacred Jews of Dolhinov, one at the Jewish Cemetery and second about 250 m from it in the open field. One full day of the tour is devoted to Dolhinov. The day will start with the "HASKARA" ceremony at the Memorial Sites. We will meet the Mayor of town. We'll visit the local high school and, at the request of its Principal, present the school library with newly acquired books about the Holocaust and the Jewish People History. The Heritage tour will last 11 days, 6 days in Belarus and 5 days in Lithuania. We will visit various imported places connected to Jewish Heritage and History, among others Minsk, Mir, Volozhin, Novogrudok, Nesvizh, Myadel, Naroch, Rakov, Oshmiany and others in Belarus and Vilnius, Kaunas, Trakai, Keidainiai, Druskininkai in Lithuania. The package tour provides 4* hotels with bred and breakfast, fully attached air-conditioned couch, Hebrew and English speaking Guide, farewell dinners with folk shows in Belarus and Lithuania. People interested to join the tour may contact: Leon Rubin, e-mail address: rubinlj@netvision.net.il Tel: 03-63564669 Israel.
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- Saturday, June 12, 2004 at 19:41:54 (EDT)
Eilat Gordin Levitan, I liked very much to see your site, which includes the Gurevich family. Congratulations! I'm a descendant of the Gurevich family, too. My grandmother, Sheva/Sophia/Sonia (née Gurevich) Aisen, lived in Lugansk, Ekaterinoslav Gubernia/Ukraine. In 1912 she immigrated with her husband Pinchus/Pavel Aisen and children to Brazil. I found in the photographs of your site some faces that looked like persons of my family. I can't proof that we're from the same family, but I suspect that we might be. I have a photo album which I invite you and your family to see in the following URL: http://www.geocities.com/elianaaizim/photo2.html Looking forward to hearing from you. Regards, Eliana Aizim from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil paste; http://www.geocities.com/elianaaizim/photo2.html ----or Click for The Gurevich /Aisen family of Brazil
http://www.geocities.com/elianaaizim/photo2.html
- Saturday, June 12, 2004 at 13:02:07 (EDT)
We will be leaving on 22nd for Lithuania and Belarus. Ms. Toma Omeljanchuk will be our guide from the Jewish Museum in Vilnius to the towns in Belarus. Is there anyone that we should contact or look up when we arrive in Krasnoye? We will probably be there on the 28th, June. By the way-I have tried to view the movies on your site but cannot despite having quicktime-?? I don't know why. Gail Gordon Haymovitz
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- Saturday, June 12, 2004 at 12:53:27 (EDT)
Some notes of what Eli Graber told me; my grandfather; rabbi Eliyahu Garber was the rabbi of Horodok for about thirty years (c 1910- 1940) and he appears in the movie with his wife; Rachel nee Leibovitz of Sluzk. (Rachel was the sister of Rav Baruch Berl Leibovitz of Sluzk who was known as the Rabbi of Hlusk From http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/bobruisk/byb764.html Bobruisk Yizkor book (Pages 764- 771) ...There were two rabbis in Hlusk: Rav Baruch Berl, the Hassidic rabbi, who later became, I heard, the head * of Slabodka Yeshiva... 'Memories of Hlusk by Yakov Lipshits (Yid.) * He was the "Mashgiach Ruchani" (spiritual leader) of the second Slobodka Yeshiva (not the alter; Nosson Zvi (Nota Hirsh) Finkels' mussar yeshiva. He was influenced by Rabbi Soloveitchik who was not "mussarnik". The second Slobodka Yeshiva was established by Rav Zvi Hirsh Rabinowitz (son of Rav Yitzchak Elchanan Spektor, the rabbi of Kovno. He named the yeshiva for his father) Rabbi Eliyahu Garber and his wife had five children; Son Zalman died at a young age from appendicitis (c 1938, he was a Yeshiva student when he died -you could see him in the 1930 movie) The beutiful girl who is seen a few times in the movie is Chyena nee Garber who later married Rabbi Kossovski and immigrated to South Africa before the war R. Chaim Ozer Grodzensky was a relative of Rabbi Kosovski. The two other sisters as well as their husbands who were Yeshiva students were able to get visas to Shanghai, a month later they were joined by their brother; Rabbi Israel Garber. He could not get a visa since he became a Lithuanian citizen and only refugees received Visas. After the Soviets stopped him in Vladivastok he sent a telegram to Rabbi Kalmanovitz, who was heping bring the Yeshiva boys to Shanghai. They Escape from Poland through Soviet Union to Japan and China. Rabbi Avraham Kalmanovitch (the rabbi of Horodok during the first world war) the rabbi got in touch with Joseph Shapiro, the son of Dovid Shapiro of Horodok who arranged papers for Israel to go to Japan. Rabbi Eliyahu Garber and his wife Rachel perished in Vilna. Dates; October 26, 1939 - Vilna and its environs are transferred from Soviet to Lithuanian control; from September 1939 through early 1940 more than 15,000 Polish Jews flee to Lithuania, mostly to Vilna, to escape Nazi persecution and Soviet domination; June 15, 1940 - Soviet troops occupy Lithuania   July 26-August 2, 1940 - Acting on de Deckers authorization, Zwartendijk issues approximately 2,400 pseudo destination visas for entry into the Dutch West Indies; Zwartendijks operation is shut down when the Soviets seize his Philips office on August 2, 1940, as part of a large nationalization campaign; ·   July 11-August 31, 1940 - Japanese consul to Lithuania, Chiune Sugihara, issues more than 2,100 transit visas, mostly to Polish Jewish refugees holding Zwartendijk visas and wishing to flee eastward; ·   August 4, 1940 - Soviets officially annex Lithuania and order all diplomatic consulates closed by August 25, 1940 (later changed to September 4); ·   August 16, 1940 - The first small groups of refugees begin arriving in Japan; a few hundred will arrive by the end of 1940; ·   September 4, 1940 - Japan closes its consulate in Kaunas, Lithuania. Sugihara leaves post in Lithuania for his new post in Prague; October 6, 1940 - American Ambassador Lawrence Steinhardt in Moscow alerts Washington to the 2,000 visas recently issued in Kaunas for transit en route to Dutch possessions in the Americas, with concern that the real intention of visa recipients is to enter the U.S.;   January-February 1941 - Hundreds of Polish Jewish refugees, most with Sugihara and Zwartendijk visas, leave Lithuania via the Trans-Siberian railway and begin arriving in Japan; ·   February 28, 1941 - In response to request from Japanese Foreign Ministry, Sugihara sends list of 2,139 persons to whom he issued transit visas from Lithuania; ·   May 1941 - Avant garde Tanpei Photography club photographs of Polish-Jewish refugees are exhibited at the Osaka Asahi Kaikan in exhibition entitled "Wandering Jew"; ·   June 22, 1941 - German invasion of the Soviet Union in the massive "Operation Barbarossa"; mass shootings of Jews by Nazis and their collaborators begin in Lithuania; ·   Fall 1941 - With the impending threat of war, the Japanese move nearly 1,000 Polish Jewish refugees stranded in Kobe to Shanghai, China, then under Japanese control;   February 18, 1943 - Japanese order all "stateless refugees," including Jewish refugees from Poland, Lithuania, Germany, and Austria, into "designated area" of Shanghai; 1947 - Sugihara returns to U.S.-occupied Japan and is retired from Japanese Foreign Ministry as part of larger staff reduction; because of a lack of funds and visas, most refugees do not leave Shanghai until 1947. The old shochet's  name is Dovid Mordechai Eidelman. his son took over the shechita duties when the father aged, his name was Hirsh, and he had a son Mattes, they were Slonimer chasidim and they appear in the movie, as well as the young son of Mattes who is also in the movie (playing with a toy pulled by a string) .
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- Friday, June 11, 2004 at 03:11:30 (EDT)
Thanks for getting back to me. I spoke to my father and he is willing to speak to you about Horodok. he has many corrections to the material on the website. the old shochet's  name is Dovid Mordechai Eiedelman. his son took over the shechita duties when the father aged, his name was Hiirsh, and he had a son Mattes, they were Slonimer chasidim and they appear in the movie. my grandfather rabbi Eliyahu Garber was the rabbi and he appears as well in the movie with his family.
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- Thursday, June 10, 2004 at 18:23:59 (EDT)
please correct the horodok site where on the page about the movie that my father Israel Garber has , you identify his father(my grandfather) rabbi Eliyahu Garber as the shochet. this is wrong he was the last rabbi of horodok . please contact me about this, father who escaped and survived the war is living now in nyc, im in brooklyn, ny thanks for your great work. for the movie go to;
http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/horodok/h_pages/h_movies.html
- Wednesday, June 09, 2004 at 13:06:28 (EDT)
Krigers In Linkova in 1834 KRIGER Izrael son of Beniamin died in 1831 at a very old age KRIGER Abram son of Izrael born in 1800 wife KRIGER Reizel their sons ; 1. KRIGER Gershon born in 1818 2. KRIGER David born in 1822 Their daughters; 3. KRIGER Tsipe born in 1825 4. KRIGER Gente born in 1828 KRIGER Fishel Veivel son of Izrael Head of Household died 1831  Son 1. KRIGER Perets born in 1796 his wife; KRIGER Khaike KRIGER Zavel Perets and Khaike 's son born 1819 KRIGER Girsh Perets and Khaike 's son born 1822 KRIGER Sore Perets and Khaike 's daughter born; 1825 KRIGER Dvere Perets and Khaike 's daughter born; 1828 KRIGER Khane Perets and Khaike 's daughter born 1833 Son 2. KRIGER Beniamin born in 1801 (later put with another family to avoid the army) others; KRIGER Shmuilo Gershon Head of Household KRIGER Kasriel Orel Son 18  KRIGER, Shmuel    buildings worth 150 rubles Real Estate Owners    1910  Vaskai Panevezys Kaunas  is he the same as; KRIGER, Shmuel Kusel   Bolshaya Tyuremnaya St. Real Estate Taxpayers    1912-1916  Siauliai Siauliai Kaunas  KRIGER / SLUTSKY, Notel    Trade; Petit Bourgeois; 2 in family Box Taxpayers    1892  Panevezys Panevezys Kaunas  KRA/I-49/1/17524 809 107 
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- Tuesday, June 08, 2004 at 01:36:11 (EDT)
I have been trying to research my Granfathers family, I am 46 years old and my grandfather Nathan (Nusan) Lipshitz was born in Vileyka in 1898 or so to Sara and Nechemia Lipshitz, he immigrated to New York about 1918 and married my grandmother Rose (Rochel Gittel) Miller of Vilna. They had one child, my mother Selma (Shayna Yenta). She passed away in 1994.He had several siblings, I only remember an Aunt Anna (Chana). If you can help please contact me. Thank you . Organizete@aol.com  Susan  Sara Horwitz http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/vileyka/vil_pix/vilp_34_b.gif picture of the Lipshitz family members who perished in Vileika
http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/vileyka/vil_pix/vilp_34_b.gif
- Tuesday, June 01, 2004 at 04:25:34 (EDT)
Old notes from the belarus sig about Smorgon---- I am just beginning to investigate my family tree, and have put together enough information to know that both sides come from Belarus. The towns are Smorgon and Soly. They are basically east of Vilna on the Belarus side of the border. Smorgon was the more substantial place and appears on current maps. Soly is in the shtetl finder at JewishGen, but I cant get a map location. Can anyone give me a bit of a heads up on how to get started? I am at a loss to trace names, since the family names are reported to have been created during the immigration process: GROSS, CRAMER, WITTENBERG are a few. How does one get a look at a Yizkor book? One exists for Smorgon. Thanks for your help.--------------------------------------------------Regarding Michael Gross's posting regarding Smorgon:My family is also from Smorgon. I would also be interested in anything pertaining to that town, especially it's history and Yizkor book. Thanks for your help.Michael Trapunsky Rego Park, NY----------------------------------There is a town spelled Smorgon located in Belarus. It is northwest of Minsk, roughly equidistant from Minsk and Vilna and spelled Smarhon on modern maps. Oshmyany sounds alot like Osmanya which is a town mentioned by my family which comes from Smorgon, Belarus. Please get in touch with me-----------------------------------. Dear Belarus SIG:The Oshmiany Research Group of the LitvakSIG has already acquired and partially translated 1858 Revision List records for the Oshmiany District. In the mid 19th Century Oshmiany was one of the four districts that were part of Vilna Guberniya, that later became part of Belarus, and their records were accessible at the Vilnius State Historical Archives. Most of the expenses for the purchase and translation of these records have been covered by this group, but more help is needed. The data is going to be part of a mid-19th Century census of Lithuania based primarily on revision and family lists, supplemented by other kinds of genealogical records. The LitvakSIG is a JewishGen hosted SIG and the "All Lithuania" Database will be accessible to everyone. Discussions are underway for joint sponsorship by Belarus SIG and the LitvakSIG of research groups for Disna, Lida, and Vileika uyezds in which the data will be accessible thru both the LitvakSIG's "All Lithuania" database and a similar database for the Belarus SIG.The towns of Oshmiany Uyzed include:1) Oshmiany, 2)Nalibokoye(Nalibotz),3) Vishnevo, 4) Volozhin, 5) Dereviany, 6) Devenishki, 7) Zhuprany, 8) Zaskeviche, 9) Ivoye, 10) Krevo, 11) Lipnishki, 12) Solsk, 13) Smorgon, 14) Traby, 15) Golshany.Revision Lists are among the most important and valuable genealogical documents we can obtain. They list every member of the Jewish community, on a shtetl by shtetl basis within each household. These census's were made for purposes of taxation and conscription and clearly show all of the people who resided in a household: the head of household, father's name age and all the relationships between members of a family, Additional data is provided, noting any change in status of a personal which had taken place since the last revision, eight years before. And since additional notes were made for a number of years after 1858 on the same Revision List, we have a lot of information about what happened to people over a period of 10 or 12 years (and sometimes more). These notes include information about death, conscription, moving away (and sometimes where to) and various court actions, all with dates.Separate lists were kept for workers, merchants, craftsmen and artisans (in some cases) and notes are added when this status changed.Because our ancestors moved around a lot, to marry, to be educated, find jobs, to trade - looking at an entire district instead of a single town is valuable. You can also track women who married and were thereafter listed under their husband's or husband's father's household, and also note men who married into a family and for some reason chose to take the bride's surname. So with Revision Lists for uyezds we can discover many more ancestors, and learn more about them than would otherwise be possible in any other way. You will almost certainly be able to find ancestors in several different shtetls within the district.If you are interested in joining this research group and helping complete the project, please contact one of the three Oshmiany coordinators. With your help the remaining records can be translated and will be available on the Internet very quickly.David Hoffman & Davida Noyek Handler Co-Coordinators, LitvakSIG Eric Goldstein Research Group Coordinator Please contact:Samuel A. Arutt Cliff Karchmer, Joanne Saltman Oshmiany Research Group Co-CoordinatorsMODERATOR'S NOTE: I would like to thank David Hoffman, Davida Handler, and Eric Goldstein for posting this most informative message. Because of the changing borders in eastern Europe, many of the SIGS have overlapping geographic areas of interest. As a result, it is in the best interests of everyone that the SIGs cooperate in research efforts that benefit their fellow researchers. I will be working with the Litvak SIG in efforts to share information and include data from overlapping areas in both the All Litvak Database (ALD) and the All Belarus Database (ABD).The current issue of AVOTAYNU (Vol. CIV, No.3, Fall 1998) has an excellent article by Boris Feldyblyum title, "Russian Revision Lists: A History". This is must reading for anyone researching Belarus or any other areas that were once part of the Russian Empire.David Fox fox@erols.com Belarus SIG Coordinator >There is a town spelled Smorgon located in Belarus. It is northwest of Minsk, >roughly equidistant from Minsk and Vilna and spelled Smarhon on modern maps. >Oshmyany sounds alot like Osmanya which is a town mentioned by my family which >comes from Smorgon, Belarus. >Please get in touch with me. > In Melbourne there is a Smoron Family - very large and wealthy - who I think goes from that villiage - Smorgon Industries David Frey---------------------------------- I am excited! Yesterday, just before the Seder, someone from Soros brought me a package from Valentina containing four books. Because I cannot read Russian, I cannot tell you the titles of all of them but I can describe. Valentina wrote translations in strategic places in one. 1. A 286 page book that starts with what must be a history of all of Belarus of 104 pages, illustrated with various seals. P. 105 begins the one page or more of histories (from at least 1252 for some towns) for the following towns: Odelsk, Ostrolenka, Ostrino, Auvgustav, Oshmiany, Baranavichi, Bobruisk, Borisov, Belostok, Belaya, Belitsa, Bely, Belsk, Bobr, Bransk-Podlyaski, Bransk-Severski, Braslav, Byjov, Brest, Vasilkov, Volkovysk, Vidzy, Vizuny, Vileika, Vilno, Vitebsk, Vein, Volpa, Vyzna, Vysokoe, Velizh, Gorodnoe (Grodnaya), Gorodok, Geronejny, Gomel, Gonedj, Grodno, Gorki, David-Gorodok, Dorogobush, Disna, Dvinsk, dokshitsy, Drogichin, Druga, Drisa, Dubrovo, Duhovchina, Elnya, Zhirovichi, Zabludov, Igumen, Kamenets, Kopyl, Karitsin, Kletsak, Klimovichi, Kleshcheli, Knyshin, Kobrin Gorodets, Kodzenj, Kolna, Kopys, Krasny, Krinki, Krichev, Kreva, Kuznitsa, Lapshin, Lomazy, Lepel, Lida, Lipnishki, Lipsk, Lomzha, Lubcha, Mogilev, Mozyr, Malech, Mglin, Meishagola, Melnik, Minsk, Mileishitsy, Mihalova, Mstislav, Novogrudok, Novoybkov, Novoe Mesto, Narva, Nevelj, Novy Grod, Novy Dvor, Nezvizh, Orlya, Orsha, Pagar, Porechje, Postavy, Perebrode, Pinsk, Polatsk, Porozovo, Pruzhany, Pryvalka, Preroslj, Peschank, Rogachev, Radoshkavichy, Radun, Raigorad, Roslav, Rhuzany, Rechitsa, Sokulka, Sabotskin, Sventsyny, Sebezh, Seiny, Slavatichki, Slonim, Slutsk, Smolensk, Starodub, Suvalki, Surazh, Surazh-Podlyatsiski, Surazh-Severski, Suhavolya, Senno, Troki, Ugorje, Ula, Ushachi, Filipov, Tsehanovets, Tsirin, Charvlisy, Cherikov, Sherishovo, Sklov, Schuchin, Shuchin-Mazovetski, Yaluvka, Yanov. That section ends at page 258. 2 pages I can't read. p. 262-281: official seals. 282-3: index. 284-5, a bibliography. cannot read remaining few. Back cover: map with every town that had an official seal.2. Tselesh, Viachka: Towns of Belarus on Told-Time Postcards published in Minsk in 1998. captions of photos in "sort of "English but text in Russian. Evidently, the archives has a huge collection of old postcards, too large to fit in the 255 page book. List of towns that I can figure out: village of Tryshyn, now Brest; Asipovichy, Babruisk, Baranavichy, Barysau, Brest, Vaukavusk, Vileika, Glusk, Glybokaye, Gomel, Gorke, Grodna, Dzisna, Dobrush, Drysa, Zhlobin, Kobryn, Krychau, Lepel, Lida, Magilyou, Minsk, Mstsislau, Navagrudak, Nyasvizh, Orsha, Pastavy, Pinsk, Polatsk, Ragachou, Rechitsa, Svislach, Slonim, slutsk, Smargon, Shchuchyn, 3. Belarus, A Story of Change. published Minsk 1998, ISBN: 985-6168-01-5 and ISBN 985-09-0315-5, editor: V.K. Kasko. This one is like to books you find in hotel rooms for various cities. Lots of glossy color photos and Lukashenko propoganda, a lot of flora and fauna, artists, etc.: photos are mostly of churchs: Gomel, Polotsk, Novogrudok, Belaya Bezha in Kamenets, Smorgon, Nezvizh, Zaslavl, Minsk, 4.All in Russian, 11"x12" book of 33 pages of all sorts of maps and the following: (The only thing in English): The Atlas "The Byelorussian" is a first attempt to show a development of the Byelorussian ethnos from end of XIX century to beginning of 90's of XX century. Maps were made on the basis of the authentic data of the censuses of the population from 1897, 1926, 1939, 1970, 1959, 1970. 1979, 1989, and the current statistics of 1990's. .. maps urban and rural popuations, changes is sex-age structure, education, ETHNIC GROUPS: Russians, Ukrainians, Jewry, Pole...religion, Well, Amy can read Russian but this is a huge amount to translate. Do we have any other Russian readers among us? Obviously, I will share the non- Grodno information with Belarus SIG. Ellen Renck, ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Subject: Re: Svir, Smorgon and Sarkovschina On Feb.3,04 Mario Konig (m_xenize@hotmail.com) sent a message asking in part about the above towns.If Mr. Konig would go to www.jewishgen.org, and use the "search this website" box, on the upper right hand side of the page, and do separate searches for each of his towns' names, he will be able to click on a number of websites for Svir., incluind a sketch of the town's history, and a revision list from 1858.My old Columbia-Lippincott Gazetteer (C-L) says of Svir only that in 1939 it had a population of over 500, that it is in the Molodechno oblast, located on the Svir river, 45 miles east northeast of Vilna. There were fisheries and lumbering was done. My older edition of "Where We Once Walked" (WWOW) says of Svir (Shvir, Svyriai, Swir) that it is 133 kilometers northwest of Minsk. No mention is made of its pre-WWII Jewish population. There are two yizkor books for Svir ""Irtanu Svir" 1959, and "Gevon Amol a Shtetele Svir," 1975." Perhaps Mr. Konig can find copies in a library in Israel.Using the "search this website" box will also pull up a shtetlink page for Smorgon. In one of the online Belarus newsletters, Mr. Konig can also read some description of Smorgon and its history in an article written by the noted writer Ilya Ehrenburg on the Holocaust in Belarus.The C-L says of Smorgon that in 1931 it had a population of 4,090. It is located in the central Molodechno oblast, near the Viliya River, 45 miles southeast of Vilna. It was an agricultural processing center, known for linen, wool, hide, and hops, sawmilling, and brick manufacturing. It has the ruins of a 16th century church. in 1893 it passed from Poland to Russia, reverted to Poland in 1921 and ceded to the USSR in 1945. WWOW says of Smorgon ("Smorgonie," :Smurainaiah," that it had a pre-WW II Jewish population of 2,000, and that it is 107 kilometers west northwest of Minsk. There is yizkor book for Smorgon, Smrgon Machuz Vilna, 1965. The "search this website" box didn't result in a place called Sarkovshchina, but two articles on Volozhin, Belarus appeared which mention in passing the name "Sakovshchina." It was a hamlet which did milling, and was not very far from Volozhin.WWOW says of Sharkovshchina (also spelled as "Sakovchizna," "Sharkoyshchina," "Szarkowszczyzna") says that its pre-WW II Jewish population was 615. The C-L says that Sharkovshchina that in 1939 it had a population of over 500., located in the central Polotsk oblast, on the Disna RIver, 19 miles north northwest of Glubokoye. It was known for gruit gardening, ryn, flax and potatoes. (The C-L doesn't mention flourmilling, however, but mony shtetls had flour mills.)Mr. Kogin should also type in separately the variants of his family names in the "search this website" box to see what those searches will produce, and also have a look in Jewishgen's Discussion Group Archives for those surnames.He also should look for his towns typing in all their spelling variants using the google search engine at www.google.com. Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN) Bloomington, Indiana
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~siglists
- Sunday, May 30, 2004 at 22:57:41 (EDT)
In an old address book, used by my husband's grandmother when she came to America, there is an address for Abrams & Dratch, Water Street, New Bedford, MA.    I have already searched the NB City Directories from 1909 until 1931 and the US Census for 1920 and 1930.  There was indeed a Benjamin & Fannie DRATCH, and a few years later Samuel & Lena ABRAMS. They were all part of the Abrams & Dratch Dry Goods / Department Store.  I have also checked the JGFF and FTJP with no connections. If anyone has any information about these families, please contact me.   There is also an address for a Max PINCUS in Brooklyn who was either a brother of Abrams or Dratch, or their wives, since there is a side note in Yiddish saying, "Etta's children."  Any information about this person would also be helpful.   I assume these families came from Oshmiany and the Vilna area of what was then Poland and then Lithuania.  However, they may have come from other areas. Channah Gordon
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- Sunday, May 30, 2004 at 12:20:41 (EDT)
Dear Eilat, RE: IRVING BUNIM (was BUNIMOWITZ) Born in: Volozhin, Belarus (in S.Molodechno Oblast), Russia. Irving's son, Amos, wrote his biography as the book titled "A Fire In His Soul: Irving M. Bunim 1901-1980: The Man and His Impact on American Orthodox Jewry". It is published by Feldheim. Irving delivered riveting lectures on Pirkei Avos which were later published in book form entitled "Ethics from Sini" published by Feldheim, 1964. -------------------------------------------------------- The following (until the line) is quoted from the flier/order form for the book "A Fire in His Soul": In the annals of American Jewry, one name stands out as the foremost lay leader of the Orthodox community: Irving Bunim. Born in Volozhin, Lithuania, and raised in New York in a home steeped in Jewish values and tradition, Bunim dedicated his life to furthering Orthodox Judaism and Jewish education. He was renowned for him humor and humility, his diligence and devotion, and his unflagging support for his fellow Jews the world over. In the post-Depression era, the youthful, dynamic Bunim left his indelible mark on Young Israel, the nascent Orthodox synagogue movement whose roots were in his Lower East Side neighborhood. There he delivered riveting lectures on Pirkei Avos and organized youth activities. A charismatic and inspiring speaker, he succeeded in repelling the forces of assimilation which threatened to engulf the local Jewish youth and alienate them from their heritage. Young Israel became a springboard for Bunim's World War II activities. Together with Rabbi Aaron Kotler, he built Vaad Hatzala into an ambitious rescue organization for victims of the Holocaust. Already a public speaker of note, he argued effectively for an increase in US immigration quotas, and battled American indifference to the plight of Europe's Jews, publicizing Nazi atrocities, fundraising indefatigably, and even negotiating with the Nazis to ransom Jewish lives. With the rescue of tens of thousands to his credit, Bunim turned his attention to Jewish education. His support was instrumental in the development of the Rabbi Jacob Joseph School and the founding of the Beth Medrash Govoha -- the prestigious Lakewood Yeshiva. He championed the cause of Torah Umesorah in America and Chiuch Atzmai in Israel, organizations which have created far-reaching networks of religious elementary schools, thereby providing a solid and lasting foundation for the education of future generations. Irving Bunim's achievements for American Orthodox Jewry in particular, and for world Jewry in general, were unequaled. This superb biography and historical document, written by his son, is a fitting tribute to the resourceful, uncompromising, indomitable man whose impact will continue to be felt long after his passing. ----------------------------------------------- -Kenneth
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- Saturday, May 29, 2004 at 13:04:05 (EDT)
I have recently found my grandfather's "petition for naturalization", his "declaration of intention" and his "oath of allegiance" papers. His name was Barney Edelstein - born in Weliony, Russia on December 19, 1881. I found this page by trying to find information on Weliony. He arrived in New York on September 14, 1907 on the vessel "Lucania". I would appreciate any information. everocks@aol.com- Eve Altman
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- Saturday, May 29, 2004 at 13:02:31 (EDT)
hello and a good day,-- I was searching my family name (Shtaingold or Shteingold) in google and I found your site and Shteingold was in it. I know that there are not many with this family name here in Israel and I was wondering about the history of my family (I know that they came from Vilna region or something like that). can you help me ? do you have information about steingold? thanks in advance, Eyran Shtaingold. eyrans@hotmail.com Chelvana (son of Efraim Yosef Shteingold) with wife Zirale (daughter of Shmuel Zilberglite) and children; Avraham, Hillel and Etka (Ester) perished in Krivichi, Vilna region, in 1942. Two of Chelvana and Zirale children survived; Zahava Slobodsky (Zlatka nee Shteingold) came to Israel before the war. She gave the pictures of her family (it is in the chapter she wrote in the Krivichi Yizkor book; "From days of dark and horrors") Her brother Yosef Shteingold, went to South Africa at age 15. Pictures of the family; http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/krivichi/kriv_pix/krep6_b.gif ----- http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/krivichi/kriv_pix/kre8_b.gif-------
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- Friday, May 28, 2004 at 15:01:45 (EDT)
http://www.time.com/time/generations/article/0,9171,1101040531-641131-1,00.html -The current, May 31, 2004, issue of Time Magazine has an article on JewishGen's Yizkor Book Project. ---- Called "Books of Life, the article is available online at: http://www.time.com/time/generations/article/0,9171,1101040531-641131-1,00.html ------------- I am pasting some of it here; ...Some bitter and mournful, others folksy, the manuscripts lay abandoned. Who could find them, buried in attics and special libraries? Who could read their Yiddish? And so these Yizkor (or memory) books written as requiems to entire Jewish communities extinguished by World War II were nearly forgotten. After all, few of the Holocaust survivors who memorialized the dead were professional writers. The more than 1,200 texts they wrote chronicle the sad years of genocide and often the decades, even centuries, before. Their accounts, typically printed in limited press runs, adapted a Jewish tradition from the late 13th century of recording pogrom victims. Today these books are becoming more widely read, thanks to a small army of Jewish-history buffs. In 1997 volunteers started to secure copyright permissions, translate the volumes and publish them online in a centralized place. The Yizkor Book Project website, www.jewishgen.org/yizkor, is making these books available in English for the first time. Also Translated: descriptions of lost communities compiled by Israel's Holocaust museum Yad Vashem. The website boasts 584 entries describing some 450 disappeared communities, listed from A to Z, with 9,096 graphic images. A searchable database of necrologies retrieves different spellings of family names. The re-creation on the Internet of the Jewish shtetls of Central and Eastern Europe has been orchestrated largely by volunteer dynamo Joyce Field of West Lafayette, Ind. After retiring in 1994, Field, a former human-resources manager for software firms, purchased a computer and helped a cousin research their family history. Separately, a newly discovered relative involved with the genealogy website JewishGen enlisted Field to arrange Yizkor-book translations for their family's use. Before she knew it, Field, at 65, had become full-time manager of the Yizkor Book Project for JewishGen. Says Field: "Whereas Hitler tried to obliterate the memory of Jewish contributions to European history, these books confront the lie."Website visitors who logged 1.9 million impressions in 2003 include Jewish family-history devotees as well as East Europeans of other ethnicities exploring their communities' past. "The Yizkor-book pages are linking people in the West, Holocaust survivors and children of survivors to non-Jewish people in those European towns," Field says. Sixty years after the horrors of the Holocaust, the Internet is serving as a tool of reconciliation. "The younger generation is realizing that they are missing a significant part of their history," she adds. "This type of material was suppressed by the communists," who severely restricted access to Jewish archival records.Now word is out. Art teacher Marzena Gruszecka contacted Field from Zgierz, Poland, a predominantly Catholic city where no Jews remain. She had found a Yizkor-book link online while researching her town's Jewish history. At 51, she and others of her generation are too young to remember when, she says, "most of the shops in the town's main street belonged to Jews." President of the Association of Cultural Preservation of the City of Zgierz, Gruszecka is having the Yizkor book translated into Polish and posted online. After funds are raised, she will publish a hardbound version with historical commentary and photos as the centerpiece of "a year of remembrance of the Jewish community," which will include concerts, exhibits, symposiums and landmark identification. "We hope the publication of this moving story about a world that doesn't exist anymore will be a very special event," she says. In the communist era, the ideology was that "Poland is a country of one nation and one culture." As a result, she adds, "people have been deprived of their roots. [Now] there is a chance for renewal of Zgierz, in architecture and the re-creation of its identity."No one could be more delighted than Jerrold Jacobs of Egg Harbor Township, N.J. In 1998, the retired CEO of Atlantic Energy hunted for documents shedding light on his family history, even traveling to his father's birthplace in Zgierz. Online, he found a comprehensive Zgierz Yizkor book for sale by a Tel Aviv bookstore. In 2000, Jacobs, then 62, became one of Field's volunteers, coordinating the book's translation into English and its publishing on the Internet (where Gruszecka discovered it).That the Zgierz account not only described Nazi deportations but also detailed 19th century Jewish life was a bonus. Jacobs learned of ancestors who were feldschers (barber-surgeons), starting with his great-great-grandfather Meir Jakubowicz, who applied in 1843 to live outside the Jewish ghetto a few overcrowded streets, whose confines Zgierz Jews battled for a half-century. Jakubowicz, who did not dress in traditional Jewish attire, was among the few granted permission. "When the cholera epidemic and other illnesses spread in the city, Jakubowicz always was available to serve the sick from various walks of life ... without reward," the account testified. Says Jacobs: "The book gives you a sense of being part of a continuum......for the rest go to; http://www.time.com/time/generations/article/0,9171,1101040531-641131-2,00.html or click
http://www.time.com/time/generations/article/0,9171,1101040531-641131-2,00.html
- Friday, May 28, 2004 at 12:15:18 (EDT)
Illustration---http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurenets/kur118.html---- by Avraham Dimmenstein----- Itzhi Chatzi's (Itzhak son of Yehezkel Zimmerman)--- Each epitaph or maxim must sprout from certain life experience, yet after it germinates it becomes like a lamp that lights the experience from which the epitaph came out of. It brings out the memory or character of an encountering. There is an epitaph that says The phrases of the acumen are expressed in a peaceful, pleasant manner, every time I hear this proverb, immediately the image of Itzhi Chatzi's arises in front of my eyes. He will come to me, walking toward me very erect. He walked in a regularly paced, calm manner, dressed in very refined, impeccable clothes, all of his appearance is filled with serenity and self-assurance. I tried to remember if I ever saw him hurrying somewhere, and I could never remember a single occasion. He was very even-tempered in the way he interacted with people around him, but this was not limited to only the people around him, but in all of his dealings with the creator. This is the way he approached the ark, during the High Holy Day. It was this manner that he used when he read the Torah with his powerful and crystal-clear voice. Many times when he led the prayers for the synagogue, he appeared as if he was spilling his soul to God. He humbled himself before God, but when these passages would come from his mouth, there was a certain strength that would not ever be heard with any other clergyman. When you heard his prayer you visualized even the most difficult words and they became apparent. His style of explanation was almost pedagogical, as if he was demonstrating to our Father in Heaven in a brilliant voice that he must rescue his nation. From all that I know, Reb Itzhi never left the town. With great astonishment I would ask myself, Where did he study and how did he study? Since his knowledge was so vast and covered so many fields, it was such an inexplicable thing. He was like a sponge that never lost one drop. Not only did he have an excellent memory, but he also possessed analytical sharpness and he would have great insight and ability to clarify difficult topics. I loved Reb Itzhi very much. There was a time when he was my teacher. I loved listening to him during debates. He would speak quietly and peacefully, and slowly his argument would pierce his opponent. It would cut through the weak spot of his opponent's argument and then take apart the core of his reasoning. Sometimes he would just hint, sometimes he would use analogies, but he would always be concise, pinpointing his arguments. After he had concluded the debate, there would be no questions left to ask. I remember that on one of these occasions, the rabbi from Lublin came to visit. His aim was to collect donations for the foundation of a Yeshivah. He delivered a sermon in front of a large crowd in the synagogue. If I am not mistaken, the subject was the basic rules of the Torah in the Rambam. All of a sudden, Reb Itzhi stood up and made a comment. I don't remember the comment or the details of the debate that ensued, but I remember how surprised the rabbi from Lublin was by the cleverness and the revealing, insightful statements of Reb Itzhi. I remember him saying to the most respected Jews in the town, You have a most precious pearl in Kurenets, and you are blessed. On one occasion, Reb Itzhi saw a man from town, one who liked to pretend he was very scholarly. The young man was reading nothing less than the book Yeshu hanotzri (Jesus the Christian) by Kloyzner. Reb Itzhi came to him and looked at the book and simply asked, Tell me, my dear, is everything from Genesis until Jesus Christ is clear and known to you? I remember the days when Germany started the war with Poland in September of 1939. People would stand around in small groups, busying themselves with politics and strategies. Someone stood and proved with all sorts of evidence that in just a few weeks, Hitler would arrive. Itzhi came to him and said, Why are you scaring the crowd? Hitler will not arrive here; he is afraid of the white bears. Everyone started talking and found some comfort in the statement since it wasn't anybody who said it, but it was the respected Reb Itzhi. And here Judkah, the son of Hasia Riva, who was a great admirer of the Soviets said, And maybe he's really afraid of the Red Bears? Reb Itzhi knew to win debates without answering. His face had the expression that showed how silly he thought the point was, and though he was left without an answer, Judkah still felt he lost the argument. Not many days passed and then the Russians arrived in town. They wore white uniforms for camouflage. Now Reb Itzhi found this occasion as a good time to answer Judkah. He met him in the street and said, So Judkah, red or white? I remember that the goy Mishka Takotznik was drunk and he started a brawl, and Reb Itzhi came to him and said a few words. Mishka immediately seemed to sober up and said, You are right, Mr. Itzhi, you are very right. In God's name, justice is with you. He immediately stopped fighting. But this event accord in a time when knowledge and light still reigned. With the 32 martyrs the blood of Reb Itzhi was spilled. [1]--------- The light darkened in the world. The darkest of desires jumped out, and darkened his life as well as the lives of his family members ---------  [1]-Three daughters of Ytzi Zimerman perished in the holocaust. (Ethel and Minya Spektor perished in Kurenitz on the same day that their father perished and Sarah with her family, in Volozhin) Ytzis' wife Feyge, perished with her grandchild, the baby of Mina and Sam Spektor on 9-9-1942. A son and a daughter; Dina survive and they now live in the U.S. The son who changed his name to Charles (nee Yechezkel) Gelman wrote a book Don't Go Gentle about his life during the war. You could find excerpts of his book at http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/stories_gentle.html.
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurenets/kur118.html----
- Thursday, May 27, 2004 at 23:09:45 (EDT)
To all readers, please know that earlier this week Charles Gelman of New Haven, a partisan fighter in the woods from Kurenets, died. My father Stanley, also a survivor who knew Charlie from Kurenets, and I will be making a shiva visit tonight. Charlie was a member of my synagogue, Temple Beth Sholom, where he was a cantor in the early years, and he is survived by his wife, Shoshonie, and a son and daughter. Charlie wrote a book, "Do not go Gentle", published by Argyle Press, Hamden, about life and the war in Kurenets, in which my family is mentioned. Regards, Steven C. Sosensky, sosensky@aol.com. --------------- Chapters from "Do Not Go Gentle" by Charles Yechezkel Gelman (nee Zimerman)--------------------------------- July 1941. We were huddling in the backyard of our neighbor, Mote-Leyb Kopershtooch, sitting on the ground, our backs against the wall, and talking in whispers. The German army had arrived in town barely one week earlier. No specific orders or edicts against Jews had been proclaimed at this point. Yet the air was more and more permeated with fear each passing day. Even on bright days it felt as if a heavy cloud had descended on us. Mote-Leyb's house stood next to my father's. I reached his yard by going through a hole in the back fence, as did a couple of neighbors from the other side of Mote-Leyb's house. We met there daily just to stay out of the way of the police and the Germans, to exchange the latest rumors, and to kill time. Our former routine of living had been broken, most likely forever. That day, Leybke the barber was there and so was my friend, Nyomke Shulman. Leybke regretted not having escaped with the retreating Russians while there was still time. Not that he hadn't tried. In fact, he told us, he had made a half-hearted effort to go east. He acquired a horse and buggy, a real fancy one, a brichke they used to call it, and he put his wife and two children in it and drove off. They got as far as Kostenevich, a small town about seventeen kilometers from our town of Kurenits (sometimes pronounced, but never written, Krnits; in Polish Kurzniec, in Russian Kurents). Leybke's wife kept begging him to return home, where things were familiar and safe. She couldn't take the hardship and uncertainty of what lay ahead along the way--air raids, hunger, trouble with bandits, just to mention a few. So they turned back. Leybke concluded his story by saying he could see he'd made a mistake in giving up so easily; he should have pressed on. I couldn't help but agree with him--in though only, of course. Leybke was more vulnerable than most of us because of the high standing he had had with the Soviet authorities. Being a barber and a real proletarian, his background was, from the Soviet political view, impeccable. We lived in the eastern part of Poland. When the Soviets occupied it on September 17, 1939, they promptly divided the population into politically "acceptable" and "unacceptable" segments. Anyone who didn't have his passport stamped with the designation "worker" or "peasant" could eventually expect trouble from the authorities. Because a large segment of the shtetl (small town) Jews made their living before 1939 buying and selling, they had been designated "businessmen." Many were just peddlers and small merchants; they earned barely enough to keep body and soul together. Nevertheless, they received the negative designation. It didn't bode well for the future. The Soviet authorities were helped along in these and other matters by local activists who cooperated with them, often to the detriment of others--Jews as well as non-Jews--and informed on them as to their wealth, political reliability, and so forth. Some people were taxed into poverty, deprived of their houses, furniture, and all material goods. Some were even sent to Siberia as a result of the activities of these informers. Leybke was considered an activist, although of a different kind. So far as I know, he was not an informer, but he had high-placed friends in the local hierarchy. I know for a fact that he had saved the life of my brother-in-law, Sam Spektor. Sam had been inducted into a work brigade about three months before the Germans invaded Russia on June 22, 1941. Leybke convinced the authorities that Sam was the only person capable of organizing and training a city orchestra, which the Soviets very much desired. So Sam was left behind. The Soviets mobilized quite a few men from our town of Kurenits and sent them to the German border to build fortifications. None of them ever returned and they were never heard form again. Most of these activists had retreated along with the Soviets, well ahead of the approaching Germans, because they feared retribution from the non-Jewish population who were anti-Soviet. Some fled with their families. Others left wives and children behind, mistakenly believing that only they themselves were in danger. Many of those who fled survived the war. Of the families that activists left behind, none survived. During the first few weeks of the German occupation, such an outcome could not be foreseen. Had anybody described such a scenario as eventually coming to pass, we would have considered them deranged. Rumors abounded: "The Russians are counterattacking." "They've taken back this or that city." "The Germans have taken Smolensk (a Russian city on the way to Moscow)." "The war can't last more than a month longer." Few of them were true. Confusion was the order of the day; for real news we were utterly in the dark. Listening to radio broadcasts was forbidden under penalty of death. News from the front was unavailable. What we did hear was mostly sketchy and unreliable. The, only a few days later, Leybke told us he had been summoned to the police station; he had been informed he must appear there the following day, ready to be shipped out to an unknown destination. He would be allowed to take with him only five pounds of food and clothing. We were sitting in our usual place and discussing this latest development. Leybke said he though the Germans would send him to a labor camp. He wasn't worried about himself, because he thought he could always survive if they allowed him to take his barbering tools with him. "Even in a labor camp, hair must be cut," he said. He was confident that he would make out all right. Thoughts like that seemed quite plausible at that time. We had not heard of any German atrocities yet, except for two instances, which the Jewish population interpreted as unfortunate accidents. Between the time the Russians fled Kurenits and the time the German army arrived, the town was without any real authority. It was decided to organize a sort of civil guard; gentiles and a few young Jewish men participated in order to guard against looting. The men were armed with rifles left by the Russian police and even used the local police station. Unwisely, this action continued several days after the Germans entered. Early one morning two young Jewish men, coming off duty and walking back to the police station, were confronted by German soldiers, who discovered they were Jews and arrested them. No explanation was acceptable and the young men were promptly shot. They were cousins and both had the same name--Shimon Zimmerman. One was also known as Shimon dem fishers. The other incident involved two prominent men from Kurenits, both of them merchants and quite rich by our standards. They suffered greatly under the Soviets, who confiscated their businesses and all their merchandise and taxed them so severely--hundred of thousands of rubles--that they lost their houses and savings and fled to another town about thirty-five kilometers away. A good thing they did, too. If they hadn't, they might well have been sent to Siberia. A couple of weeks into the German occupation these merchants started to walk back to Kurenits to try to reclaim the houses that had been theirs. They were intercepted on the road by Germans, recognized as Jews, and promptly shot. These incidents, unfortunate as they were, were in no way recognized as a harbinger of things to come. Leybke reported to the police station as directed and was never seen or heard from again. He was probably shot somewhere out of town. Yet such a fate, at that time, was incomprehensible because it was unbelievable. After all, the Germans are civilized people, we though. They might weed out the communists, but surely they would investigate with at least some semblance of orderly procedure. Were we all nave? With the benefit of hindsight, I can say we certainly were. The truth is that up to that time we had not yet heard of any real atrocities. Throughout the period of Russian administration there were Jews living in our town, as well as in surrounding towns, who had come from the western part of Poland, occupied by the Germans in September 1939. These Jews had managed to come to eastern Poland, even after living several months under the Germans. The stories they told were not pleasant. Jews in German-occupied territory had to wear a yellow star of David on their clothes. At times they were mistreated and demeaned, for example, by being made to wash public latrines and streets. Jews had no right to use the sidewalks; they had to walk in the middle of the street. Religious Jews in the street often had their beards cut by force, or grabbed and a handful of hair pulled out. Sometimes a German officer would order an individual Jew, or a group, to dance for him and then proceed to mercilessly beat up those who hadn't jumped high enough or who had otherwise failed to perform to his liking. There were other stories like these of Jews being humiliated and brutalized. Nonetheless, we heard nothing, not even rumors, of outright shootings. When the Russians offered these displaced persons a chance to return to their former homes in western Poland, a large number of them said yes and signed up to be transported back to the German part of Poland, something they would not have done, we believed, had they thought conditions there to be unacceptable. Of course the Russians never intended to keep their offer; instead, they shipped these transportees east to Siberia. In so doing the Russians unintentionally saved the lives of thousands of Jews. Some died on the way from the primitive conditions of transport, which could last for several months on each leg of the journey. Others perished from the harsh conditions in remote parts of Russia. A majority, though, survived and surfaced in the West after the war. Even much later--after fifty-four of our Kurenits Jews had been shot outside of town on the Simchas Torah holiday of 1941, after thirty-two more had been shot by two policemen in March of 1942, after news reached us of Jews being massacred in surrounding towns--people would still come up with explanations, no matter how feeble, to give the events some justification. For instance, in one town they said the Germans supposedly found a gun. In another they said the Jews hadn't filled their assigned quotas of money, furs, or other goods. In the case of fifty-four, as these martyrs became known, the excuse was that they had been Russian activists, or families of activists, left behind. People excused the massacre of thirty-two by saying the Germans had no direct role in it: the hapless Jews were shot by two drunken Polish policemen. People desperately looked for excuses in order to continue believing that somehow they would survive. Married people with young children were especially prone to this syndrome, as were older people. A case of drowning men grasping for straws. The real truth of things did not crystallize and hit home for some time. In 1941, especially during the summer, we were still innocents. After Leybke disappeared, I continued to get together with a few friends in Mote-Leyb's backyard. The news and rumors that filtered through to us were getting more and more grim every day. It was becoming clearer that the Russians were being defeated on every front and that the Germans were capturing major cities deep inside Russia--all in a matter of only a few weeks. It was discouraging. In this connection, I especially remember the feldsher of our town, a man by the name of Szostakowicz. (Feldsher is a Russian medical title, roughly equivalent to "physician's assistant", given to a person with medical experience and the authority to treat patients, but without a regular medical degree.) One morning I met him as he was walking in the town square, holding in his hand a German grenade, the type with a long wooden handle. It had obviously been given to him by one of his high-ranking German officer friends. He was just toying with it and intended no harm. (Later on, when I was a member of the partisan underground, I had occasion to use grenades like these on the Germans, with their intended purpose.) As we met, he stopped and talked to me for a moment or two before continuing on his way. What I remember most is what he said just before he went on. "You mark my words. This German Reich will last for a thousand years." He was, of course, parroting words from a recent speech of Hitler's, but to me he conveyed the message that he completely believed what he was repeating. The, having said his piece, he strutted away like a peacock, proud of the achievements of his newfound German friends. You can imagine what this chance meeting did to my already sagging spirits. The future looked bright to him, but to usÉWe were on the opposite ends of a seesaw; the higher he rose, the lower we sank. How different things had been only a month earlier. There was no war here then and, with the tight control which the Soviets exercised over news sources, we had absolutely no inkling that war between the Russians and the Germans was in the offing. (The outbreak of war came as a surprise to the Soviets, too.) Under the Russians, we Jews felt for the first time--aside form the lack of freedom and the shortages of food and material things that affected everybody--that we were full-fledged citizens, with anti-Semitism prohibited under severe penalty of the law. I was not quite eighteen then and lived at home with my parents, Yitskhok Zimerman (Iche Khatsyes), my father, and Feyge, my mother. I was the youngest of the five children. My oldest sister, Sarah, was married and lived in the town of Volozin. My youngest sister, Dina, about four years older than I, was also married and lived deep inside Russia, out of reach of the Germans. Also living at home were my two middle sisters, Ethel and Minya. Minya was in the last stages of pregnancy. Her husband, Sam Spektor, had received permission to visit his brother in the city of Kharkov in Russia two weeks before the war started. When war broke out, he couldn't get back. He remained deep inside Russia throughout the war and survived. Our future looked bleak now. What would become of us? Minya was ready to give birth almost any day. How would she cope with a baby in times like these, and without a husband? There were many questions and no good answers. 2 One day an official order of the German commandant was posted in the public square. In both German and Polish it ordered all Jewish males between the ages of fourteen and sixty-five to assemble in the public square at two in the afternoon the next day. Failure to comply, it stated, was punishable by death. No one knew the reason for this order, though many tried to guess. "Maybe they'll make us wash the cobble-stones in the marketplace," some said. "Maybe they'll amuse themselves by making us dance for them," others suggested. Many other explanations like these were offered, which is to say, no one expected the worst. Yet failure to appear at the ordered time and place would probably be unwise because the Germans might check the people present against a list of town residents. As it happened nothing much really did occur. About eight hundred men showed up at the appointed hour and were made to stand in the hot summer sun, facing the German Kommandantur (commandant's office and garrison headquarters). After about an hour had passed, German soldiers with machine guns came out of the building and took up positions facing us. They remained in that attitude for about another hour. This was the low point of the day. The Germans, with their machine guns, certainly looked menacing enough and I had second thoughts about the wisdom of having showed up. Then, after we had been standing there for more than two hours, the German commandant finally came out. He was a man about fifty years old and held the rank of major. He told us not to worry. He wished to have a Judenrat (council of Jews) appointed. Then and there he selected an Austria Jew, a man by the name of Schatz, to be the Judenrat leader. And then he dismissed the entire group and told us to return to our homes. Except for a few cases of sunburn and of one person fainting from the heat, nothing bad had happened to anyone. We didn't appreciate how lucky we were until a month or so later when we found out that in the town of Vileyka, only seven kilometers away, all the Jewish male population from fourteen to sixty-five years of age had also been ordered to assemble before their local commandant, at approximately the same time we were before ours. But all of them--about two thousand men--were taken away and vanished without a trace. This was followed by all kinds of rumors as to their whereabouts. Some peasant had seen them in a labor camp thirty kilometers away. Or they might be in another labor camp eighty kilometers away. Needless to say, all these reports were false. The men had in fact been shot the same day they were taken away. Their place of execution was not discovered until after the war. Obviously, then, local commandants had discretionary power to determine the fate of the Jews within their jurisdiction. We were lucky to have gotten a commandant with a human heart. He would prove this again a little later in an incident involving my family. The Judenrat was organized the day after the assembly in the Kurenits public square and consisted of eight to ten Jews, with Schatz as leader. It served as the instrument through which the Germans conveyed all their orders and wishes to the Jewish population. For example, a certain number of Jews were required to go and work at Lubanye, a state-run farm not far away. Other Jews were detailed to clean the offices of the German administration, the police, the civil administration, and so on. Money, furs, jewels, Persian rugs, and paintings were to expropriated from the Jewish population. All these orders were given to the Judenrat, which then apportioned them among the Jewish population. This was not always done fairly. Towards the end of July, I was among the 150 Jewish young people between the ages of seventeen and thirty sent up to the state farm of Lubanye for three days of work in the fields. After the three days were up, we were relieved by another group of the same size. Each of us had to go work there about once every two weeks. The rest of the time we worked in or around town. Lubanye was about six kilometers away, but no transportation was provided; we had to walk there and back. Each of us brought our own food for three days with us. I remember bringing along only a loaf of bread and a bottle of milk. Food was getting scarce and little could be spared. So we supplemented the food we brought from home with cabbage and carrots from the gardens we tended. Of course we weren't entitled to do this, so we took the vegetables on the sly. Carrots posed no problem; nothing obvious was left after you pulled one or two out of the ground. All you had to do was dispose of the inedible green leafy part. Cabbages were a problem, though, because if you removed the whole head, it left an empty space that could easily be spotted. Getting caught could conceivably mean punishment by beatings or maybe worse, so I used to eat only the inside of a cabbage head, carefully leaving the outside leaves in place. Unless the plant was scrupulously examined, no one could tell that it had been tampered with. At any rate, I was never caught, and I don't recall anyone else was either. I particularly remember one out of many jobs I had to perform in or around our town of Kurenits. During the months of August, September, and part of October 1941, the Germans operated a Durchgangslager (transit camp) in Kurenits--a temporary way station for Russian prisoners of war. Thousands of them were marched in on foot from the eastern front and kept in Kurenits for two or three days of rest before being driven further west. They were kept out in the open at the horse market, where, prior to the war, horse trading had taken place. Day and night, fair weather and foul, the prisoners remained exposed to the elements. When it rained, they got soaked. As time passed and it started getting chillier, their situation quickly became desperate. Every morning a number of dead bodies had to be disposed of, a task assigned to the Jews. Fortunately, I never had to do this. In the transit camp a few of us were given the job of bringing in water in a huge barrel mounted on wheels, from a water source located outside the camp perimeter. The camp was surrounded by barbed wire and electrified wires, with armed guards in watchtowers. The prisoners were usually in bad shape, suffering from malnutrition, fatigue, and exposure. Once a day they got a water soup and about 250 grams of moldy bread. The soup was cooked from moldy cabbage into which had been dropped a few pieces of rotting fish or meat. The camp operated for about three months. It finally closed down at the end of October or maybe the beginning of November 1941. While it operated, at least 100,000 POWs passed through on their way to more permanent sites. We very much pitied them and, when we could, tried to help with a piece of bread, a drink of water, or a found cigarette butt. But their miser was so great that our best efforts amounted to no more than a drop in the ocean. Of course, at the time neither they nor we had any inkling of the scope of the calamity that awaited us all. Of the estimated six to eight million prisoners the Germans captured in Russia, only twenty-five percent survived. The rest were executed or died from systematic hard labor and starvation. The Jews of Europe fared even worse. They had only about a ten percent rate of survival; most of the other ninety percent died by direct execution. During the last days of July 1941, an order came from the German authorities for all Jews to surrender any and all Persian rugs they might have in their possession. My sister Minya, who was in the last days of her pregnancy, owned one of decent quality and about two by three meters in size. She had me help her drop it off at the Kommandantur. The commandant saw us bring it in and, I am sure, noticed Minn's condition. That afternoon a German soldier drove up to our house with a horse and wagon loaded with several sacks of flour and potatoes and proceeded to unload the wagon. "Courtesy of the commandant," he said. Needless to say, these food supplies were a godsend and we made them last quite a while. That major was obviously a decent man and, in the limited framework of his position, apparently tried to do as little harm as he could get away with and even to help when possible. It was always my sincerest hope that he would survive the war in good shape. ..... to read more go to; http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/stories_gentle.html or click;
http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/stories_gentle.html
- Thursday, May 27, 2004 at 19:53:55 (EDT)
I want to thank you so much for the work you have done on this site.  My father's family came from Krivichi, and until we found your website, we have been unable to find any information other than what we know as a family.  We are listed as Kopelovich in the list of martyrs, but here, in Canada and the U.S.A., we have always been Kaplow.   Imagine my delight when we saw two pictures of my family on your site.  Kre - 1, which is a photo of young girls, includes my first cousin, Rashka Kaplow, on the top right.  ( http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/krivichi/kriv_pix/kre1_b.gif a group of girl friends; Rashka, Sonia, Rachel, Rivka, Mara, Ester, Malka, Beylka, Sima and Henia)   Kre - 8, includes my father, mother and infant older sister, standing next to my father's parents.  The photo was taken during a visit to his parents as they were traveling from Rishon LeZion, then in Palestine, to Newfoundland, Canada, where many Kaplows settled at that time.  It was taken in early 1939. (title; The families of Eli Kopelovich with Zilberglait- Shtiengold during a visit of family members who came from abroad)  http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/krivichi/kriv_pix/kre8_b.gif) My questions are:  1.    Can you (or someone) translate the descriptions under those photos?   2.    Where does the list of Martyrs come from.  There are other Kopelovich's on the list and I would love to know if they were related, and if so, how.  Do you know how I might find out?   3.    How did these martyrs die?  Were they driven into a burning synagogue, as I believe I read somewhere on your website?  I have also heard that they were all shot.   3.    Are there records available anywhere that I could use to search further back in time? I can see from the list of martyrs what the first names of my grandparents parent's were... but I don't know things like my grandmother's maiden name.    Thank you again for all your good work. _________________________________________________ Celia Kaplow Montreal QC  http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/krivichi/krivichi.html click for the site
http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/krivichi/krivichi.html
- Tuesday, May 25, 2004 at 11:12:12 (EDT)
Re: Sklut on the Ellis Island site and a page for Volozhin---------------- I came from the Ukraine to USA about 12 years ago, and the way my last name was spelled in English by Ukrainian authorities was SKLYUT. may be it will help you in your search, because I am sure many people must have been spelled this way.------------ Olga Sklyut--- Alyoaka73@aol
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- Monday, May 24, 2004 at 22:50:31 (EDT)
Liovke Reznitzki family of Lebedevo My first encounter with the shtetl Lebedevo was when I turned fourteen. My mother ZL became ill and was taken to the hospital in Lebedevo. Since Lebedevo was only 28 Kilometers away from my home in Krasne My cousin, Asher skloot, and I, would ride our bicycle and visit her often. I still remember the name of the doctor who did the surgery; Dr. Shuster. My mother recovered and returned home. Some times later our next door neighbor, the very well to do and one of the most respectful persons in our town; Eliyahu Kaplan, married his youngest daughter; Dvushka to the oldest son of Mr. Ytzhak Reznitzki the pharmacist and the only owner of a drug store in Lebedevo. The young groom came to live in our town. He was already a well-educated man at that point, despite of his young age. I needed some tutoring in math (Strange considering the fact that my life occupation had to do with numbers.) Since we were neighbors Dvoshkas sister Matla became my tutor and I would come to their house regularly and became like one of their extended family. Elyiahu Kaplan was the owned of two electric saw mills as well as flour mills- he even had a mill on the river Usha. When the Soviets arrived the mills were all confiscated, still the mill on the river Usha saved the life of the young couple. During the massacre in Krasne they found shelter in that mill that was on the road to Horodok. From there they escaped and after many days of tribulation arrived to the partisan unit that I joined. Lyuba who was well educated and very articulate especially in the Russian language was immediately appointed to an office job in the main headquarters of the brigade. As refugees we could not even dream of such a job particularly being Jewish arriving with a young beautiful wife and no weapons or military training. When the war ended the father of Liovke Reznitzki; Ytzhak and his youngest son; Moshe returned to the area from deep in the eastern part of the Soviet Union were they spent the war years far from the Nazis. In Lebedevo the father was privileged to be hired as a worker at the pharmacy he once owned. Like any good Jewish father, the priority was education and the young son was sent to school and when the repartation movement started, which meant that the people who were once citizens of Poland were able to leave the Soviet Union to Poland. I had no idea what I should do and so on a wintery day, with Lyovka, we harnessed a sleigh to the strong horse and traveled to his father, Reznitzsky, for advice. The advice he gave me was to immediately leave. I am not able to take advantage of this because I want my young son to finish his studies here. My son, Liovke, advised, and I keep repeating myself, saying, Go very quickly out of here. Reznitzki and his wife traveled to Poland and from there they immigrated to Canada and I went to Israel. Since the war progressed and relationship could be continued from afar, we continued seeing each other and keeping in touch every time they visited Israel. They visited fairly frequently since his wife had two sisters here. Since his good friend from Lebedevo was Yshayau was my neighbor during every visit to Israel, he visited my family and the Yshayau family. During each visit, we would reminisce about the shtetl and life in the ghetto and in the forest and about the childhood and teenaged and the shtetl that is no more.
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- Wednesday, May 19, 2004 at 21:11:07 (EDT)
I have fortunately made contact with a cousin who has great info on my mothers background. First she is from a town in Vilna Gubernia called Plissa. Plissa is supposed to be slightly south of my fathers hometown of Gluboyke, but I can't find Plissa on the map. If anyone can help locate it I would apreciate it. If someone with Beiders dictionary of Surnames can check my gf's name BROJIDE( pronounced Brody I think) my gm's maiden name of BALENSON, and my ggm's maiden name PLISKIN. All from Plissa. Thanks in advance Larry Kotz I would like to know if anyone knows of anyone named KOTZ, outside of Washington DC or Tucson, Az. I caveat this request by mentioning that I am not interested in non-jewish poeple by this surname. The Kotz's come from Gleboyke in present day Belloruss. I would also like any imput anyone may have on the origine of the name. The Kotz's are not related to Katz's, as the Kotz family are not Cohanim as are the Katz's.Thanks Larry Kotz, Tucson,Az.
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USA - Wednesday, May 19, 2004 at 12:08:19 (EDT)
I thought I'd share this story with all of you:I used one of those gedcom to html conversion programs and put a portion of my research on the web about two years ago. Now, it keeps expanding, so I keep the web part to the direct family lines, which is about 1000 people. If I put the whole thing up, I'd be out of web space quickly.About a year ago, I got an email: Would I be interested in information about an illigitimate son of my father's first cousin? I of course answered yes, and got a story that no one in the family either knew or talked about: Evidently, my father's cousin had an affair with a non jewish woman, and she became pregnant. This was in 1938. Due to family pressure of the religious issue, they did not marry. The child was raised by his mother, who subsequently married, and the baby adopted by her husband. My family lost touch completely at some point with them.This baby grew up to have four children - one of his children was the person who contacted me. We have since become fairly close, and correspond via email almost daily (She lives in france, with her husband and baby). My father's cousin married a few years later, and they had two children. Those children, both daughters, were lost track of, and the cousin and his wife have subsequently died. Well, I got an email from one of the daughters today - thanking me profusely for all my research. She had just gotten off the phone with a half-brother she never knew existed. Not only that, she thought that all the family on her father's side was dead (that's my side of the family, if you are not keeping track of this. Another thing that blew her mind was when she found my web site, there was an old picture of her father as a young man that she had never seen before.Another good reason for putting your research on the web.If you are interested, my site is at :http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Pointe/1758/There are three links there - one, call four generation charts, will take you to the gedcom to html pages, including family pictures. Another will take you to my stuff at family tree maker. And a third will link to an article written by my great-uncle of his memories of life in europe (he left at age five) as well as early 20th century cleveland.Main familly names: LEVINSON, APPELBAUM, ARIAN, HURWITZ, KOTTLER, KISBER, BASKINDMain towns: Ilya, Kalverija, Dunilovichi, Postavy, Usla (Sp? - haven't located that town yet) and Possbily Kolno. Morris Wirth Researching: MOGILNIK/DLOT/ Vilnius, Panevezys, Vidzy, Salakas, Riga, Postavy, Smargon, New York, Israel; JAKUBOWICZ/FRYDMAN/SILVERSTEIN/LESSOR/ Colon, Israel, Toronto, Bledow; SZTULMAN/ Babiak, Sompolno, Lodz, Sieradz, Frankfurt, Israel, New York; WROCLAWSKI/ Lututow, Sieradz, Opatow, Lodz, Zgierz, Belgium, Israel, New York, New Jersey, California; GLIKSMAN/ Sieradz, Belgium, Montreal, Toronto From: Dezrtdwler@aol.com To: jewishgen@nysernet.ORG Subject: Yiscor Book Gleboyke Belorus Message-ID: I would like to inform the list of an amazing Yiscor book that details Holocaust Info on the towns of Gleboyke,Sharkoystzene,Dunilovitch,Postav,Droiye and Kazan in what is now Beloruss. Most of the detail references Gleboyke. The detail is really amazing. Families are listed by street and name, referencing who survived and how many familiy members perished. I found my grandfathers house mentioned, although they mispelled our last name(Katz instead of Kotz). Hundreds of families are listed, although there are some inacuracies pointed out by my father who survived. Please E-mail me if you are interested in a copy, I have gotten the charges from a local copy service.Larry Kotz E-Mail Dezrtdwler@aol.com
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- Wednesday, May 19, 2004 at 11:45:50 (EDT)
In a message dated 5/17/04 8:42:05 PM Pacific Daylight Time, Jerrykapel writes: I was born in England, in Manchester father was Aaron, grandfather Joseph, great grandfather Yitzak. was always told they originated near vilna. thought the name was changed to davidson have found many davidsons in your pages especialy from Vishnevo. the photos  bear striking family likeness especially Yitzak and Leib. can this be traced, only have an aunt Rose and an uncle Ernie left from my fathers brothers and sisters Dear Merna, in The All Lithuania Revision List Database there are 117 "Davidson" The town were most of the Davidsons came from was Vishnevo http://eilatgordinlevitan.com/vishnevo/vishnevo.html- (Shimon Peres - once Israel prime Minster- was born there) Vishnevo is very near Vilna (the pictures on my site#1 and #2 are from Vishnevo... In  Vishnevo Revision List for the Year 1858 Vishnevo Family Davidson Revision List Database for the year 1858 Surname Given Name Father Relationship Age in 1858 DAVIDSON Itsko Elia Head of Household 45 DAVIDSON Elia Itsko Son 18 DAVIDSON Movsha Itsko Son 15 the family left in 1953 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DOVIDSON Dovid Leyzer Head of Household 35 DOVIDSON Gita Wife 30 DOVIDSON Chaya Dovid Daughter 1 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DOVIDSON Leyb Itsko Head of Household Died in 1858 at age 64 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DOVIDSON Markel Izrael Head of Household 42 DOVIDSON Sora Dvora Zysko Wife 44 DOVIDSON Zelda Markel Daughter 2 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DAVIDSON Girsh Leyba Head of Household 58 DAVIDSON Gita Wife 46 DAVIDSON Dovid Girsh Son 32 moved in 1883 DAVIDSON Tsivia Daughter-in-law 27 moved in 1883 DAVIDSON Chaya Dovid Grandchild 9 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DOVIDSON Yankel Leyba Head of Household 58 DOVIDSON Abram Yankel Son Conscripted in 1852 DOVIDSON Rubin Leyba Head of Household 38 moved in 1880 DOVIDSON Freyda Abram Wife 32 moved in 1880 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DOVIDSON Gershon Lipka Head of Household 23 left in 1858 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ DOVIDSON Ovsey Leyba Head of Household died in 1852 at age 59 DOVIDSON Gershon Ovsey Son 34 left in 1854 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DOVIDSON Ovsey Fayva Head of Household 48 DOVIDSON Beyla Iosel Wife 47 DOVIDSON Leyb Ovsey Son died at age 26 in 1853 DOVIDSON Fayva Ovsey Son 31 DOVIDSON Rocha Dovid Daughter-in-law 27 Fayva's wife DOVIDSON Leah Fayva Grandchild 3 DOVIDSON Leyb Hatskel Nephew Conscripted in 1852 at age 13 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DOVIDSON Elia Abram Head of Household 47 DOVIDSON Etka Girsha Wife 46 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DOVIDSON Abram Fayva Head of Household Died in 1858 at age 67 DOVIDSON Leyzer Abram Son 39 DOVIDSON Fruma Iosel Daughter-in-law 37 DOVIDSON Freyda Leyzer Grandchild 15 DOVIDSON Pesia Leyzer Grandchild 12 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DOVIDSON / RABINOVICH Yankel Kiva Head of Household 41 Surname is Dovidson or Rabinovich DOVIDSON / RABINOVICH Chaya Elia Wife 39 DOVIDSON / RABINOVICH Rikha Yankel Daughter 18 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DOVIDSON Meyer Shimshel Leyzer Head of Household 31 Missing DOVIDSON Sora Tauba Wife 25 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DOVIDSON Leyb Itsko Ovsey Head of Household 30 missing DOVIDSON Basia Head of Household 29 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DOVIDSON Gershon Leyzer Head of Household 28 moved in 1891 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- in 1929 business directory for Vishnevo; comestibles Zardele Wiszniew Wolozyn DAWIDSON, H comestibles Wiszniew Wolozyn DAWIDSON, J fabric in the Ellis Island records people who came from Vishnevo to America; D'awidson,Mordche Wisenewo 1907 22y Davidsoher,Moische Wiszniowo, Russia 1907 21y 5 Davidson,Lehde Wisinowo 1906 19y 6 Dawidsohn,Chaje Wichnewe, Russia 1912 4y 7 Dawidsohn,Jacob Wischnowa, Russia 1907 17y 8 Dawidsohn,Riwe Wichnewe, Russia 1912 7y 9 Dawidsohn,Tenne Lea Wichnewe, Russia 1912 30y 10 Dawidson,Nochem Wisnowe, Russia 1913 22y 11 Dawidson,Sore Wisnowe, Russia 1907 20y 16 Dewidson,Itte Wisniowe, Russia 1912 20y on the list of the perished in Vishnevo in 1942;Davidson or Dovidson:  1. Chaim 2. Dovidson, his wife and the girls 3. Dovid 4. Dovidson, his wife 5. Yosef, their son 6. Avraham Yitzhak 7. Leah and the children 8. Chaya, their daughter 9. Dovidson, his wife Pesia 10. Lipa 11. Leyb 12. Nechama, his wife 13. Dovidson, the children 14. Yosef' 15. Batia, his wife 16. Dovidson, the children 17. Feyga 18. Elke 19. Chaim 20. Herschel 21. Bila Sheynke 22. Leyb, their son 23. Baruch, their son 24. Shabtai, their son 25. Gansa, their daughter 26. Eliahu 27. Tzvia, his wife 28. Herschel, their son 29. Yitzhak 30. Leah, his wife 31. Moshe 32. Pesia 33. Dovidson, the children 34. Gedaliah 35. Ziltke 36. Dovidson, the sons 37. Dovidson, the daughter 38. Avraham 39. Teyvl 40. Yente 41. Yosef Leyb 42. Sore 43. Pinchas 44. Heshke and his entire family 45. Berl, his wife 46. Malka 47. Dubke 48. Zelda 49. Yitzhak 50. Rokhl 51. Berl and his entire family   Dudsivan:  1. Moshe   some of them moved to a near by town, Volozhin; Ellis Island; 23 Davidson,Jankel Wolosin 1905 8m 24 Davidson,Rochel Wolosin 1905 3y 25 Davidson,Zipe Wolosin 1905 28y 26 Dawidsohn,Seigel Wolozyn, Russia 1911 18y 27 Dawidson,Chana Wolozyn, , Poland 1923 62y 28 Dawidson,Rysia Wolozyn, , Poland 1923 21y Other people who reserch the name; Davidsen Any England Rene Loeb (#2070) Switzerland ReneLoeb@compuserve.com Davidson Vilnius Lithuania Barbara S. Parker (#2166) BarbaraParker@aol.com Davidson Vilnius Lithuania 23 Mar 1997 Elyse Eisenberg (#6426) United States eisenberg@earthlink.net Davidson Vishnevo Belarus 23 Sep 2002 Aharon Davidson (#16033) davidson@bgumail.bgu.ac.il Davison Summerscales England contact Researcher #75767 Davidson Leeds England 5 May 2003 Researcher #78823 Davison Kaunas Lithuania 7 May 2003 Philip Gordon (#79091) peegee@matav.net.il Davison Manchester England 7 May 2003 Davidson Vilnius Lithuania 6 Sep 2001 Diane Steskovitz (#63366) 3472 NW 47th Ave Coconut Creek, FL 33063 United States ds345@hotmail.com Davidson Dublin Ireland 15 Aug 1997 Anna Miriam Gatz (#7757) mirisa@iafrica.com Davidson Sheffield England 15 Aug 1997 Davidson Pusalotas Lithuania 22 Apr 2001 Warren Mandelbaum (#7557) Davidson Vishnevo Belarus 21 Sep 1997 contact Researcher #3808
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- Tuesday, May 18, 2004 at 20:53:46 (EDT)
Hi Eilat,---     I have really enjoyed visiting and searching out all aspects of your website about Druya.  It is very well done. Congradulations.     You asked if I would  give you some family information.  Here it is;  My grandfather was born Joseph Widrovitch in 1863 in ??Libovitch.  At some time he changed his name to Jaffe- possibly about 1881 when he was 18 and of draft age in the Russian army. As you may know, if you were the only son, the Russians would not draft you.  He was apparently given to another family named Jaffe and avoided the draft.      Joseph's father was Selig Widrovitch born about 1820 in ?? Libovitch. He was married to Frieda and they probably lived in Polatsk, Belarusia.   Esther Slova Binnovin was the daughter of Kalman Binnovin and Rochel.  They lived in Vilna, owned a dry goods store, and were wealthy.  Esther was  born in 1865, probably in Vilna.      Esther Slova Binnovin married Joseph about 1885. After marriage they lived in Polatsk, and  had their first child Lena in 1887 and second child Jennie in 1890. About 1890 they moved to Druya.  While in Druya they had 5 sons-sol in 1892, Ben in 1896, Dave in 1898, Isadore in 1900, and Barnett in 1903.  In 1905 Joseph and the oldest daughter Lena immigrated to the USA via Ellis Island.  In 1906 Esther and the 6 children arrived at Ellis Island.----- Burton Jaffe, MD
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- Tuesday, May 18, 2004 at 20:21:14 (EDT)
Stories ;Shlomo Eliaskovitch Shlomo Elishkevich was a partisan. He fought in the forests and survived the Holocaust. He arrived in Eretz Israel in 1946. The following is his own story. Shlomo's Capture and Escape http://www.geocities.com/biography1915/e_shlomo.html At dawn on Sunday, June 22nd, 1941 the war broke out between the Germans and the Russians. At 11:00 AM I was already in my Red Army uniform. I was a reservist in the Russian military at that time. In 1940 following the Russian take over of our area, I was drafted for two- month military duty in the Russian army reserves. I served in the communications branch in Gomel near the big city of Minsk. I was scouting the enemy's air force activities. One day German planes bombarded our region. Our regiment withdrew towards Volozhin where we camped for a few hours. When the German army advanced toward us we fled to Rakov. Then we had to flee Rakov. While trying to cross the bridge on the Berezina River under heavy shelling, one half of our unit managed to cross over before the bridge collapsed. The other half of the unit, myself included, was captured by the Germans. Near Minsk, we were chased into a field that was fenced with barbed wire. Thousands of POW's were herded into this field like cattle. While in captivity, I noticed that every now and then another group of POW's was loaded on a truck and driven away. None of them returned. I concluded the conclusions and escaped after three days. The Escape I escaped with two Jewish POW's. We took advantage of a dark, foggy and rainy night. The German guards entered their "Budkes" (guarding booths). We crossed the fences and ran into a field of very tall rye where we could hide. Then we split. I started toward Vishnive. It took me a whole week to walk there. I walked at night and hid in the forest in the daytime. Sometimes I could find food and sometimes I could not. Initially I was dressed in my Russian Army uniform. When I passed near Rakov, I stopped at the home of one of my Gentile acquaintances. I told him, "Save me, give me Alte Zachen (used clothing) and take away my uniform and shoes." He did what I asked. He gave me clothing and a loaf of bread. After a week I arrived in Vishnive. What Happened in Vishnive When I arrived at the shtetl, I hid as I could not afford to be seen. Vishnive was in German hands. Everybody, both Jews and Gentiles, knew that I was a Russian soldier. If I showed up in the market place, the Gentiles would inform the Germans that I was a Communist and I would be executed immediately. On the other hand, the Russian military publicized an order that anybody who served in their army should rejoin it. At this point I was a deserter. It was clear to me that if I rejoined the Russians they would kill me. That is why I hid for a whole month in our home. We had a big house plus cowsheds and barns. I hid in a big pile of hay. During that month the Germans killed people almost every day. One day they gathered thirty-eight Jews and brought them to the Jewish Cemetery. Among them there were Yaacov-Hirsh Elishkevich and his son Avraham Binyamin, Hirshe Rogovin, Ayzik Rogovin and others. The Germans forced them to dig a big trench. When they finished digging, they were shoved into the trench and were gunned down by the Germans with a machine gun. The machine gun stood near the cemetery on a hill which was located on top of a German bunker left over from WWI. Then the victims were covered over with the ground. Gentile witnesses told that for up to three days following the slaughter the ground covering the mass grave moved, as some of the victims were still alive. The night after the murder of the thirty-eight Vishnivean martyrs I hid as usual inside the pile of hay. I could not sleep because of fear. After midnight I ran to Breshkevitch where a good friend of my family lived. In the days following this murder, the Germans confiscated all the Jewish homes and concentrated the Jewish population in a Ghetto. At that point I came out of hiding and joined the Jewish population in the Ghetto. The Ghetto included all of Krave Street and the synagogue court. The Ghetto was surrounded by a fence made of wooden boards attached with barbed wire. We were forced to stay inside the Ghetto. Whoever was caught outside was immediately executed. Only healthy strong males were taken out to work and then returned. My Work in the Ghetto I worked in loading timber on train cars in Boktove. The loading camp was located seven kilometers from the shtetel. We were a group of sixteen men who worked there for a whole week. On Friday evening we would return to the Ghetto and another group from the Ghetto would relieve us. On Saturday evening we would again go back to work. The Germans guarded us. We would begin work in the morning. We used axes, saws and ropes for cutting and loading the timber on the train cars. The Germans who worked in this location were not from the SS and as such our relations with them were more normal. For us, going to work was a relief from the depressing atmosphere in the Ghetto. And for our work we got two-hundred grams of bread per day. When our group returned to the shtetl after a week of work, police frequently approached us with insults and then began beating us and forcing us to stand, jump, lie down, run, etc. Our Gentile neighbors, who had already settled in our confiscated homes, were watching the sadistic spectacle and our misery with tremendous glee. Their children would throw rocks at us. I remember Konski, a Gentile neighbor who settled in the home of Yaacov Rabinovich, shouted, "Sing the Katyusha (a popular Russian song). Hurry, why dont you sing the Katyusha?" The Last Time The last time we returned to the Ghetto on Friday evening, the German police beat us more cruelly than ever before and confiscated whatever we carried. Before reaching the Ghetto gate we concluded that something was very wrong. We decided not to stay at home for the entire Shabbat, but to return to work early on Saturday morning. We gathered at 6:00 AM and walked back to work. The other shift was amazed to see us so early. We told them what happened and begged them not to return to the Ghetto. They decided to go back. They said that they would avoid the beating by passing through Bogdanov and asking a friendly German to accompany them until they entered the Ghetto gate. They returned to the Ghetto on Saturday afternoon. On Sunday all of them were dead. What Happened to Us We did not know anything. On Sunday nobody was working. We were sitting near the Germans on a hill, talking and worrying about the future. Suddenly a Gentile woman from our shtetl was passing by. She told us in Belarus language, "Oy, my dear Jews. Don't you know? Do you know what's happening in the Ghetto? They killed and burned everybody." From the testimony of Gedalia Dudman in the Vishnive Memorial Book - "At dawn Sunday the SS surrounded the Ghetto. The Jews were notified that they would be transported to a labor camp. They were ordered to pack their most important belongings immediately and wait outside their residences. When everybody was standing ready, all the luggage and some of the old and sick people were loaded on trucks. Then SS men began herding all the others with whips, forcing them to follow the trucks towards the synagogue at the end of Krave Street. Batia Podbereski, who was on one of these trucks, suddenly jumped off and shouted, "Jews, save your lives!" She was shot dead on the spot. After her shouting and the shooting, many Jews began to flee into the fields, but most of them were killed by the German bullets. Their bodies were scattered all over the area between the shtetl and the forest." We were stunned. We could not move. It was clear that our turn to die would come soon. It was getting dark. We decided not to escape at night but wait for the morning. The reason was that the partisans were very active at night. Therefore our German guards were very alert at night as they were guarding mainly their own lives. That is also why we were sure that nothing bad would happen to us at the camp that night We went back into the big house where we stayed during the work week. Just to be on the safe side, we stayed in our clothing that night watching through the windows to see if anybody was coming to take us. At 6:00 AM we went to work instead of the usual 7:00 AM. The Germans were in the habit of coming later and giving us work instructions and priorities. Instead we cut the fences and entered the forest. We split up into three groups in order to improve our chances. We were already deep into the forest when the Germans arrived. We heard their shouts, "Jews, don't worry, come back, nothing bad will happen to you, Jews! Jews!" Then they began shooting in the air. We never responded but continued walking. My group leader was Chazkel Glik. He knew the forest very well. He brought us to a hill inside the forest where we hid until the night. The hill was near Vishnive. I knew the local Gentiles very well. That night Chazkel and I went to some Gentile acquaintances of mine to ask what was happening. They told us that everybody was burned. I could not believe it. I wanted to believe that somehow somebody was saved by the Gentiles. My parents knew that the only chance to save their lives was to be among the Gentiles. My Gentile acquaintances gave us bread, milk and cheese which we brought back to our group in the forest. The food was sufficient for several days. We stayed on that hill for two weeks. Then we continued on to Krave Ghetto. My long journey of sufferings for survival had just begun Vishnive After the War My cousin Shlomo Elishkevich was a partisan. He was a fighter who survived the horrible war. The following is a continuation of his story. Vilna is Liberated - the War is Over After the liberation of Vilna we were informed that each of us had three weeks to decide what he wanted to do next. I was given three options - stay in the militia in Vilna, join the NKVD, or be a commander of a POW camp. I told them that I had left my family in Vishnive. Maybe someone survived. I had many Gentile acquaintances who might know something about my family. I asked to go to my shtetl and also asked for an escort. One could not just simply travel, as you could be arrested or drafted. I got official approval to go back to Vishnive, escorted by my old friend Yechezkel (Chazkel) Glik. I Arrived in Vishnive Upon arrival I understood from conversations with the Gentiles that my whole family had perished. We went to the mass grave on Krave Street. We stood there for a long time. There was nothing to be said. The site spoke for itself. The bones of our martyrs who tried to escape were still scattered all over the fields. I wept seemingly without end as I remembered my family - parents, sisters, brother, my wife and my little son. I cried about my own sufferings during the war. Then we went to the mass grave of the first thirty-eight martyrs at the Jewish cemetery. I could not be consoled. Yechezkel Glik became a big "Nachalnik" (manager) of the forests and helped me a lot. Before the war I owned a dairy business. During the war my machines, such as the centrifuge and other equipment, were distributed among my Gentile friends. I gathered back the equipment and rebuilt my dairy operation. I became "Meister Director Masla-Farm" (Dairy Manager). I spent a whole year in Vishnive. There were fifteen Jews in town. Some of them were from the Minsk area. All of us lived in one house. The town was mostly burnt except some houses on the outskirts. The Poles were shooting at us at night from the forest. Every now and then we had to take cover and hide behind a nearby hill. Then we were asked to rejoin the military. There were rumors I was supposed to go to Korea. I had a friend at the Zaget-Pekat in Berlin. He and his manager visited Volozhin. At that time there was nothing to eat in Vishnive and everybody used to come to taste something at my shop. He and his manager came to me and asked to eat something in my place. I had butter, cheese, sour cream and pork. They had a big dairy operation in Berlin which they took from the Germans. I asked if I could work for them since I was a professional in the dairy industry. His manager decided to send me to Berlin. I was on the road again. After paying a bribe, I was able to cross the border from the USSR to Poland. Local Jews convinced me not to work for the Russians anymore and try to go to Eretz Israel. After tortuous wanderings and stops in Romania, Hungary, Czechoslovakia and Austria, I joined a group of 1500 ex-partisans in Italy in an attempt to illegally immigrate to Palestine aboard a converted cattle ship. Our ship was prevented from sailing by the British who told the Italian authorities to stop us. Several attempts were made to remove us from the ship. We told them that this was our last stand. We would not return to any refugee camp. We would sink the ship and die if they touched any of us. We had a hunger strike. Many people became severely sick, fainted and were taken to Italian hospitals. Finally after a standoff of several weeks and the intervention of the British ambassador to Italy, the British issued "Certificates" (immigration visas) for us. We boarded another ship and made "Aliyah" to Eretz Israel at the end of 1946. Click for the original site
http://www.geocities.com/biography1915/e_shlomo.html
- Sunday, May 16, 2004 at 11:37:54 (EDT)
April 22, 2004 My name is Arie Szewach and I am a native of the Shtetl Krasne. Krasne was located 28 kilometers away from the shtetl of Lebedeve. In 1962 my employers transferred me and we moved to an apartment in Natania. The apartment was located just under the apartment that was owned by a Lebedove native; Yeshayahu (Shayke) Golub and his wife; Pnina nee Zamudik with their three children; Chava, Menachem and Avner. As neighbors, not only did we have much in common, we also turned to be best of friends. We grew to greatly respect and care for the Golub family and we soon found out that we even have friends in common!- A good friend of Yeshayahu was non other then Lyuba Raznitzki, a Lebadeve native who was my next door neighbor in Krasne, after his Marriage to a Krasne native girl from the Kaplan family. (see their story in Krasne stories) I feel compelled to record some of my memories of this very special man from Lebadove . He shared with me much of the details of his aliyah to eretz Israel as well as his life in Lebedevo- Lebedevo that is no more despite the fact that about a hundred Jewish families dwelled there for many generation before the holocaust.. Much like the typical Jewish shtetls in the area Lebedove had all the institutions and enterprises that were common at that time of the Polish rule (1921-1939); Beit Sefer (School) 'Tarbut", a private school that was taught in Hebrew. Various Zionist movements flourished in town and readied the youth to immigrate to Eretz Israel. They also had a home for the impoverished, bathhouse and even a hospital! Many of the youth received training in the different professions and spend many months in 'Hachshara' in preparation for agricultural lifestyle in Eretz Israel. At the completion of the Hachshara they young Zionists returned to Lebedeve hoping to receive the hard to obtain immigration papers to make the aliyah. Yeshayahu was a member of various Zionists organization and received the necessary training and after much tribulation was lucky to obtained the necessary certificates for immigration to Eretz Israel. As time passed I got to know many of Yshayahu' friends and I learned from them about his very special character and many good deeds. I had a first hand encounter with his generosity during a sudden (and very uncommon for me) reversal of fortune that lasted for a very short time. Immediately after hearing about it .. Shayke entered my home with his check book in his hand. He handed my wife a signed check, with the amount left blank, and said; " first take the amount you need and later when things get better we will talk about returning the money" This was the kind of man Shayke was! Now that I found the site for Lebedove I checked with his family and scanned some of their pictures and wrote words to commemorate the life of the Jewish town of Lebedeve as a tribute to a good friend who is not with us any more.. Arie Szewach Omer, israel
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- Sunday, May 16, 2004 at 02:48:09 (EDT)
Marka nee Viner Gitlitz---- I talked with Marka nee Viner Gitlitz in New Jersey. Marka was born in Viazyn in the region of Vileyka. There are some pages about Viazyn in the Vileyka yizkor book, marka said that one of the great contributors for the Vileyka book was married to a woman from Viazin. There were about 20 Jewish families in Viazyn, Markas' father; Zvi Hirshl the Backsmith and his parents lived there since they were born. Markas' mother (Etka) came from Vishneva. Her grandfather Natan (Chaiklin?)Lived in Vishneva with his second wife. Also her mothers' sister (mother of Shlomo Alishkevitz) and brother; Yaakov Shimon (with child; Kusiel) lived in Vishneva. Shlomo Alishkevitz survived with the partisans- He wrote his story in the Vishnevo Yizkor book. Marka also remembered visiting Oshmany in 1937- her mother had an aunt who lived there. One of their daughters survived and lived in Israel. There were also some relatives in Vilna that Marka visited. Also an Alperovitz family who was very well to do and moved to Vilna. Marka remmembered staying in the Hotel that belonged to Shlomo Rogovin (originally from Vishnevo) who lived in Vileika. . Her family had a nice house in Viazyn- in 1936 the house burned down and they build a nice new house- they did not make it as large as they first planed since the Soviets came to the area in 1939 and they did not want to be classified as well to do. Marka did not want to talk about the war- she told me that all her family perished and she still has nightmares about it. After the war she returned to Viazyn for a short time. She could not live alone and she moved with Bat Sheva and Yona Riar in Ilya, who also had other single young men living with them (Ytzka Chadash and others). Yona Riars' mother (who also perished) was originally from Vishnevo and a friend of Markas' mother since youth in Vishnevo. (Viazyn was only 7 kilometers from Ilja and 20 kilometers from Vileyka.) Some other people who survived from Viazyn; Chaia Levin, daughter of Chaim Moshe Kaplan ( with two of her children) in Israel. Fruma Kaplan; her daughter, son and his wife, live in Israel. The son and daughter of Rabbi Yosef Klatzkin, who perished in Vileyka, lived in the Soviet Union. Ben Zion Berman lived in Sweden. Elka, daughter of Batia Gotlibovitz lived in the Soviet Union. Dina Alperovitz and her son lived in New Haven? Rabbi Rafael Shtein in the U.S and Rabbi Shmuel Shtein in Canada. About sixty of the Jews of Viazyn were found and killed in June of 1942.others were killed before in Vileika and Ilja. Marka married Zusha (Jack) Gitlitz of ilya who lost his first wife (Dina Leja Nee Gelman) and his three children (Liba Pesha, Sara and Rashka) in the spring of 1942. Jack Gitlitz was originally from krivichi and his brother with his family perished there. They had two boys.
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- Saturday, May 15, 2004 at 23:41:29 (EDT)
From the Ilja yizkor book; During the Slaughter, in the Ghetto and in the Forests-- By Bat Sheva nee Brunstein Riar Pages 339- 373---- In June 22nd, 1941, I was busy preparing for a party of Pidion HaBen (a religious celebration for a son who reaches a month in age) for my first born, Yehudah. All of a sudden, my mother (Yente Brunstin) came running to the house and announced, MY daughter, dont waste time cooking or baking. The Germans declared war on the Soviet Union and they are quickly approaching the town. Only God knows what will now happen to us. As soon as my husband Jonah Riar, who worked in the town Molodetzno at that point, found out about that situation, he left work and walked home and arrived during the night. Instantly, as the invasion started, the Germans swiftly advanced in Blitzkrieg as they named it, the Russian Army was decimated and many of troops lost their units as pandemonium spread The next morning our town was left without rulers. The farmers who lived in town and the environs abused this condition, and they immediately started looting and pillaging the town. Jewish possessions became free for all. This fact seemed to point to the beginning of the end, and ominously it foretold the future of the Jews. Three days passed and during dusk, I stood with my husband Jonah and looked out the window from our apartment. We started shaking from anxiety seeing a German soldier riding on a motorcycle, behind him rode hundreds and thousands of Germans in different vehicles. Some came in cars, others riding motorcycles, others in tanks, trucks, armored cars, and all sorts of transportation. Day and night the German vehicles rolled through town, heading east without any stops. Within a week, the Germans put a police headquarters in town, and their first mission was to arrest all those who were suspected of involvement with the Communist Party. The first among the Jews to be arrested were Zalman, son of David Chaikin (nicknamed Zamka) and Baruch Zisman. Their arrests took place at four in the afternoon, on June 28, 1941. Already the next morning they were taken to the forest near the Haobichik and were ordered to dig a hole. There they were shot and buried. When their wives, Fania Chaikin and Leah Zisman, came to bring them food in the prison in the local Gmina, they were notified by the guards that their husbands had been killed. Clearly the women didnt believe them, and no one in town believed, but it was true. To find out if this information was true, the families paid large amounts of money to villagers who opened the graves during the night, and cut some of the clothing of the murdered men, and brought them as evidence of the tragic occurrence. The families paid large sums of money and were able to bring the bodies of their husbands and sons to a proper burial in the Jewish cemetery. The members of the German police changed many times, but the pattern of desecration seemed to be consistence. After a few days passed, an order came that all Jews of the town must arrive every morning near the headquarters, and from there they would be sent out to different jobs such as cleaning the streets, the toilets, and other work such as this. The German headquarters confiscated a few of the large Jewish homes, and the house of my mother-in-law was amongst those homes. The Germans now lived in the front, and in the back rooms lived the family of my husband. The German residents would enter the home of my -in-laws (Chaia- Pesia and Noach Riar) and have a long conversation with my husbands sisters; Yoheved (Shapira) and Taibe. They introduced themselves as a caring German, and warned them that soon they would be replaced by the SS, who would torture, kill, and burn all the Jews. They emphasized that the bodies of torched Jews warmed them themselves, at certain times. My sisters-in-law would tell me about these awful tales, but we couldnt believe that such tortures were possible in our century. At that point, we discussed it and said that no logical person could consider that such tales could be a daily, systematic occurrence. One time, after a night of drunken revelry at a dance party that lasted until the morning hours, the Germans returned to the house of my in-laws. One of the drunken German men, instead of going to his place, tried to break into the area where my in-laws lived. Of course he found the door locked, so he tried to break it in and the handle broke, hitting him in the face. He became furious and started screaming wildly, saying that he would kill all the males he could find in the apartment, because it must be that they were trying to hurt him. When the males heard this, they jumped out into the yard. When my sister-in-law opened the door, the German jumped in and started looking for the men. Lucky for us they had time to escape. The German could not calm down and he decided to look in the next home, the home of Sheinke, where my husband and I were staying. When we heard the knock, I asked Jonah to open it, but his heart felt something bad and he asked me to open it. When I opened to door, the German soldier came in with his gun drown and screamed, If I find one man in this house, he will immediately be shot. My heart fell, but I tried to control my nerves. I knew that the fate of my husband, who was hiding in the bed, depended upon my calm behavior. I invited the soldier inside and sat on the bed, trying to hide my husband, and quietly taking care of my little baby Yehudah, who was lying near the bed. Since the German didnt seen Yonah, he left to the area where Sheinke lived to look for men. Her sister, Itka Alperovich, who lived on the other side of the wall, heard everything and ran to the headquarters to call a German officer. When the officer came, he told the soldier to get out of the house. So now it was proved to us that the horror stories of the Germans were true. Still, we tried to tell ourselves that it was just one incident, and asked, Why would they kill us for no reason? It couldnt be true. As this unit was replaced, the next unit ordered us to establish the Judenrat. A committee of the Judenrat had to work diligently in a job that was very difficult and unpleasant, but the Jewish community understood the difficulties they encountered. The Germans would order the Judenrat to collect different taxes from the Jewish people and to supply swiftly all the needs of the Germans, which kept increasing. The first order was to confiscate all the cows. They were taken for the German Army and that really hurt the poorest population, since the cows gave them milk for survival. Next they ordered 400 bushels of wheat and 3000 meters of carpeting. Clearly everything that they demanded they received, although it was difficult to find these goods. Together with those demands, the Germans told the Judenrat to bring 10kg of gold. It seemed like there was no end to their demands. Although the members of the Judenrat knew that it was very difficult for the Jewish community to fill the orders, they had no choice but to hurry them along and urge them to do it. They were under the illusion that this would save the lives of the community. As the winter months approached, the Germans ordered the Judenrat to collect all the warm clothes that the Jews had, and to give them to the military. Fur coats, boots, warm blankets, wool socks and gloves. After much tribulation, we were able to reach our quotas, and we tried to believe that this would save us all. I believe that Germans succeeded in making the Jewish population complacent by keeping them under the illusion that they could stay alive as a prize for fulfilling all the demands that were put on them. They were helped by the fact that in the nearby towns, there were many massacres already in Radoshkovich, Molodeczno, Vileyka, Kurenets, and Dolhinov. But here the Germans didnt kill the Jews of Ilja other then the two during the summer. Every Jewish survivor who arrived to town from a massacre in another town was received happily and we shared our homes and our food with them. So despite the fact that they would say we shouldnt have illusions and that our fates had already been decided and it was only a matter of a time, people refused to listen. I remember a young man from nearby Pleshensitz who came to us after the massacre there. He insisted that the Jews should prepare some dry bread and escape to the forests. Only a few listened to him, but most of the community said that he was insane. But then came the bitter day and what we so feared occurred.. On March 17, 1942 as dawn came we realized that the Gestapo had surrounded the town. They started taking Jews out of their homes and herded them into the central Market Square. Not one person left his home willingly. The Germans and their local collaborators took the Jews out of their homes by force. It took only about an hour and all of the Jews of the town, old, women, and babies were in the central market, surrounded by Germans with drawn weapons. I wont give details of that bitter day. Even today I cannot bring myself to discuss that, but I will try to tell about a few special moments that have left an eternal imprint in my heart. While we were standing there, surrounded by the Gestapo, waiting for our deaths, a few of the police from the local population came to us and announced, Jews, these are your last minutes on this earth. Give us the gold and the money that you hid. Anyway, youll never be able to use it. Since the community had already given up, some started telling them where they had left their possessions. Even my husband Jonah wanted to give his knife, but I told him not to, since I thought they would get mad that he was only giving them a knife. I remember that Hillel Kopilovich told one of the Germans that in his house he had gold and silver. The German took him out of the line and brought him to his home to take the treasure, but Hillel really wanted to take his tallit and fillim, and to try to trick the German. As soon as he took his tallit, the German thought there was gold inside the cover of the tallit, and he pulled it out of his hand and realized he had been lied to. He became very cruel and started beating him until blood spilled everywhere. Hillel returned all wounded and covered with blood. The German kept cursing him, Cheating bloody Jew. Even today I dont have the ability to describe that horrible feeling we felt when the Germans started making a selection of who was to live and who was to die. The Germans needed only small portions, about 20 families of skilled workers. Amongst them they chose my husband and I, with our child Yehudah, to live. The sight of torture will never leave my eyes. I saw my handsome, talented, dear brother Yakov, his body was lifeless in the middle of the street. Until today, the ripping calls of my little brother Elimelech ring in my ears. He said to me with a heart-wrenching cry, But I am so young, why do I have to die? Why do I have a death sentence? The torturous image of barbaric sadism that was so thirsty for blood forever stays with me. My husband sister, Yocheved Shapira, who was selected to be killed, handed me her beautiful little daughter Henia, with her golden curls, to be given to her sister Zipora (Korbynik) who lived in Eretz Israel. But a German sharp eye discovered the transfer, and with cold blood, he pulled the girl out of my arms, holding her by her golden curls, and threw her with full force on the road and shattered her skull. It was about 40 degrees Celsius below zero, and those condemned to death stood frozen and in shock. Here and there were young people who tried to organize rebelion to jump the killers and escape. They were told by their parents not to do it, that maybe God would save us in the last minute. All of a sudden I heard the voice of my mother in law, who called my husband Jonah to not forget to pray Kaddish for them so that their souls would go to heaven. Surrounded on all sides, the Jews of Ilja were taken on their last walk, their final steps. Many walked apathetically, as if they were lambs in the slaughter. Many wore their tallits. They were pushed into the icehouse, which was situated in an empty lot near the house of Veinus. The machine guns shot at them as they were walking in. All the doors were then locked, and the building was set on fire. The sounds of Shema Israel, Adonai Eloheinu, Adonai HaEhad kept coming from inside it until everything became quiet and all became dust. Picture 1. The Brunstein family Standing from left; brother Ytzhak who came to Argentina before the war. The author, Bat- Sheva. Brother Yaakov who perished on. March 17, 1942 Sitting; parents; Yudel who died before the war and Yente who perished on March 17, 1942. The young Elimelech (melech) Brunstein who perished on. March 17, 1942 is at the bottom Picture 2 the Brunstein brothers who went to Argentina; on the right, Binyamin whom when the book was written lived in Argentina and Baruch who died in Argentina at a young age. The ones who were sentenced to live were locked in the barn of Tartavich until the killers finished their destruction of all the Jews in the town and burning their homes. We were freed only at night. We settled in a few houses across from the big synagogue. The houses we settled in started from Sarah Racha Sinders home (mother of Melech and Wolf), and ended in the house of Baruch Levin. Surrounding these homes there was barbed wire and this was a temporary ghetto for the few survivors. The next morning, Zusman Gitlitz and my husband were ordered to collect the bodies of the Jews that had been shot near their homes or in their hiding places. My father-in-law, Noach Riar, was able to hide during the massacre and survive. I asked him to live with us. He asked me to go with him to his home to take something. I refused and said to him, Only yesterday you were able to escape death and now you are already trying to risk your life? I will not go with you. My heart told me that something bad would happen, but my father-in-law was very stubborn and insisted that he should go. The son of his sister, the young boy Itzhak Alperovich, felt pity for him and joined him. They went to the house and opened the door. A Gestapo man came by, and he shot and killed them on the spot. My husband Jonah and Zusman Gitlitz, who collected the bodies, happened to pass by at that moment across the house. They received orders from that Gestapo man to take the two additional bodies. Jonah who was dismayed to see the body of his father refused to work for them any longer. For that he paid dearly. The Gestapo man beat him mercilessly, and he was wounded badly. Blood spread everywhere, and he had to lie in bed for several days until his wounds healed. A few days passed and my husband Jonah was transferred to the Vileyka Ghetto Camp for work, and at this point, my son and I were still in the Ilja Ghetto. I very much wanted to join my husband, but it was very difficult to even get in touch with my husband. Since Jews were not allowed to send mail, I had to illegally transfer notes to him by local people who went to Vileyka. But at this point there was no way to receive permission to join him. Life in the Ilja ghetto continued, but now there were no illusions about our fate. Most of the people knew that their days were numbered. In order for them to survive, they started organizing groups to build bunkers and hideouts, but no one wanted to have me join, fearing that my baby would cry and the hideout would be discovered. My soul was very bitter and I cried continuously. When the holy day of Shavuot came, finally the miracle that I so hoped for occurred. All of a sudden, there was an announcement in the Ilja police to have Rishka Epstein Yankel Sheinas and I with my baby to be taken out for transportation to Vileyka. So finally, during the holy day, we joined our husbands. It didnt take long, and the rest of the Jews in the Ilja Ghetto were massacred. Although most of them hid in their bunkers and hideouts, they were all caught. A few tried to escape, but they were shot while running. Only three people succeeded in reaching the forest: Shraga Solominsky, my husband cousin, Chaim Riar, and David Rubin. Shraga Solominsky and David Rubin joined the partisans and after the war came with us to Israel. Chaim Riar who also joined the partisans, was killed during a partisan mission near the village Olkovitz. It seemed that once again the hand of fate decided in the last minute to give us (my child and I ) a reprieve and let us survive. Life in the Ghetto of Vileyka was unbearable. The women had to harness themselves instead of horses, and to pull firewood. They also had to clear the snow from the streets, to clean the toilets, and other work. After a while they divided the population into two camps. The professional men who were under Commissar Schmidt and the women under the Jew from Kurenets, Zisting. After half a year, the womens ghetto was liquidated and most of them were killed, and then arguments started in our ghetto about escaping to the forest. I was all for escape, but my husband Jonah said that our baby would never survive life in the forest. I answered that its better he die from starvation or from freezing than that we should all be killed here by the Germans. Meanwhile, the idea of escaping became more and more favored by the Jews in Vileyka, so we started preparing for life in the forest. First we wanted to collect weapons and ammunition for the partisans. As the contact between the Ghetto and the partisans and other Jews in the forest increased, there was a Christian farmer who would bring wood for the German Commissar. This Christian man brought regards from the Jews who lived in the forest. The husband (Yerachmiel Shapira) of my sister-in-law Yoheved, who perished in the first massacre in Ilja, was amongst the Jews who hid in the forest. He would send us notes via the Christian farmer demanding that we should join him. The partisans demanded that we should transfer bullets and ammunition. The head of the camp/ghetto, Schatz, a Jewish guy originally from Austria, arranged for weapons. Some were stolen from the Germans and some were bought. We took anything we could. During the winter of 1943, a few days before the holy day of Purim, something unexpected occurred that made us run to the forest before the planned time. The farmer who was our contact with the partisans came to the ghetto to transfer the bullets that we would hide in a hollowed out piece of wood, which had been specially made. After the wood was put in his wagon, it seemed like the police needed his wagon, so one Gestapo man came and took the wagon from the farmer. When the Jews in the ghetto found out about it, they assumed that the police realized that we had been transferring weapons, and now they were going to get their revenge, so we fled unorganized. My husband Jonah took his yellow star off and walked out of the ghetto and out of the town in quick steps. I also took off the yellow tag and started walking through the main street of Vileyka, carrying my little son Yehudah. So like this we walked. First Jonah, and I many steps behind him. When we arrived to the outside edges of the town, he disappeared, and while I was looking for him, I encountered German soldiers who were training. I knew that I had no choice and that I could not retreat, so I walked confidently forward, resolved to walk straight, although I didnt even know where I was walking. So like this I passed by the German soldiers, and they didnt seem to suspect at all that I was Jewish. I couldnt find my husband, but I remember that in one of my conversations we decided that if we got lost, each one of us should try to reach Hatzentzitz. So now this became my goal. I found myself by the public slaughterhouse and the burned bridge on the river Vilja. I reached a small house near the slaughterhouse. I entered the door and told the Christian owner that I was a Jew. I continued saying, Now they are murdering us, but I prefer to be killed while escaping. The Christian man looked at me and said, Too bad. You are still a young woman and you might bring something useful to this world. He told me to wait there until nighttime, and then he would help me cross the frozen river. So he did that and blessed me with good luck. So now I was across the other side of the river. This was a dark, wintry night. I was in an unfamiliar surrounding, with a baby in my arms. The first thing I tried was to enter the forest and get lost deep in it. This was the first time in my life where I was in a wintry night alone in a forest. As I was getting deeper and deeper, I saw from afar, blinking lights. I kept walking until I reached a small house. Without considering the danger, I knocked on the door and entered. I put the baby on the bench near the entrance and asked the owner to let me rest. The owner gave my baby a little milk and he gave me some food. Only then did he ask me, Who are you? Where are you going in such bad weather?.....
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- Saturday, May 15, 2004 at 13:05:08 (EDT)
Sefer Ilia Kehilat Ilja; pirkei hayim ve-hashmada The community of Ilja; chapters of life and destruction Editor: A. Kopilevitz Published: Kfar Chabad, 1962 Publisher: Association of Former Residents of Ilja in Israel With the generous contribution by the Shapira brothers in Mexico And Ilia natives in America, Argentina and Israel, Contents Forward by the editor 9 For her reflection and recollection by Arie Kopilovitz 15 PART 1 THE HISTORY OF ILJA, A TOWN NAMED FOR ELIYAHU Her origin and chronicles by Arie Avi Avihud 21 The Ger Zedek (Prince Potozki converts to Judaism) by Arie Avi Aviva 23 Reb Menashe from Ilja 1767- 1831 by Tuvia Ben Chefetz 35 Reb Menashe (Ben Porat) from Ilja based on the article by S. Rosenfeld 37 Ilja as an inn off the Torah 69 The renowned Ilja Yeshiva by A. B. A K 71 The genius Rabbi Reuven from Dinburg (Dwinsk) by A. B. A K 73 The genius rabbi Moshe Shlomo Khary by A. B. A K 74 The genius rabbi Shmuel ben Yehoshua Zelig by M. Z. 77 The Genius Rabbi Wolf Broide by M. Z. 78 The genius Rabbi Moshe Yisrael Shapira the head of the Ilja Yeshiva from a Yovel book 79 Rabbi Yakov- Efraim son of Naftali Nachmin by Chaim Levin 81 Our Rabbi Avraham Eli Remez by Moshe Shlomo belkas 82 PART 2 THE PRIOD BETWEEN THE TWO WORLD WARS By Yosef Winetzki (Mexico) 89 My Shtetl Ilja by Eliezer Shapira (Mexico) 91 The connection between Ilja and Eretz Israel (200 years of Aliyah) by Arie Kopilovitz in commemoration of his parents; Abba and Gita (daughter of Shalom Shepsel Broide) Kopilovitz and sister Malka. 145 1. Aliyah of the students of the Gaon from Vilna c 1800 2. The BiluAliyah 3. Rabbi Yerucham Chefez and his wife (daughter if Noach Hotner) make Aliyah Bilu 4. Mordechai Zafran and the daughter of Moshe Mazal make Aliyah Bilu 5. Rabbi Binyamin Broide Makes Aliyah 6. The second Aliyah; Ytzhak Mazal, son of Teybel and Moshe, makes Aliyah 7. Mr. Meir Dizingoff (mayor of Tel Aviv) visits Ilja 8. Hachalutz members make Aliyah; 9. Arie mazal (Chaim Leib) goes to Israel 10. Tuvia Chefetz (1899- 1959) 11. Nechama nee Rogozinski Meirovitz 12. Cousins; Ester Laberfarb Brazovitz and Yehoshua Lapidot 13. Ahuva (daughter of Eliyahu Solominski) Teitelboim 14. Zipora (daughter of Noach Riar) Kurbyenik 15. Aliyah of Maapilim;Arie Kopilevitz the first maapil 16. Dvora Sherman makes aliyah to Kibutz Tel Yosef 17. Sonia nee Remez and husband Leon Belkes make Aliyah in 1941! 18. Yaakov Sinder, son of Eliyahu comes to Israel with the polish Army in 1942 19. The survivors come to Israel; 20. Shraga Solominski 21. Shalom Sinder 22. David Rubin 23. Bat Sheva nee Brunstein and Yona (Jonah) Riar 24. Fallen heroes of Israel; Ytzhak son of Shneior Chadash and Zeev Rodinzki 25. Dvora Rubinzik (daughter of Efraim) and her two daughters 26. Pnina nee Zavodnik Gutenberg 27. Yosef, son of Yechiel Yeroshavski 28. Dan Mendelson 29. Brothers; Yechezkel and mendel Chaikin 30. Risia (Rishka nee Sinder ) and first husband Shepsel Epstein, 31. Roza (daughter of Binyamka Brunstein) and her husband; Shraga Reznik. Her brother David Bronstein in Argentina. 32. Hirshel- Zvi Berman 33. Lea the daughter of Chaika Sosensky from Batrina and her husband ; Monik Zelzer 34. Ytzhak Dokshitzki 35. Chaya Ladislobovski, Daughter of Eltka nee kagan and Shmuel Zimermzn 36. Yisrael, Avraham,Ytzhak , Mordechai Levkov and their sister; Nechama nee Levkov 37. Chaim Levin The Zionist Movement by Arye bar Droma 211 *The establishment of Hachlutz *The school Tarbut in Ilja established by; Yakov Kopilovitz, Chaim David Chaikin, David Chaikin, Yosef Slonovitz, Ben Zion Broide, Eliyahu Rogozinski, Eliezer, son of Zemach Shapira, Abba Kopilovitz, Binyamin Brunstein. *The library Cherut and Tchiya and the librarians; Lyeshka (Eliezer) son of Baruch Levin and Chaim, son of Gdalyau Avril  Hachalutz Hatzair  The Gordonia movement and its leader; Bat Sheva nee Brunstein  Tiferet Habachurim and David Zalmanovski  Bitar movment Hachalutz in Elja Hachalutz in Elja by Ahuva nee Salominski Taitelboim 226 The Revisionist movement/ The new Zionists (Zeev Zabotinski) 229 *Reb Eliyahu Yesel *The movment leaders in Ilja; Klok Binyamin, Broide ben Zion, Zoot Moshe, Lapidot Moshe and Kopilovitz Abba. Remnants; my Shtetl Ilja by Tuvia ben Chefetz ZL from 5-2-1949 meeting 233 *The synagogue yard  David the combs salesman  Yankel the Shamash  The Bait Midrash  The Rabbo Wolf Broide  Reb Shmuel Freydkas father in law of Reb Binyamin Broide  Reb Moshe Mazal a Leibale Kovner descendent and son in law of Reb Binyamin Broide  Yerachmiel Efraim Ytzas  Rabbi Avraham Eli Remez  Reb Chaim Hendel Maaze  Reb Yaakov Sinder the katzav (butcher)  Reb Baruch Yosef  Reb Moshe Weines  Reb Yaakov Moshe Brunstein  Reb Zemach Shapira and Reb Shimon Zeidenkop  Reb Chaim Avraham Kopilovitz the Starasta  Reb Shalom Chaim The Kotler  Reb Shalom Sheftel Broide  Reb Efraim Koifman  Chazans and Magids  Torah reading  My mother; malka  Aliyots and geusts  Shabats Guests  The February revolution (1917)  Pogrom  the tragedy with the telephone  Tovia the wagoneer  The River My Ilja by Dvora Sherman 264 Cheder teachers; Elia kanterovitz, Yakov Dinerstein, my father; Yakov Sherman, Avraham Altman, Shlomo Chaim hapszer Tarbut school modern teachers; the dardak brothers, Borochovitz, Mrs. Remez H. Feldin A poem My Ilja by Arye Miriams 267 From the ledger of recollection by Eliezer Dinerstein (U.S.A) 269 Yankel Rashas, Yochanan Shimon Hutners Zemach Shapira, Bera levin, David Zalmanovski, With the Hebrew/ Jewish Brigade to Eretz Israel in the first world war 271 Ilja natives in America who joined the brigade; brothers Yehuda and Shimon lichterman and lebel Cohen Poems in Hebrew by Yehuda Lichterman written in New York 272 By Leibe Gitles 277  The small Beit Midrash  The communication with the world  The train station in Krasne (30 kilometers away)  The central town Vileika (30 kilometers away )  The bus service arrives in Ilja  Reb Elya Micles Kantorovitch  Reb Avraham Sheyes Altman  Reb Shlomo Chaim (Der Pasazer) Rodnik  Reb Moshe Yshayahu Zeidenkop  Mula (Shmuel) , Zemach Shapira youngest son.  Yosele Der Mlaach  Ilja market day Part 3 The Holocaust Words from the editors 303 Yizkor 307 The names of the martyrs 308 A tale of straggling, toil and tears by David Rubin 317 *The soviets (1939- 1941)  the Yudenrat members; Shlomo Koifman, Ben Zion Broide, Izik Seder  The ghetto  The Jewish resistance starts and the partizans in Chatzantzitz on March 14, 1942  The day of the slaughter, March 17, 1942  .June 7, 1942, the last day of the Ilja ghetto, with the perished; my fiancée Sara Susman and her little niece Yehudit, My parents; Rubin Zeev Wolf and Eitke, siblings;m Rosa and mairim and my aunt with her two children.  I escape with the Jews Of Chatzantzitz  With the partisans in the forests  We attack the German base in Ostoshitzki Gorodok  A mission on the Ilja- krasne road  The attack on Plashentzitz  With the Soviet military intelligence  The blockade  I become gravely wounded during the last fight in the area.  The war ends and I immigrate to Israel During the Slaughter, in the Ghetto and in the Forests by Bat Sheva nee Brunstein Riar 339 Survival against all odds the story of Bat Sheva and her baby Yehuda. The struggle for survival by Shraga Soliminski 373 During that day by Zushke Gitlitz in America 403 The Holocaust By Yona Riar 421 A memorial for perished friends, sister and parents by Arye Kopilovitz 441 Yaakov Lapidot (Yankole) 442 Yaakov Brunstein 443 Reuven Kopilovitz and his mother Beila Malka 444 Mordechai Rogozinski 445 Shlomo Zalman Sherman 446 Eliyahu Avril 447 My sister; Malka Kopilovitz 448 A memorial to my parents; Abba and Gitle Kopilovitz 450 Part 4 Natives of Ilja around the world The